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Thread: Family Flees to Siberia Wilderness

  1. #1

    Default Family Flees to Siberia Wilderness

    On January 29th, 2013, the Smithsonian Magazine published an amazing story about an Old Believer family living without human contact for over 40 years.

    In 1936, after his brother was murdered by communists, Karp Lykov fled with his wife and two children to a narrow, forested mountain valley in Siberia, 100 miles from Mongolia, and 150 miles from the nearest settlement.

    At first they were a family of four, then two more children were born in the wilderness. It was a very difficult existence. In the particularly difficult year of 1961, a snowfall in June killed almost everything in their garden. Karpís wife, Akulina died of starvation that year so that her children would survive. Five of the family still survived by the time their homestead was discovered by a geologic expedition in 1978.

    They had no firearms or even bows. They had to rely on traps or running animals to exhaustion. One of the sons as a young man, developed amazing endurance and skill as a woodsman. He would go out for several days in winter sometimes bringing home an elk for the family.

    They had no salt, and no ability to replace metal cookware which had worn or rusted out. They went barefoot or wore birch bark footwear. Their cabin was a very modest structure with a single tiny window. Nevertheless, they were very resourceful in making do with what they had or could create.

    Apparently, one of the daughters, the last surviving member of the family, still lives there to this day.

    You can read the whole story at this web address:

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/histor...188843001.html

  2. #2
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Wow...thanks for the good read.
    BK

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Cool stuff, rifleman; I heard o' some folk in Alaska that lived that way for like 30,000 years On a side note: the article says they hunted "elk". Think they meant moose?
    "Ė Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    I remember having lunch (boiled whole smelt, Pilot Bread, Kool-Aid) in an elder's home in Koliganek, AK on the Nushagak River in the early 80's. I talked local history with my host, perhaps 85 years old and who was reputed to have run down caribou on foot as a young hunter. He told me he and other young hunters did do that, using stamina and endurance to keep pushing the caribou until the animals were so exhausted they could be killed by knife. If you have any experience walking, let alone running, on tundra you will appreciate what a feat this must have been. It often took tens of miles and was pointless if he got lost. He then had to bring the meat back to the village, of course, but others helped after he came into the village with the first quarter. My host lost me in telling how he would mark the trail for others to find the game, but there was some method they all followed.

    I worked in the schools of the villages of the Togiak, Nushagak, and Kvichak drainages from '82 through '90, and was so grateful that I was there to know and learn from the elders at that time who had lived the old ways, before snow go's, oil heat, and modern arms.

    Certainly, for newcomers to learn and adapt and succeed alone as in the article was perhaps all the more remarkable.

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    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Cool stuff, rifleman; I heard o' some folk in Alaska that lived that way for like 30,000 years On a side note: the article says they hunted "elk". Think they meant moose?
    Yeah over there European elk means moose



    Release Lake Trout

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    Good read!

    Sattelites and the "grid" being above, will prevent this from happening in modern times.

    Soon as big brother and uncle Sam find out your there, and not paying "taxes" for the burden of your existence... illegally taking "game" without "reporting" to the commandant... on top of living "squatting" on the "public" land... they will come....

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Wow. I wonder if there are any more out there.
    Live life and love it
    Love life and live it

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    A canadian magazine called vice sent someone out to visit the last remaining woman and put the documentary on youtube.
    Part 1:
    http://youtu.be/rj2snCZugGA
    Part 2:
    http://youtu.be/S2nTmmOeLe8
    Part 3:
    http://youtu.be/YAkp9ODiLbc
    Part 4:
    http://youtu.be/ME7F-KBpNk8

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by bullbuster View Post
    Wow. I wonder if there are any more out there.
    You can be assured that somewhere, somebody is living undetected:

    http://history1900s.about.com/od/wor...oldiersurr.htm

    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/05/2...ts-in-freezer/

    http://www.news10.net/news/local/sto...x?storyid=8282

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nati...icle-1.1116604

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brain View Post
    You can be assured that somewhere, somebody is living undetected:
    ......and right here in AK. I'm sure.......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    ......and right here in AK. I'm sure.......
    I have no doubt about it, especially in SE.

    But the most amazing stories are those where people do it amongst millions. I can't find a link to the story, but some time in the 1960's a man was found living in a little hovel in the brush in 160 acre Washington Park in Portland, Oregon, and officials were shocked to learn that the man had lived there for over a dozen years.

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    Thanks for the great read! in the comments, someone mentioned reading the book. Anybody know anything about the book?

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    Took the 40 minutes to watch the videos very cool.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Quote Originally Posted by bullbuster View Post
    Wow. I wonder if there are any more out there.
    There was one very recent in North Carolina.....if I remember right he lived there quite a long time, i.e. years & would steel food from a nearby Church group camp ground....

  15. #15

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    It has been said that the best place to hide is in a crowd...............

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