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Thread: [help] young and able seeking contact in Alaska

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    Default [help] young and able seeking contact in Alaska

    Hello everyone, I'm a first time poster here but have been lurking around the forum for some time now - I've finally mustered the courage to make this post, so if you are reading this let me sincerely thank you in advance. After much introspection and careful thought I've decided that I want to take steps to work towards living a subsistence lifestyle, as much as that is possible, in Alaska. It's a tough challenge, no doubt, but one I believe is absolutely possible to overcome, with a little help. That's why I'm here today before you...I know that many people venture to Alaska with romantic ideas about living off the land and that many, many fall short, and while I too in truth have similar dreams, what I realize is that a change like this doesn't come overnight, or easily. I'm aware of my own shortcomings but know that by the grace of God and resolute determination I may overcome them and see my dreams turn to reality.

    My name is Brad, I'm a 30-year old computer technician and network administrator born and raised in Wisconsin who loves spending time camping and backpacking with my German Shepherd, Gemma. I am a white, Christian, pro-liberty-minded man of modest means interested in self-sufficiency, preparedness, and simpler living. What I may lack in knowledge make up for quickly with my determination and willingness to learn - I'm always trying new things and firmly believe that one's education never really stops. Having just crossed the 30 mark, I feel strongly that I am at a proverbial fork in the road ... My whole life I've been raised around hunting, fishing, and the outdoors...yet I can't help but feel out of touch with nature in my fast paced and increasingly unsatisfying lifestyle of fast paced technology. As I look at my dog Gemma, I can see that look of defeat in her eyes and it tugs at my soul, having resigned herself to a solid daily meal and a weekly trip to the dog park to chase the occasional errant city-squirrel... while I know she's healthy and fairly content, she deserves so much more. I owe it to her, I owe it to myself. I feel a bit like a man whose been mistakenly born into the wrong century. These days, I believe there is a serious disconnect when it comes to where all our food and goods come from. If, God forbid, something should happen to our supply infrastructure I firmly believe most people would be up a creek with no paddle... and rather than be a victim, looking to outside sources to take care of me I've decided that I need to learn the skills NOW that I don't currently have, so that I can take care of myself and my family if that day should ever come. Even if that day never comes, I want to live a life that is more genuine, more real than what I have been so far. After giving it much careful consideration, My goal is to work hard towards getting a small patch of wilderness in Alaska to call my own -- nothing major, just a simple and modest place where I can begin a new life outside of the big city and all its trappings, for better or worse. Not being exceptionally wealthy myself, and currently living in Wisconsin, it seems like a foolish idea to by over-the-counter land sight unseen, a better plan would be to get up there first, make sure Alaska is really for me, and start researching property locally when I can get boots on the ground. By the grace of God perhaps my words here will touch someone and that they in turn may help me to find my first few steps in this unknown place. The first step has been acknowledging my dream and setting a concrete goal to strive towards. Rather than procrastinate I've decided that there is no time like the present - this must be done...I don't want to be 70 years old, looking back one day with disdain and regret, wishing I just just taken a chance to follow my dreams. If not now...then when? I want to live life to the fullest, and earn that right by way of my own sweat, blood, and tears. Winter camping in Wisconsin is something that I do for fun, but I understand fully that it takes on a whole other meaning when doing it in -40 degree temps in the heart of bear country, where you and yours are for all effective purposes 'on the menu'. I have no illusions about this, but I DO have much a learn and a willingness to do so humbly. Having lived in Wisconsin my entire life, I feel that I am more prepared than most may be for dealing with the harsh reality of sustained -40 degree temperatures and all that comes with it. Mushing and training a team of dogs has long been a dream of mine. I have no delusions about the difficulty of life up North, nor do I expect a free or easy ride. I know that I may fail, but I believe I can succeed, and while asking for help like I am today is very humbling for me I also know that I must swallow my pride and do so in order to set myself up for the best possible chance at success. I think it's equally important to have a solid backup plan - that said, I'm not going down without a fight, and I'm not going down without expending every ounce of my being to make it work.

    Ideally, I'd like to meet someone who either has a cabin that could benefit from a respectful 'sitter', a landowner who could use another strong young back in exchange for letting me pitch my shelter there (A 16ft Sioux Indian Tipi w/ Stove), or someone who simply has a small plot of unused land that I could caretake for them while I gain a foothold in this new place. What supplies I will use/need I will mostly be bringing with me, including food, medical, firearms, hand tools, appropriate clothing, fuel, etc... which I've been storing for the last several years and have about a 24 month supply of to ease my transition. My German Shepherd female will be making the trip with me as well, but she is exceptionally well trained and behaved. I am deeply respectful of others and will treat any land that I may graciously be granted access to even better than if it were my own. I believe that most people my age lack a certain dignity that used to be commonplace in society, but is waning fast. I consider myself a pretty good cook - I'm also an avid writer. I get along very well with other people and have no problem with strangers. I am far from a material person and I need very little to actually be comfortable and content. I really enjoy composing music in my free time on any type of instrument, also I enjoy fishing and hunting. I am not a substance abuser, nor do I have any criminal record to speak of. I am very skilled with Electronics and technology, although I suspect the need for that type of skill is not as great in the Wilder parts of the world. That said, I am a quick learner and never a quitter, willing to do what it takes to survive and contribute. I have been spending all my free time of late getting my 'ducks in a row' for the move, but what I need now is to establish a few friends up there in Alaska with similar mindsets who can help me land safely when I arrive. This is a really important piece of the puzzle, and one that I have to figure out before I can begin this new chapter in my life. I can do anything I put my mind to. I don't particularly care about electricity or amenities... I fully expect to be hauling and splitting wood. Rather than come to Alaska and work behind another desk, I'd rather spend that time and energy towards a thankful landowner, and to further my goals.

    If you have made it this far, thank you, and God Bless! I encourage you to please reach out to me if you have any words of advice or think you help me on this journey in some way, big or small. I promise you it will be very appreciated by one man and his Shepherd. Thank you for your time,

    Brad in Wisconsin

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    Hey Brad in Wisconsin, Todd from Wisconsin here, I've been up here since 1989. If there is anything I can do for ya, just let me know. Where in Wis are you?

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    Welcome to the forum and best wishes in fulfilling your dream. Have a look at this ad for someone with your background needing help in Bethel. Bethel is a remote village and may be a way to get started on your path.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...LAN-WAN-VMWare
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    Quote Originally Posted by logman 49 View Post
    Hey Brad in Wisconsin, Todd from Wisconsin here, I've been up here since 1989. If there is anything I can do for ya, just let me know. Where in Wis are you?
    Hi Todd, it's good to meet you, and inspiring to see another person from Wisconsin who made the trip. It sounds like things must have worked out for you, which is great I'm live in a suburb of Milwaukee, about 20 miles from Lake Michigan. Fishing's good here, but I can't wait to see what it's going to be like up there... I can only fantasize/imagine... Thanks sincerely for your support, I'm trying to make all the friends I can right now while sorting out these next crucial steps.

    Warm Regards,

    Brad in Wisconsin

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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Welcome to the forum and best wishes in fulfilling your dream. Have a look at this ad for someone with your background needing help in Bethel. Bethel is a remote village and may be a way to get started on your path.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...LAN-WAN-VMWare
    Thanks for the warm welcome sir - that's a beautiful animal in your avatar if I do say so myself *tips hat*. Also, Thanks for the link - that position does seem like it would suit me and it could indeed be a good way to get the foothold in Alaska I'm looking for. It seems like there may not be a lot of Trees around Bethel, but the whole focus on Dog Sledding that I have been reading about sounds pretty appealing. It's definitely worth further investigation...

    Best Regards,

    Brad in Wisconsin

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Brad,

    I think many of us who have been drawn to Alaska over the past years and decades have done so for similar reasons that you have. I also believe most of us have fallen short of what our dream was when we arrived to one extent or another, and on the other hand have often exceeded our wildest dreams in ways we couldnít have imagined.

    I hate to burst the self sufficiency bubble but Iíll make the bold statement that no one in Alaska lives a truly subsistence lifestyle and while it may seem counter intuitive there are probably some people working 40-80 hours a week on the road system that live more of a subsistence lifestyle than some of those out in the bush. There are very few parts of the state where you can get enough food and heat year round to survive completely on your own, and the further North and inland you head, the harder it is. You will need cash on hand and a means of generating cash. The state of Alaska has in the opinion of many been too generous in subsidizing the ďsubsistenceĒ lifestyle of many of the stateís residents and we tend to bristle at the thought of someone else coming up with the dream only to end up as another burden on the system. Everyone to one degree or another relies on modern conveniences and most of Alaska would be a horrible place to be located in the event we were cut off from the rest of the world for whatever reason(s).

    As a fellow Christian one of the toughest things for me to learn and accept and one Iím still struggling with is that I firmly believe that it is just as important if not of more important to be in a healthy communion with your fellow man than it is to be only in communion with Godís creation. If you study the lives of the ancient desert fathers and even more recent monks in Russia in the past centuries youíll find that even the hermits that spent decades in isolation still interacted with their fellow man both to benefit themselves and their fellow man into attaining salvation.

    The best plan is to come up for two years and see how you are suited to the land. After those two years youíll have a better understanding of the realities of living in Alaska, the reality of what land is available to purchase and whether or not itís a dream or nightmare.

    Another thing many of us have realized is that whatever it is we thought we were leaving behind that made us unhappy in the lower 48 followed us up here, as that unhappiness is inside of you. Alaska is like a woman, it can make you happier and sadder than you have ever been. But ultimately if you arrive in the state with a joyful heart, your joy will continue. If you arrive with a heavy heart, youíll find it is only further burdened. You can go to any community in Alaska and find people who are in love with life, and you can also find people that are miserable.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Brad, you really should read through the threads under this section of the forum. Not trying to be mean, but you sound like you have a distorted view of Alaska. Don't watch those "reality" TV shows on Alaska, they aren't real. Nobody completely subsists up here, you have to have money. Not to say it isn't better up here than other places, but you should get a better understanding of this place before heading up here. Again, there are many, many, posts on this forum that go into all aspects of life up here.

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    Hey Brad, good luck, you'll need it ....but seriously, don't let these guys bring ya down....TONS of people come up here in the summer, do a little fishin', little hikin', little boppin' around...most go back down to whence they came, but a few end up staying. A trial period, if you will; just keep an open mind, don't have too many expectations. Just find a place and let it work on you. You don't really need to find a "landowner", the biggest ones (the state and feds) will let you pitch your wigwam or wickiup or whatnot without too much fuss; for a little while, at least. Here's some names for your Googling pleasure, oughta get your juices going: Dick Proenneke, Heimo Korth, Seth Kantner, Nick Jans. Do some reading.
    "Ė Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Here is a video about Heimo and his Wife.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iq0rZ...3299DC95044CED
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    I'd say, "Read and Learn,...then Read and Learn, some More,....."

    there's a lot of information in these forums for getting an accurate picture for what you are wanting to do.
    but be willing to hear from everybody,...

    I agree with Paul H, in some cautions he's giving, some reality checks you should take seriously
    and as a dedicated Christian myself also, what he mentions on the isolation factor is real

    tho you may feel called to pull away,...look for an opportunity to Give, what you receive, or the stream will dry up ,.....
    Seasonal jobs work well for that
    the closest I came to pulling off what you mention, was some serious isolation, for several years, Part Time

    I was Commercial Fishing, for a few months at at time, then going back out to the woods for long stretches,
    so I could pay all my bills, come up with more spending money,
    for all the tools, upgrades,...that you Will Never be able to totally anticipate ahead of time,..you'll have to have money to make adjustments to what you thought you'd need originally
    But,... there was no way I would lose heart when the money was running out
    I'd just go back to the coast, work some more,....

    was spending as much as 9mo a year out in the woods,...it Was Fantastic,...best years of my life I think

    Hope you can pull it off,...but Come Ready To WORK

    PS: I would be Very Hesitant to come up hoping to pull off someone else for land to pitch your Tipi on
    that's a set-up for complications
    figure out a way to invest in your own little piece of land,..it's not really that expensive if remote,
    but Landownership, your Own land, will make all the difference
    Just keep working, or come up and Work like crazy, til you can get a plot of your own Dirt

    Here's a few pics of my scene from those days, on my own 5 acres
    that Tipi, made of Visqueen,...actually, thrown up in a day, worked for me way beyond my expectations
    I lived in that thing through the entire winter, twice,.....really, it was an awesome structure,....(but then I was pretty tough too)





    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Paul, why do you have to be so sensible? Where is your sense of adventure? Gesh! My family (in '84) drove to Alaska in a beat up car with $300, three kids, my parents and a dog that rode in the hatchback area with me. LOL! Alaska or bust! I remember my dad making us eat a can of beans so he could use it to fix the muffler. It was fun... You can spend your life saying 'what if' while you watch it pass on by or you can jump in and enjoy the ride.

    So Brad, why a Lakota Tipi? Are you Lakota (Sioux)? What area of the state are you looking at?. I'd look up farms and ranches throughout the state and see if anyone needs a summer hand; often they will put you up for labor exchange.

    KODIAK: Dang! Fantastic.. :-)

    (editing) lol! before I get in trouble.. ooppss..

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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Here is a video about Heimo and his Wife.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iq0rZ...3299DC95044CED
    That's a pretty cool video Steve, Thanks
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    If you have IT experience, you could look at jobs in school districts, native corps or city gov't in villages out west or up north (Dillingham, Bethel, King Salmon, Iliamna, Togiak, Nome, Kotz, Barrow.) once there you will have lots of opportunity to net and fish and hunt. When I lived in Dillingham it was not hard to have a freezer full of moose, salmon, ducks and grouse. Farming would be tough, but the gathering was excellent. These are unique places socially to say the least but it's a good start if you want to work AND get into subsistence activities. You can get a dry cabin in most of these and even a little out the road if you wish.

    I'm from Wausau myself, came up ten years ago, will never return to the midwest if I can help it. If you're not digging Milwaukee (I hated that town) then get a job, pack up, get up here and try it. If it's just you and the dog and since you have a marketable profession.....what's it gonna hurt?

    There are many successful midwesterners up here. (I have 5 immediate coworkers and supervisors from WI, several more from MI and MN, very few who have their umbilical cords buried in Alaska) I think that place preps you pretty well to deal with cruddy winters, but also the place has a good work ethic, a can do attitude, easily impressed (that's not an insult, it keeps you energized, I'm still easily impressed up here) are humble, and generally treat people really well. THese are all positives for the challenges that lie before you.

    I live in SouthEast now, and it's a good place too. Pricy, but nice with rich opportunities to harvest but it's not the same as subsistence rights in the village areas. It's a good place for me and it's a great place for my wife, I enjoyed my time in the bush but life drew me elsewhere.

    However, I call BS on that -40 talk......I spent the first 23 years of my life there and I doubt I ever saw ambient temps below -20 and it wasn't for long if it did. Windchills......rarely to -20 either.

    Good luck to ya. Scratch that road system talk from others, get out in the sticks and try to live it, if you don't make it, no big whoop, you will not be the first who doesn't dig it but you never know until you try.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post

    There are many successful midwesterners up here. (I have 5 immediate coworkers and supervisors from WI, several more from MI and MN, very few who have their umbilical cords buried in Alaska) I think that place preps you pretty well to deal with cruddy winters, but also the place has a good work ethic, a can do attitude, easily impressed (that's not an insult, it keeps you energized, I'm still easily impressed up here) are humble, and generally treat people really well. THese are all positives for the challenges that lie before you.,....

    Good luck to ya. Scratch that road system talk from others, get out in the sticks and try to live it, if you don't make it, no big whoop, you will not be the first who doesn't dig it but you never know until you try.
    I agree with this wholeheartedly, have a lot of Minnesota relatives,...several of my Aunts, Uncles, and Cousins have really prospered in the remote Alaska adjustment
    It's like, "they were already made for Alaskan Bush Life"
    the work ethic, etc. ,...(of course these were Farm Kids), but there is something about the Midwest mindset,
    that just doesn't quit easily

    and "Watch out for the Road System,"...I think a lot of folks get stuck there, with stable jobs and all,...
    when they had your dream at first approach
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakrain View Post
    I agree with this wholeheartedly, have a lot of Minnesota relatives,...several of my Aunts, Uncles, and Cousins have really prospered in the remote Alaska adjustment
    It's like, "they were already made for Alaskan Bush Life"
    the work ethic, etc. ,...(of course these were Farm Kids), but there is something about the Midwest mindset,
    that just doesn't quit easily

    and "Watch out for the Road System,"...I think a lot of folks get stuck there, with stable jobs and all,...
    when they had your dream at first approach
    Came off of a ginseng farm myself, dad had another full time job so we had lights on the tractors to work after he got home on week nights.... Have never worked so much or so hard since. Lots of my relatives would do well up here as well, but one bad part of the midwest is there are two kinds of midwesterners, the ones that never leave, and the ones that leave and never come back. My relatives won't be be leaving anytime soon, but they do everything from berries to deer camps, trap, fish and collect maple syrup, run horses etc. Pretty hardy folks.....and colorful

    +2 for avoiding the road system for what the OP is looking for. It costs as much to move from ANC to DLG as it does from WI to DLG.....so make the move once and call it good til you know what you want.....don't compromise on this if you really want it because as said once you get established in Matsu or somewhere, you will unlikely make the jump.

    Some outside folks really thrive socially and physically in bush communities. I did well physically, but while I had a few great friends and fair number of good ones, I couldn't look past some of the rough aspects of bush communities (maybe again part of the midwest in me....things can be black and white back there and some are just NOT right and NOT to be tolerated) but I know others who take it in stride or find a way to isolate themselves.

    So Brad, Go For It.........but just don't do it half-azzed. If you got nothing tying you down then by all means give it a shot. If you end up on the road, you could stand the chance of still having that regret of not taking a stab at what you want. I went from bumble southern Illinois straight to Bethel and later Dillingham, it was sink or swim and when taking a shot like you are proposing, no one will give you any heck about the result.

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    Similiar to what a few others said/hinted to:
    There is alot of IT jobs posting up for hire n AK right now. I just got this information from the Fort Richardson ACAP office 2 days ago. I was there looking to possibly post 2 IT jobs for my company. Our 2 positions aren't happening now. So get a resume together and strart looking at AK jobs. Depending on your qualifications and desired income, you could start in or near Anchorage, or Semi-Remote, like Fort Greely, or even more remote like Nome (see Catch it's list). Then your here with a paycheck and can execute on your own.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Brad,

    I think many of us who have been drawn to Alaska over the past years and decades have done so for similar reasons that you have. I also believe most of us have fallen short of what our dream was when we arrived to one extent or another, and on the other hand have often exceeded our wildest dreams in ways we couldnít have imagined.

    I hate to burst the self sufficiency bubble but Iíll make the bold statement that no one in Alaska lives a truly subsistence lifestyle and while it may seem counter intuitive there are probably some people working 40-80 hours a week on the road system that live more of a subsistence lifestyle than some of those out in the bush. There are very few parts of the state where you can get enough food and heat year round to survive completely on your own, and the further North and inland you head, the harder it is. You will need cash on hand and a means of generating cash. The state of Alaska has in the opinion of many been too generous in subsidizing the ďsubsistenceĒ lifestyle of many of the stateís residents and we tend to bristle at the thought of someone else coming up with the dream only to end up as another burden on the system. Everyone to one degree or another relies on modern conveniences and most of Alaska would be a horrible place to be located in the event we were cut off from the rest of the world for whatever reason(s).

    As a fellow Christian one of the toughest things for me to learn and accept and one Iím still struggling with is that I firmly believe that it is just as important if not of more important to be in a healthy communion with your fellow man than it is to be only in communion with Godís creation. If you study the lives of the ancient desert fathers and even more recent monks in Russia in the past centuries youíll find that even the hermits that spent decades in isolation still interacted with their fellow man both to benefit themselves and their fellow man into attaining salvation.

    The best plan is to come up for two years and see how you are suited to the land. After those two years youíll have a better understanding of the realities of living in Alaska, the reality of what land is available to purchase and whether or not itís a dream or nightmare.

    Another thing many of us have realized is that whatever it is we thought we were leaving behind that made us unhappy in the lower 48 followed us up here, as that unhappiness is inside of you. Alaska is like a woman, it can make you happier and sadder than you have ever been. But ultimately if you arrive in the state with a joyful heart, your joy will continue. If you arrive with a heavy heart, youíll find it is only further burdened. You can go to any community in Alaska and find people who are in love with life, and you can also find people that are miserable.
    Paul, firstly: thank you very much for your insightful and thought-provoking post. I had to digest a lot of what you said before I felt I could respond adequately, and I sense a lot of hard-won truth in what you are saying. I'm particularly interested in your comments about the feelings of Alaskans toward newcomers and their subsistence living aspirations, I assume by 'burden on the system' you mean effectively, "more and more people taking away from a system with a finite amount of resources", or do you instead mean that many people come up there with these grand ideas only to become the newest govervnment welfare receipients...or both? I agree that Alaska might be a horrible place to be if cut-off from modern conveniences, if modern conveniences are a corner-stone of your lifestyle, but it does beg the question to which I'm unsure of the answer: how did Alaskan 'natives' make it for hundreds of years before such conveniences existed? I don't hope to live in a cave wearing a hair shirt, mind you, but I do want to strike a more genuine balance between convenience and reality - the availability of convenience being something I take for granted personally, I fear its future effervecence is in question as I witness what's transpiring in our society today. I understand what you are saying about isolation from your fellow man, it's possible I didn't make my intent clear in that I'm not looking to shun society.... No, I want to be part of it and in turn contribute to a good community, it's just that I want to surround myself with people of a mindset more similar to my own, who may have done some of the things I've only dreamed about. I do feel like I have a lot to offer, and maybe that resulting fellowship can help me further some of my other goals in life, such as starting a Dog Training School and starting an onsite PC repair service for people living in rural areas. I really like your comment about how Alaska is like a woman -- that's a really interesting way to put things and it's a good analogy to dwell on - I think you are right in that "Wherever you go, There you are". I wont lie to you: My motivations are driven by this intense feeling inside that I need to make a change, so in a way I feel like I need to 'escape' aspects of my current life because they are not healthy nor sustainable. At the same time I want to do so for the right reasons, and not fall prey to the whole "grass is greener" conundrum. I'm not sure if I'll ever sort that out... but regardless of the purity of my reasoning it's difficult to push such strong emotions aside, which is what ultimately led me here to this forum.

    Thank you Paul for taking the time to share your insight, I really appreciate your support,
    Brad In Wisconsin

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    Quote Originally Posted by brad_and_gemma View Post
    how did Alaskan 'natives' make it for hundreds of years before such conveniences existed?
    They migrated following food sources, this allowed them to harvest resources as they became available and to not over harvest any one area. Most now are no longer willing to live this nomad lifestyle other than maybe fish camps. Also modern fish and game laws now restrict the amount of fish and game that can be harvested. Watch the video about Heimo and you will hear talk about having several cabins and moving to follow food with the seasons. Many also starved to death!!! One such dreamer starved to death just off the road system, heck he was only a days walk from the road. Read "Into the wild"
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

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    Quote Originally Posted by NRick View Post
    Brad, you really should read through the threads under this section of the forum. Not trying to be mean, but you sound like you have a distorted view of Alaska. Don't watch those "reality" TV shows on Alaska, they aren't real. Nobody completely subsists up here, you have to have money. Not to say it isn't better up here than other places, but you should get a better understanding of this place before heading up here. Again, there are many, many, posts on this forum that go into all aspects of life up here.
    Hi NRick, thanks for your thoughts. It's quite possible and even likely that my views of Alaska have been tainted by the trappings of reality TV and the stories of people like Dick P. Part of the reason I am here is to do away with any misconceptions I have and reign in any false expectations. I think this is a great forum for me to do exactly that, and I appreciate you all letting me participate here. Judging from other posts here, it sounds like the Abundance of Wildlife in Alaska is drastically over-stated - which is one misconception that I'm dealing with today. It sounds like I have a lot more to learn indeed,

    Thanks for taking the time to reply to my post, and kind regards,
    Brad in Wisconsin

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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Hey Brad, good luck, you'll need it ....but seriously, don't let these guys bring ya down....TONS of people come up here in the summer, do a little fishin', little hikin', little boppin' around...most go back down to whence they came, but a few end up staying. A trial period, if you will; just keep an open mind, don't have too many expectations. Just find a place and let it work on you. You don't really need to find a "landowner", the biggest ones (the state and feds) will let you pitch your wigwam or wickiup or whatnot without too much fuss; for a little while, at least. Here's some names for your Googling pleasure, oughta get your juices going: Dick Proenneke, Heimo Korth, Seth Kantner, Nick Jans. Do some reading.
    Hi cdubbin, thanks for commenting. "just keep and open mind, don't have too many expectations"... I'm hearing that a lot, which tells me that's a lot better advice than I realize, and something in my best interest to actually do. It's good to know that one can pretty much post up on Federal land 'wherever they want' for short stints so long as they respectfully obey the rules and move frequently... I suspect there's quite a few people living quasi-nomadic lives and doing exactly that, in Alaska and elsewhere for that matter. While I don't know that this is exactly what I'm looking for in the long run, in would be in interesting exercise in mental, physical and spiritual fortitude without a doubt. I salute any person who has done something like that in their life, even if only temporarily.

    Stay Warm,

    Brad in Wisconsin

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