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Thread: Un-Bedding a rifle stock

  1. #1
    Member Ripper's Avatar
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    Default Un-Bedding a rifle stock

    OK, so is it difficult (or even possible) to remove a bedding job?

    I have an old Model 788 with with a bedding job that I'd like to redo. I am also considering doing my own bedding job on a McMillan stock I am buying.

    I am just wondering if it is possible to remove the bedding from the old wooden stock on the 788, and if it is possible to potentially remove bedding on the fiberglass McMillan stock (in case I screw up!).

    I assume it is acra glass on the 788, and I was planning on using Marine-Tex on the fiberglass McMillan. Is one type easier to remove than the other?

    Thanks!

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    Just insert the bit of your choice into a dremel and go at it. But don't take all the bedding material out near the end of the barrel channel because the old bedding will help hold the barreled action straight. I would also leave just a tiny amount in front of the recoil lug area to hold the barreled action level.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ripper View Post
    OK, so is it difficult (or even possible) to remove a bedding job?

    I have an old Model 788 with with a bedding job that I'd like to redo. I am also considering doing my own bedding job on a McMillan stock I am buying.

    I am just wondering if it is possible to remove the bedding from the old wooden stock on the 788, and if it is possible to potentially remove bedding on the fiberglass McMillan stock (in case I screw up!).

    I assume it is acra glass on the 788, and I was planning on using Marine-Tex on the fiberglass McMillan. Is one type easier to remove than the other?

    Thanks!
    "Glass Bedding" is easy to redo again and again. "Plain" epoxies are easily removed with either a chisel type tool or something such as a Dremel. Epoxies with powdered fillers (steel, stainless, titanium, etc.) can be more difficult to remove, but a Dremel will do it with the appropriate cutting/grinding attachment. For the last many years I use Devcon 10110 for all of my recoil lug bedding. It has some type of powdered steel and will dull steel cutting tools in fairly short order. Carbide tools work much better for 10110 if you have several jobs on the agenda. Once you have removed a sufficient amount of the previous bedding prep the stock and metal like you would for any other bedding project and you'll have no issues.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  4. #4
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    In a wooden stock you can use methyl chloride based paint remover to soften and remover the epoxy. Of course it will also get the finish on the outside and burn your hands so you have to be carefull with the stuff! Wear nitrile glove and googles and a long sleeved shirt.

    A lot easier than mechanically removing the stuff but don't use it on a fiberglass or synethic stock. If you are completely re-doing a wooden stock you can just do the whole thing at once.
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