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Thread: Shooting Distance

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    Default Shooting Distance

    Did some searching on the Forum and came up with nothing. I have a Tika T-3 in a 30-06 and I shoot factory ammo, My question is what kind of distance can I expect to get from this set-up. My hope is to use it for my sheep gun and with the right scope be comfortable out to 500 yds. Is this realistic?

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    only you can answer that question through practice(and not just on the bench)...the gun will do it just fine...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    only you can answer that question through practice(and not just on the bench)...the gun will do it just fine...
    Thats a perfect answer, I meant to ask can the "GUN/Ammo" set up shoot that distance taking out the shooter as a variable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ihntak View Post
    Did some searching on the Forum and came up with nothing. I have a Tika T-3 in a 30-06 and I shoot factory ammo, My question is what kind of distance can I expect to get from this set-up. My hope is to use it for my sheep gun and with the right scope be comfortable out to 500 yds. Is this realistic?
    Yes, it is realistic, but when sheep hunting there are/could be other contributing factors involved such as wind and angle of shot. That's why Bear said do a lot of practicing. Even though I doubt I would take a shot that far, as I always try to get as close as possible, but there is no reason that with a lot of practice and good shooting skills, that your 06' couldn't drop a ram in his tracks at 500 yards.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    It's all about the bullet.

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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Forgot to add, the 30-06 cartridge has been used for decades in competitive shooting, 1000 yards, etc.

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    I took a Ram at just over 500 yards with my Model 70 chambered in 30-06 using hand loads that I had practiced with a lot. For my skills, rifle and load I will say that was at my maximum range I would try. I had a standing ram, no wind, and a solid rest. I would recommend chronographing your load and printing out a drop chart. For me a range finder and ranging reticle are key to long shots.

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Past 300 things get interesting and you need to know yourself, the gun and round very well and only way to know that is taking a lot of cold bore shots at those ranges. Itís important that they are cold bore because your field shots will be cold bore.
     
    Also you need to know your velocity at range and use bullets that will still function at that velocity. A bullet designed for a 300WM at 200/300 yards may make for lost game from an 06 @ 500 yards because it didnít expand.
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    The '06 is capable at 500yds.....most shooters aren't.

    Like has been said previously- practice, practice and practice some more and pray for a shot half that distance.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Lets see a show of hands of those who can shoot to the limits of their 30-06 rifles.

    It's all up to the shooter. To be honest practical hunting ranges end at about 300 yards for everybody. And yes I'm well aware that many of us routinely take game and make good shots far beyond that distance. I find it odd though that so many of todays new generation of shooters/hunters think that all they need is the right rifle/cartridge/scope combo and they can make those half mile shots on deer/elk/sheep. Thats a fools errand to attempt such when you've no skills, training or practice to prove to yourself you can do it. The '06 in a good rifle is well capable ballistically of taking game at 500+ yards, bullet selection becoming much more critical, but the shooting ability to make such a shot in the field is rare indeed.
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    The cold kiss of reality. Thanks Murphy.

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    Thanks all for the responses. So the general consensus is that 500 yds is do able with factory ammo. Got it. Next question is, for that long of distance, what do you recommend for a zero distance?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ihntak View Post
    Thanks all for the responses. So the general consensus is that 500 yds is do able with factory ammo. Got it. Next question is, for that long of distance, what do you recommend for a zero distance?
    That goes right back to the bullet and muzzle velocity of the round.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338WM View Post
    That goes right back to the bullet and muzzle velocity of the round.

    But usually, in my experience, anyone that "plans" on shooting fairly long distances sights in for a zero at 200 yards. Or, some just sight in at 2-3" high at 100 yards. Here's a chart http://www.cpcartridge.com/30-06b.htm that will give you some idea with a variety of bullet weights.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    200 zero should give you a kill zone shot from around 100 to 300 without hold-off. Past 300 you need to know the true range and bullet drop so you can hold-over or dial it into your scope. That is the easy stuff, compensating for drop. Now reading wind, up/down angles, field positions and knowing what all this stuff does to your bullet . . . And what did what gets real tricky.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    That is the easy stuff, compensating for drop. Now reading wind, up/down angles, field positions and knowing what all this stuff does to your bullet . . . And what did what gets real tricky.
    I know one thing.....I wouldn't have the foggiest idea of how the wind would effect my bullet at any great distance. Never have needed to as that's what's so great about wind.........it covers up the noise you make while getting closer......lol. I did however have a little concern about angle once while sheep hunting, but it was within 100 yards so really wasn't a problem.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    I used a common trajectory program and test out to about 225 yards. Once I know I am on, I print out all the aiming points out to 500 yards in about 10 point type and tape it to the rear of the scope for easy reference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    200 zero should give you a kill zone shot from around 100 to 300 without hold-off. Past 300 you need to know the true range and bullet drop so you can hold-over or dial it into your scope. That is the easy stuff, compensating for drop. Now reading wind, up/down angles, field positions and knowing what all this stuff does to your bullet . . . And what did what gets real tricky.
    Ihnt Andy brings up some very valid points. Not sure of your mountain experience but you will soon learn the extreme importantance in judging wind and angles.. I have passed on a long shot at a goat due to wind before and have had hunters take 300 plus shots yet had to aim as if they were 100...
    I will say I am not a fan of holdover, my opinion is always hold hair. Once you pick out your ammo and know the velocity pick a zero that will give you a shot at a distance you are comfortable with without being too high or to low...

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    I know one thing.....I wouldn't have the foggiest idea of how the wind would effect my bullet at any great distance. Never have needed to as that's what's so great about wind.........it covers up the noise you make while getting closer......lol. I did however have a little concern about angle once while sheep hunting, but it was within 100 yards so really wasn't a problem.
    Very true fore most game but antelope will bust ya as far as they can see no mater how windy. Used to hunt them a lot, real hard on the knees to stalk in on them from a mile without getting busted.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    I used a common trajectory program and test out to about 225 yards. Once I know I am on, I print out all the aiming points out to 500 yards in about 10 point type and tape it to the rear of the scope for easy reference.
    This is well and good for a solid foundation, however, I don't think its adequate for the actual hunt until you put it to the test at 500 yards. And to answer Murphys question.......my hand is down. My opinion is that I have the knowledge to do so (shoot accurately to 500 yards) but, have never done so. My brother has a 257 Weatherby that he charted out but only practiced to 300. When the 460 yard deer came he missed. There is alot of factors. BC's can be off, velocity varies from rifle to rifle, lot to lot with factory ammo, etc etc, therefore putting your chart off. The newest sniper techniques include "trueing" your set up. Basicly, they shoot their rifle to a "medium" distance of 500 to 700 yards after zeroing and put these "true" points into a ballistic calculator. Many times this will enable them to find out the true BC of the bullet, not the published BC.

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