Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Preserving the catch

  1. #1

    Default Preserving the catch

    Iíve heard some talk of always eating certain fish and game fresh and not freezing it. Should Grayling, Cutthroat, and Dollies be eaten fresh? And how about small game like Rabbits, Hare, Grouse and Ptarmigan? I have never harvested an abundance of any so it was a feast enjoyed that day or the next.

    If you do preserve it, what methods do you use?

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Homer, Alaska
    Posts
    76

    Default

    We freeze rabbits and grouse all the time. They seem to hold well in the freezer. As far as grayling and trout, I am with you on eating them as soon as possible. They do freeze but taste so much better fresh. If I do have to put them up I vacuum seal them or I have even tossed them in the smoker, well trout, haven't tried that on a grayling as I rarely ever get them. I would guess canned trout would be ok as well, make a pseudo salmon salad sandwich! I'm getting hungry now!

  3. #3
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    Haven't harvested any large numbers of hare in recent years. not like we used to when the boys were growing up at home. When we used to harvest decent numbers of hare, we'd clean them, the wife would cut them up (similar to chicken), we'd double wrap them and freeze them. Later on We began using a vacuum packer, and then freeze them for indefinite periods. Grayling do not keep well no matter how they are prepared and frozen. When thawed out they turn to mush. To enjoy a pan fried grayling, it needs to be cooked no later than the next day. Dollies and Rainbows keep fairly well when vacuum packed and frozen. But I wouldn't count on any long term storage.

  4. #4
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,117

    Default

    Ptarmigan do well vacuum packed from my experience.
    BK

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    2,127

    Default

    +1 for the grayling, trout and dollies.....I tried freezing char when I first got to Bristol Bay (there are lots of em) and was sorely disappointed in their shelf life. Grouse will freeze okay, it's just hard to keep all the air out and not poke holes with bones etc, but I have frozen them for up to 4-6 months. Same goes for ducks.

    I try to eat my salmon within 4-6 months, after that it loses it's luster and doesn't really smoke as well.

    Halibut good for a year.

  6. #6

    Default

    Had a meat class at the University of Idaho and asked my professor similar questions like this one. Should certain meats(animals, bird,fish,etc...) be frozen, or should meat that's has been froze, then thawed, be frozen again. His answer was always the same. He said "How does the meat know it has been frozen"

    it is always best to eat fresh, but I have always had good luck freezing all of Gods tasty creatures.

  7. #7

    Default

    We freeze our small game and fish in water. It will not freezer burn if covered in water and will keep longer. We reuse milk cartons and use zip lock bags also and get all the air out before sealing.

  8. #8
    Member pacific-23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Sitka, Ak
    Posts
    306

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akkingfisher View Post
    Had a meat class at the University of Idaho and asked my professor similar questions like this one. Should certain meats(animals, bird,fish,etc...) be frozen, or should meat that's has been froze, then thawed, be frozen again. His answer was always the same. He said "How does the meat know it has been frozen"

    it is always best to eat fresh, but I have always had good luck freezing all of Gods tasty creatures.
    How does the meat know? The texture and flavor are dead giveaways due to the cells being ruptured by the formation of ice crystals in the flesh. This effect can be minimized by increasing the rate of temperature drop (blast freezing) however on a cellular level the meat will never be the same as fresh. Multiple freeze cycles will only cause this problem to be exacerbated. I too freeze lots of product every year and enjoy it immensely, but saying the meat doesn't change (at least a little) is inaccurate.

  9. #9
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    4,886

    Default

    If you debone a bird breast they are easy to vac seal and do keep well for a few months.
    Deboneing a bird breast only takes a minute at the most.
    Rabbits I cut up similar to a chicken
    and vac seal. They keep for a few months as well.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  10. #10
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,835

    Default

    When I was a young lad in school I would hang out in town friday night finding a 21+er to buy me a 12 pack of barley pop. Then I would head to a little creek the next day to fish for brook trout and camp for saturday night. There were also rainbows and locklaven (brown trout) and suckers in the stream. Mostly brookies at the head and the big lockies down lower in the brushed up stream. This was in Central Montana. I would take the little brooks home and freeze them in 1/2 gallon paper milk cartons. Fill it fairly full of brookies, then fill with water and freeze. They kept almost as good as fresh - almost...very good compared to not submerging them in water.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •