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Thread: How cold is too cold to safely fire your bow

  1. #1

    Default How cold is too cold to safely fire your bow

    Just curious how your bow fired in certain temps. How cold was it and how long was your bow exposed to this cold. Any general advise on this matter would be appreciated I have a Mathews z7x

  2. #2
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    The few times I have shot below zero I definitely noticed wonky trajectories and funny noises. This was an older glass composite bow.....not sure on the newer stuff.

  3. #3
    Sponsor protaxidermy's Avatar
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    I think it all depends on the bow you are shooting.

    I hunted for 20 years with a Golden Eagle & really loved it , Till about 15 below . It got a LOT stiffer.

    I have a PSE Brute that I got for Christmas a couple years ago & the shorter limbs seam to be more forgiving & a little more accurate even down to 35 below. Any colder than that & I am staying in the house watching hunting on TV instead

    One thing I did find out though, You Rubber arrow holders wont give up your arrows at 30 below.

    I had to stand on my bow to get one out & the moose must have really thought it was a pretty neat show cause he watched me like I was a clown at the rodeo. Till it Finally came out with a loud snap, & he took off.

    RJ Simington

  4. #4

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    I have only shot down to a few degrees below zero, but had no problem at all. One thing I would think would be to make sure the bow is out in the cold long enough that the entire thing has cooled off to that temperature. Different materials in the bow will cool off at different rates, so if you just pull it out of the truck and try to shoot a few minutes later, it most likely won't be evenly cooled and thus shooting off a bit (pulling one direction or another). Let the limbs and everything equalize.

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    Most everything I read on the cold is point of impact changes will be minor but will increase with distance.. Some say their pounds increase, personally the biggest thing I would worry about is the amount of clothes you are wearing to stay warm and their bulky ness...

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    Member DrB's Avatar
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    I currently shoot an Elite but took a moose and a muskox with my older Diamond bow last winter. I have practiced regularly to 20 below zero in preparation for such hunts. I have never had a malfunction with the bow in cold weather. The biggest challenge is getting accustomed to heavier clothing and gloves. It is important to practice in the gear that you may be wearing in the field.

    Good luck . . .

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    I went to Fairbanks back in November of 2011 to bow hunt the HT moose in the FMA. Either on the 21 or 22nd I took a 46.5 inch bull with my bow. My bow is 23 years old Ė I have had it since I was 12. Brand is a Force II and I think it was made by Proline. The draw weight is 62 lbs. When I shot the bull the temperature was around -35 degrees. It was so dang cold! The bull was 35 yards away and after the shot it ran 100 yards and fell within a minute. I got 15 inches penetration, one lung, direct heart, and cut one of its ribs in half. I donít know if the bows stiffness was different (I was), I donít know if it was slower, etc., but I do know the bow killed a nice bull moose with it was -35 degrees and it did not break.

  8. #8

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    I shoot a Z7 too, and have hunted the Haul Rd several times in November down past 30 below. I used to shoot a whisker buscuit, and noticed the longer I was in the cold, the more stiff the bristles became and effected my trajectory. This was really confusing to me, as I would be out of the truck for 10-15 minutes waiting on a group of caribou to pass, and always shot low. I would get back in the truck (my bow warmed up of course) and as soon as we got to camp I'd shoot at a Block and be dead on (within a minute or two, so the bristles were still warm). Fixed this by putting a handwarmer in the whisker bisket and drilled the next bou that walked by. My hunting buddies shot different types of bows at the same temp, no issues. Trick is to keep your bow out of the snow, since it will be warm as soon as you step out, the snow could stick causing a string to pop off the cam or get just a tiny bit of moisture in a drop-away.

  9. #9

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    umm....or just not road hunt? I'd consider a drop away and some uber good lubrication. The moisture issues you're going to experience going in and out of a hot anything is going to really start screwing things up (cams is another one). Better off leaving it cold, no different than a gun.

    I've shot fiberglass and wood down to -40 for hares my first few years here. -30 is more common. She shoots just fine. It was also shooting wood arrows. I will say drawing itself is a royal pain. You've got a load of cloths on. Something to consider.....arm and chest guards are almost mandatory!

    For the stick guys I dont know if anyone else has experienced it. I havent thankfully but a buddy has. He shoots in the cold more than most. Leaves his stick in the truck all day at work and will shoot after work. The cold soaking spiderwebed his and his sons finish. The maker make some mods to the finish and fixed it. if you've experienced it holler and I can put you in contact with the bowyer. I dont know first hand what was changed as its been a number of years. Its the only bowyer he shoots and he's still ordering more lol.

  10. #10

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    Reread my post...the warming/cooling issue only slowed the diagnosis of my problem, not caused it. Staying in the cold for longer periods would just make it worse and make you have to guess how much your arrow would drop. Do they have lubricant that is rated colder than -30? If so, never heard of it. I think anybody who says they hunt effectively all day long at -30 or colder without heating up at regular intervals is full of it and telling stories.


    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    umm....or just not road hunt? I'd consider a drop away and some uber good lubrication. The moisture issues you're going to experience going in and out of a hot anything is going to really start screwing things up (cams is another one). Better off leaving it cold, no different than a gun.

    I've shot fiberglass and wood down to -40 for hares my first few years here. -30 is more common. She shoots just fine. It was also shooting wood arrows. I will say drawing itself is a royal pain. You've got a load of cloths on. Something to consider.....arm and chest guards are almost mandatory!

    For the stick guys I dont know if anyone else has experienced it. I havent thankfully but a buddy has. He shoots in the cold more than most. Leaves his stick in the truck all day at work and will shoot after work. The cold soaking spiderwebed his and his sons finish. The maker make some mods to the finish and fixed it. if you've experienced it holler and I can put you in contact with the bowyer. I dont know first hand what was changed as its been a number of years. Its the only bowyer he shoots and he's still ordering more lol.

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