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Thread: Biolite Stove

  1. #1
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Biolite Stove

    Hi folks,

    Just wondering if any of you have used the new Biolite Stove? It's a wood burner that generates electricity. Comes in two sizes, one that would be suitable for base camp and the other, while a bit heavy as stoves go, would work in a spike camp situation.

    Intriguing idea.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I've read a few review from out member that have tried one. I'm sure they will speak up.
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I've read a few review from out member that have tried one. I'm sure they will speak up.

    I've got one and took it to Kodiak. It's a good stove as far as stoves go. When it's packed full of wood and burning on high, it'll boil water pretty quickly. It's a bit heavy, though. The main thing to keep in mind with the battery charger is temperature. I think they advertise 60 minutes of talk time on an iPhone from a 20 minute charge. There's no way in hell that number is accurate up here. I had to run the stove wide open using hickory chunks I'd brought down with me for 2 hours just to get my phone to about 40%. While it's better than nothing, it wasn't impressive. I haven't used it in warmer weather, so I can't speak on that, although I'm sure battery life would be a lot better and probably charge a little quicker. It was neat to have on a base camp based fly-in hunt for 2 weeks. Would I take it anywhere that I had to hike in and up? I'm still not sure. I want to see how it performs in the warmer weather. Although it is a tad heavy, there's something to be said about being able to burn (and cook with) stuff laying around on the ground. I plan to put it through it's paces over the summer and I'll have more info after that; but, as it stands - as a stove, heavy yet reliable. As a battery charger, mediocre at best in cold weather. If you have the patience to sit by it and keep adding wood for hours, then it's awesome. Hopefully warmer weather use will prove better.

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    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Search function is your friend

  5. #5
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mod elan View Post
    Search function is your friend
    Ouch! Maybe his search function is broken...Here ya go Mike :

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...hlight=biolite
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...hlight=biolite
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...hlight=biolite
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Sorry Mike! I tried really, really hard but couldn't resist

  7. #7
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mod elan View Post
    Sorry Mike! I tried really, really hard but couldn't resist
    Okay, well I guess I deserved that one....

    So how about the Kelly Kettle?

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  8. #8
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Now that is mighty interesting. Well thought out and designed.

  9. #9
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mod elan View Post
    Now that is mighty interesting. Well thought out and designed.
    Dang. I was hoping for more links... now I have to search them out!
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    Okay, well I guess I deserved that one....

    So how about the Kelly Kettle?

    -Mike
    I've got the small & large stainless Kelly Kettles.

    I'm amazed how fast and how little fuel is needed to boil water.

    Well built.
    "The older I get, the better I was."

  11. #11
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    I would be interested in finding out the heat retention between the aluminum and stainless versions. Thinking I would get the stainless since even the lightest aluminum one is heavy for a 1 or 2 person hike.

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    One thing to keep in mind, they need to be full of water while burning.
    Melting the kettle is possible if used dry. More so with the aluminum model.
    This limits their usefulness as a cook stove.
    They are somewhat large in person. I use mainly when on quads, snowmachine etc.
    "The older I get, the better I was."

  13. #13
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by travelers View Post
    They are somewhat large in person. I use mainly when on quads, snowmachine etc.
    That's what I was thinking. A good setup for the rigs.

  14. #14
    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    I'm thinking about trying one of these, http://www.solostove.com/
    It seems a pretty well thought out stove.
    I may be slow, but I get where I'm going!

  15. #15
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    I'm going to boycott that one. You would think that the youtube video would have at least a little info on the stove, but NO! I have to watch some scruffy twit talk about hiking, becoming one with himself and blah blah blah.

  16. #16
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I picked up an m-kettle from Goo last year. I think it is great for trips with some means of conveyance like ATV/Raft/Canoe. It weighs more, boils a little slower and can be hard to find dry fuel for in wet weather especially above tree line. Those are all big negatives when I am cold, tired and wet! It also smells up my pack with the flavor of wood smoke and takes longer to cool. If I was on an extended trip I would take it as a companion to my isobutane stove and just use it whenever I had dry fuel available so that I can conserve my cylinders. It does boil pretty quick, especially for a solid fuel stove. I would definitely have one if I had a cabin out in the Talkeetna or Yentna areas or anywhere I had plenty of access to spruce trees. I guess my point is that it is well suited for some purposes but like most all of our gear there is a tradeoff. Mine won't be along on every trip but it definitely has it's uses and in the right areas it will never run out of fuel.

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