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Thread: Bait

  1. #1
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    Default Bait

    Hi,

    I know shrimp is the preferred ice fishing bait, but will the cooked work or should I go with the raw?

    Or, should I be considering anything else? This is our first year ice fishing, so I have been winging it so far!

    Thanks

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    We've always used those small packs of cooked salad shrimp, they work just fine. You can add a few fish bait Pautzkies (spelling?) eggs for eyeballs if you like...just don't try it on Big Lake...
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stanbiker View Post
    Hi,

    I know shrimp is the preferred ice fishing bait, but will the cooked work or should I go with the raw?

    Or, should I be considering anything else? This is our first year ice fishing, so I have been winging it so far!

    Thanks
    RAW is the best. The cooked cocktail shrimp are too brittle and will come off at the slighest nibble or even just from the jigging motion.
    Single salmon eggs sometimes work good. Small chunks of skein eggs works good too but is a lot messier(pink fingers).
    I tend to catch more rainbows on skein eggs and more landlocked salmon(Kokanees) on the shrimp if they are in the same lake.
    I use my homeade jigs or those made by custom jigs and spins. Tip them with shrimp and it works great.
    If your bait is lost the jig will still attract them.
    What I do is buy 1/2 or 1 pound of raw shrimp and cut them up at home into small pieces. Less waste and a smaller size piece when cutting at home on a cutting board then tearing it off out on the lake. Even when I don't find it on sale it is only $6 a pound for the cheap Taiwanese farmed white shrimp. Last time I figured it out I was paying about $.01-$.02 per piece of bait. Thats cheap enough I can live with the price of buying the raw shrimp. I buy the 45-60 size and each shrimp yields 8-10 pieces of bait.
    I then put a small handfull into snack size ziplocs. Each person gets their own bag. Take a bag per person out of the freezer the night before and you are good to go in the morning.
    1 pound of shrimp should yield about 20 bags.
    I have caught as many as 5-6 fish on a single piece of bait but 1-2 is the norm.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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  4. #4

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    I've had good luck using raw shrimp and a single egg on the same hook. Not sure if it matters but I like to think the color of the egg draws them in and the smell of the shrimp gets them to bite.

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    I've done well with shrimp (for most things) and herring (for pond burbot), but holy cow, the action on the synthetic and kind of gross and oily Gulp Alive floating salmon eggs really surprised me. Amazing stuff. Even caught a grayling through the ice on it, which I've never done on any other bait.
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    Never had a problem with the cooked salad shrimp, jigging it or when the fish bit it, catching that fish...but after reading the few posts here on the RAW shrimp, I'll be giving that a try the next time out, thanks! Guess I'll leave the lettuce & croutons at home also.
    "Grin and Bear It"

  7. #7

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    The raw shrimp works best for me. I prefer the wild saltwater shrimp to the farmed. A trick I have used for the cocktail shrimp is to microwave it for a few seconds and then they toughen up a bit. Not too much though or they just fall apart...

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    In addition to what has been mentioned, I suggest you look into using artificial floating eggs. There is various brands, I have used "Nitro" floating eggs with very good success.
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    We went out today. I had a few pieces of leftover raw shrimp from last week and a tub of cooked salad shrimp. They both caught fish, but more on the raw. The raw shrimp also lasted a lot longer on the hook

    I'll have to look into the nitro eggs.

    Thanks for the suggestions

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    We have had good luck with the mentioned shrimp and egg combo, usually on a bare hook. But I must say the Swedish pimple is my lure of choice, if you lose your bait it still works. I have Noticed most of the trout I have caught over the last few years seem to be full of what looks like a fresh water shrimp? Tiny and blackish in color, I was actually thinking of making some jigs that resembled that and give it a try one day. Good luck!

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    When I used bait for trout and salmon it was always cooked salad shrimp. Later in the season it seemed the trout stopped biting it but the little salmon were still tearing it up. Now I like catching bigger fish and stick to jigging with spoons and grubs seems to improve catch rate later in the season also.

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    Red face Important safety tip!

    One thing to remember about using shrimp: DON'T FORGET TO TAKE THE BAG OF LEFTOVER SHRIMP OUT OF YOUR COAT POCKET WHEN YOU ARE DONE FISHING FOR THE DAY. Don't ask me how I know.

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    Shrimp you can stop at the locak food store an buy just as many that you want , don't need pounds I have purchest small amount of bait / food

    many times , this is great for people that don't fish all the time an only get out 1 or 2 times a season

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMCOD View Post
    One thing to remember about using shrimp: DON'T FORGET TO TAKE THE BAG OF LEFTOVER SHRIMP OUT OF YOUR COAT POCKET WHEN YOU ARE DONE FISHING FOR THE DAY. Don't ask me how I know.
    Lol i left in my lil tackle box. After being in the garage a few days i remembered

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    you bet I smelled it all the way over here glad you got it befor i called the EPA people to clean up the smell [ just Kidding }

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    Shrimp have rarely been our preferred bait.

    If you go to an Asian grocery store, you can buy various size packages of baby octopus or baby squid. At the larger mainstream grocery stores you can get larger and smaller (both) raw squid. Those, as well as various sizes of herring and pieces of whitefish (providing the whitefish is caught in such a way that it can legally be used as bait) make for superb baits.

    Some folks fishing near us at an undisclosed location, late one evening, used baby octopus and glow-in-the-dark lures of a variety of sorts, and the snow was impressively red with blood around their holes the next A.M.

    We eat the shrimp ourselves (purchased raw and stir-fried or otherwise cooked). Why fish with more expensive baits, ultimately feeding the fish, with food that we rarely afford to eat ourselves?

    In some of the Canadian and other lakes that disallow fish and fish by-products as bait as a matter of trying to prevent the spread of water-borne/fish-borne diseases, we've used everything from chicken hearts and livers, to raw bacon strips. Done correctly on a treble hook, with two hearts on two hooks (one each on two of the three hooks) and a short, cut, narrow-ish strip of bacon on the third hook, acting as a tail, it looks like some sort of strange sea critter, and we've done well with that too!

    In all the cases above, we were fishing for lakers, and have done quite well. If it leaves a decent scent/blood trail, is appealing to the fish, and additionally resembles something not too far removed from the scent that their food would typically exude (a bonus), etc., it'll likely catch fish.

  17. #17
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruffle View Post
    Shrimp have rarely been our preferred bait.

    If you go to an Asian grocery store, you can buy various size packages of baby octopus or baby squid. At the larger mainstream grocery stores you can get larger and smaller (both) raw squid. Those, as well as various sizes of herring and pieces of whitefish (providing the whitefish is caught in such a way that it can legally be used as bait) make for superb baits.

    Some folks fishing near us at an undisclosed location, late one evening, used baby octopus and glow-in-the-dark lures of a variety of sorts, and the snow was impressively red with blood around their holes the next A.M.

    We eat the shrimp ourselves (purchased raw and stir-fried or otherwise cooked). Why fish with more expensive baits, ultimately feeding the fish, with food that we rarely afford to eat ourselves?

    In some of the Canadian and other lakes that disallow fish and fish by-products as bait as a matter of trying to prevent the spread of water-borne/fish-borne diseases, we've used everything from chicken hearts and livers, to raw bacon strips. Done correctly on a treble hook, with two hearts on two hooks (one each on two of the three hooks) and a short, cut, narrow-ish strip of bacon on the third hook, acting as a tail, it looks like some sort of strange sea critter, and we've done well with that too!

    In all the cases above, we were fishing for lakers, and have done quite well. If it leaves a decent scent/blood trail, is appealing to the fish, and additionally resembles something not too far removed from the scent that their food would typically exude (a bonus), etc., it'll likely catch fish.
    I don't know what you are paying for your squid or octopus but with the price of shrimp at @ $6 a pound (ful retail but often on sale for less) it only cost me about 1.5 cents -2 cents per piece of bait. If that is too expensive then I don't know what to say.
    What does the squid or octopus cost you per piece of bait?
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  18. #18
    Member Whitefisher's Avatar
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    try my bait..... see my post........the best fish bait... !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    I have had better luck with raw shrimp cut into pieces. I get it from Walmart, like $8 a bag and enough bait to last me and my son 3-5 fishing trips easy.


    I may try that little bait mixture that was mentioned though, sounds interesting.

  20. #20
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