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Thread: Nelson Island Muskox

  1. #1

    Default Nelson Island Muskox

    So have you ever thought about getying a Nelson Island Registration Permit?

    Don't even think about it.

    Stand in line for 2 days for 25 permits. I thought regisration was unlimited with a quota to end the season when the harvest limit was reached? Oh so we go over a few animals -cut the quota back next year.

    90 % Native owened. Good luck finding access.

    What would be the idea behind a state managed hunt on land you have no chance of hunting nor picking up a tag?

    So much for were all Alaskans. We wonder why we don't get along.

    Sadly Louie

  2. #2
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Twenty five people had a good chance. The state manages game on all land in the state including native and federal land. Anyone in Alaska can deny your use of private land or any personal property for that matter. Just because you get a Alaska driver license don't mean you can drive my truck.I get along fine with most and only see problems with its my right crowd.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  3. #3
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    What would you propose that the state does?
    Death is like an old whore in a bar--I'll buy her a drink but I won't go upstairs with her.

  4. #4

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    Alaskalouie, have you tried to get a permit? Did you research on how to get permission to hunt the land? There are ways to do it, it's not easy, but there are ways....

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    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
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    I agree that there are ways to do this hunt, as I've looked into it myself, however given the logistics I just don't think it's worth it. I ended up doing a Ox hunt in Shishmaref last year for less than $1000 and had a great time. Unfortunately it looks like most muskox hunts are shut down in AK so Nelson Is. might be worth the effort for some.

  6. #6

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    I just do not get it a hunt manged by the state on private land? Let the locals manage there heard. Most all RX hunts are unlimited tag quota hunts where however many hunters pickup a tag hunt report there harvest and when the harvest goal is met the hunt closes. This gives the impression that you could pickup a tag maybe find a way in to hunt 10% of the hunt area? Really. I did check this out the line for the 25 tags started 2 days early, really? Leave it subsistence don't give the impression a life long AK resident is on the same ground here. We gave the ground away. I'm glad my Dad fought in the wars to make sure you got to keep it.

    Good Luck All.
    Louie

  7. #7
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=alaskalouie; Leave it subsistence don't give the impression a life long AK resident is on the same ground here. We gave the ground away. I'm glad my Dad fought in the wars to make sure you got to keep it.

    Good Luck All.
    Louie[/QUOTE]

    Think about it.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  8. #8
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskalouie View Post
    I just do not get it a hunt manged by the state on private land? Let the locals manage there heard.
    By that logic all hunting on private land should be managed by the landowner. What about Delta bison? The bison are found on private land the majority of the time. Should private landowners get to manage that herd themselves? What about if I have a moose walk across my yard...should I be able to shoot it, or should the state manage that ability?

    Game found in Alaska is the property of the state until it is legally harvested, regardless of whether it is found on public or private land. Yes, there is room for improvement in the management of certain areas, but abdicating the management of populations to landowners is a terrible idea in my opinion.

    On a side note, there are plenty of registration hunts that manage tag #s in a similar fashion in order to prevent overharvest. Unit 7 and 15 goat registration hunts are a prime example - be in line early on November 1st or forget about getting a tag. Ship Creek moose works likewise, as do Minto Flats moose (I think) along with a number of others.

  9. #9
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    Think about it.
    Rep dispenser is empty....
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
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    Maybe I shouldnt say this but...
    I may disagree with post #4. I wanted to hunt some land on the other side of land owned by Doyon, I was being a responsible outdoorsman and did some research and found an email address for a contact to get a "trespass permit" as it was called on the website to gain access to these Doyon properties and was told in very few words that I have the wrong grandparents to be able to cross that huge piece of land for access to the other side.... He asked if i was a doyon shareholder and i told him i was not and i asked how one becomes a shareholder he quit responding. I guess some folks hold grudges. I think there ought to be something in place for non share holders to be able to cross them, but it is private property. No way no how without the right grandparents. That was the sum of correspondence with him.

  11. #11
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sambuck12 View Post
    I think there ought to be something in place for non share holders to be able to cross them,
    Sometimes there is. Easement. Check with BLM about locations of easements thru native land

    Is all of Nelson Is. private? YK Delta refuge covers most all of that area in unit 18. Sould be public land there.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
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  12. #12
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    It is not the landowners responsibility to explain the easements to you. Nothing says they even have to talk to you, but that doesn't mean access does or does not exist.
    Death is like an old whore in a bar--I'll buy her a drink but I won't go upstairs with her.

  13. #13
    Member Steve H.'s Avatar
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    Don't forget Navigable Waters which are managed by ADNR.

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    Member PacWestFishTaxidermy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    By that logic all hunting on private land should be managed by the landowner. What about Delta bison? The bison are found on private land the majority of the time. Should private landowners get to manage that herd themselves? What about if I have a moose walk across my yard...should I be able to shoot it, or should the state manage that ability?
    It's a sad day in America when someone asks some of the questions you just asked. Constitutionally and in the tradition of liberty, ONLY a landowner would have the say on what goes on, on that land. PERIOD. Are you kidding me? Is it realistic these days? No, but not because it "doesn't make sense." It's because the state and federal governments have already been allowed to encroach upon landowner's rights. For example, most states claim that indigenous animals belong to the entire state. That is a power grab, plain and simple, even if you agree with it. Private property was the most sacred treasure according to our founders, and when people like you are so complicit with that right being eroded, it is sad. On most farms, the landowner is the one actually feeding those animals and giving them shelter and safe breeding grounds, etc. Once subsidies began for landowners, it gave states an opening to start calling the shots.

    So in short, "logic" has nothing to do with anything. History and reality does. It's like totally agreeing with the "logic" of people having to take classes and buy permits to own a gun, which is a guaranteed right. There IS something wrong with that, even if you agree with it.

  15. #15
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PacWestFishTaxidermy View Post
    So in short, "logic" has nothing to do with anything.
    ...And a wasted mind is a terrible thing.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  16. #16
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I will be the first to say that it is extremely frustrating to have huge parcels of land that are only perhaps 1/2 mile wide paralleling our roads and blocking access to millions of acres of state land beyond. I would LOVE the state to build roads crossing some of it as access points at least that would provide a mutual benefit to the land owners of the private property and the stake holders of the public land beyond (all of us). The problem with easements is that though they exist they frequently aren't marked and even with GPS it can be challenging to find exactly where the easement is. Once a trail is somewhat established along an easement people tend to wonder off the trail onto private lands or the trail gets damaged and people leave the easement to get around the obstacle. Add to that the vast number of land owners who refuse to accept that there is a legal easement and will mark it as no trespassing, put up fences or gates and even set traps to damage equipment or hurt people. I rarely see people leaving a road to ride marked private lands when there is a legal trail at it's end.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskalouie View Post
    So have you ever thought about getying a Nelson Island Registration Permit?

    Don't even think about it.


    Sadly Louie
    Huh. Thought about it, researched it, planned it, and my $20 muskox bull from Nelson easily made P&Y... So you may wish to listen to Kusko's good advice.

    And BTW my dad fought in the "war" and earned a purple heart and a bronze star, and he shot a nice bull too!

  18. #18

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    Thanks for all your Dad has done!
    Louie
    Quote Originally Posted by Arrow1 View Post
    Huh. Thought about it, researched it, planned it, and my $20 muskox bull from Nelson easily made P&Y... So you may wish to listen to Kusko's good advice.

    And BTW my dad fought in the "war" and earned a purple heart and a bronze star, and he shot a nice bull too!

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I will be the first to say that it is extremely frustrating to have huge parcels of land that are only perhaps 1/2 mile wide paralleling our roads and blocking access to millions of acres of state land beyond. I would LOVE the state to build roads crossing some of it as access points at least that would provide a mutual benefit to the land owners of the private property and the stake holders of the public land beyond (all of us). The problem with easements is that though they exist they frequently aren't marked and even with GPS it can be challenging to find exactly where the easement is. Once a trail is somewhat established along an easement people tend to wonder off the trail onto private lands or the trail gets damaged and people leave the easement to get around the obstacle. Add to that the vast number of land owners who refuse to accept that there is a legal easement and will mark it as no trespassing, put up fences or gates and even set traps to damage equipment or hurt people. I rarely see people leaving a road to ride marked private lands when there is a legal trail at it's end.
    Do you think it is a coincidence that the land along the Richardson looks like a checkerboard?

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