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Thread: MIRACLE MONTH IN ALASKA....Hunting stories from the early 1900's

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Default MIRACLE MONTH IN ALASKA....Hunting stories from the early 1900's

    I remember sending this link to myself because at that time I didn't have time to read it. Don't know how I came about it, and it could very well be from here on the forum. So if it's already here somewhere then just delete, but I thought some of you would like a pretty good read. At the bottom of the page you can click to read other stories of the past....


    http://www.epagepub.com/display_article.php?id=605049
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member Trapak's Avatar
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    Enjoyed the read, 4merguide. Reminds me of Alaska/Yukon Trophies Won & Lost. Different era and tough guys for sure. Thanks for sharing.

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    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
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    1916 hunting trip...
    This trip from Seward to the country between Skilak and Tustumena is quite typical of its time for a guided hunt.






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    Great read! It's kinda funny how the guides roll has changed to babysitter/pamperer these days. Now it's all about the great food and hospitality.

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    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
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    Okay here's another I uploaded to photobucket a while back. I used to collect old sporting magazines that have articles about the Kenai Peninsula from the late 1800's up to about 1940. Out of the 50 magazines in the collection I think this is the best one...its another 1916 hunt.

    The record seems to show changes in the guided hunting style on the Kenai. The earliest recordings were of Andrew Berg on Tustumena, then it shifted to hunts that were based out of Seward using the Kenai River drainage as a conduit, finally motorized boats and airplanes and horses led to a different era from the mid 1920's on...

    I hope the link works...its an awesome story. It goes far beyond hunting...these people were adventurers.

    http://s1105.beta.photobucket.com/us...09671170655639

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    Member jaydog's Avatar
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    Great stories! Thanks for sharing these. Pretty cool to read these. Interesting to read these and think about my great grandad moving his family to northern Michigan via horse and wagon and homesteading land up there at approximately the same time. No gasoline engines for him - but I'd bet that it was an economic thing more than anything else.

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    Jake Jefferson and I actually used an old Coleman stove last Spring that had belonged to Oscar Vogel. It was in an old cabin that had been built in 1949(according to the engravings on the beams). It was amazing that it was still usable and the fuel still ignitable. It is really cool to read of his exploits especially since Jake had worked at Stephan Lake years ago. We were a couple ridges over from Stephan Lake hunting grizzly. Oscar had better luck than we had but at least we did not have to sleep under a tree!!!

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alottabs View Post
    Oscar had better luck than we had but at least we did not have to sleep under a tree!!!
    That thing about the dead tree keeping you dryer than a live green tree kinda had me stumped. Granted that it would probably soak up water pretty good. All I could think was that it must have been a pretty darn big tree......lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    I read the first story. I am looking forward to reading the others. Since I am inexperienced.. what is it like to be a guide now? This is what I think of when I think of a guide. Now is it all changed because of customer service standards and the entitlement people feel?

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainGirl View Post
    I read the first story. I am looking forward to reading the others. Since I am inexperienced.. what is it like to be a guide now? This is what I think of when I think of a guide. Now is it all changed because of customer service standards and the entitlement people feel?
    When I was guiding, out of all the people I guided, I only had a couple that felt "entitled". Meaning......they didn't come right out and say it, but, felt because they were paying the big bucks they shouldn't have to do anything.....meaning no helping when it came to cooking, cleaning, packing meat, etc... Other than those few, most were good about wanting to be a part of the whole experience. Most would want to help in any way they could.

    I would imagine that the one big thing that has changed over time was, although I did my fair share of hiking, because we could get in pretty close to the game with super cups, I never had to hike anywhere near the distances at one time, like you read in the first story, to even get TO the game. In those days, getting the trophy "head" was pretty much first and foremost. Because of the extremely long treks to get to game, I would imagine a lot of meat was left in the bush. In fact, in the first story there was mention of that. Nowadays they'll hang ya if they catch you doing that.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
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    Douglas Burden guided by Lucas.

    Burden went on to write a book about his exploits called Look To The Wilderness and it goes into more depth about his Kenai trip and if you get the chance you might want to look at it.





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    Quote Originally Posted by tustumena_lake View Post
    Douglas Burden guided by Lucas.

    Burden went on to write a book about his exploits called Look To The Wilderness and it goes into more depth about his Kenai trip and if you get the chance you might want to look at it.





    Tlake you are a treasure around here and this forum is lucky to have you being part of it. I am in awe of everyone of your posts and knowledge on the history of the peninsula.. I can only hope to have the pleasure of meeting you and sharing a story or two...

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    VERY cool stuff, Tusty; those musta been the days, alright.....when men wore wool and leather, and bulls wore 70-inch racks! Also, when hunting articles were essays on camaraderie and the wonders of the natural world, 'stead of glorified ads for guns, ammo, optics, clothing, and guides.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Thanks for posting these!

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Great adventures for sure. The ugly little secret, and I hesitate to bring it up, is that a lot of this hunting is what spawned our current wanton waste laws. There was no way to care for all those animals killed like we do today. Then again, the same was true of much hunting at the time with the lack of refrigeration etc. People had a different perspective back then and it's neither right nor wrong.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Great adventures for sure. The ugly little secret, and I hesitate to bring it up, is that a lot of this hunting is what spawned our current wanton waste laws. There was no way to care for all those animals killed like we do today. Then again, the same was true of much hunting at the time with the lack of refrigeration etc. People had a different perspective back then and it's neither right nor wrong.
    That's what I was thinking. Absolutely no mention of packing meat except for the one taste the first story mentions.

    Definitely different times......when the first article railed against the commercial moose hunter and settlers shooting them for meat thus messing up the herds for head hunting.....that kinda chapped my bum.

    Anyone else notice the mention of the burned forests in the first story......probably not much of that in these areas anymore......or herds of large bulls walking around.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    They usually ate the sheep meat, seldom ate black bear meat, and rarely ate any of the moose meat, because they shot the biggest moose they could find at the height of the rut. They were mostly head hunters in those days unless shooting for "camp meat" to be used for immediate consumption.

    Another dirty little secret of our time is that some folks who shoot the biggest moose they can find for the biggest rack they can get won't eat much of the meat either, though it may spend time in their freezer.

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    What's funny though is that with the amount of calories these boys burned doing all this hiking and packing and rowing.....they could eat about half of what they shot before the trip was over

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    What's funny though is that with the amount of calories these boys burned doing all this hiking and packing and rowing.....they could eat about half of what they shot before the trip was over
    I am reading a book called "In the Shadow of Mount McKinley" by William Beach. He describes some of the supplies they brought on their expeditions, including cans of smoked clams. Those boys ate a lot of backstrap too, but not much else on a game animal.

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    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
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    This next hunting story is in film format. Art Young (Pope and Young) came to Alaska in the 1920's and at least for the Kenai portion he was guided by Hank Lucas. That portion of the hunt is shown starting around 8:30. Hunters from outside the territory of Alaska were required by law to have a registered guide in the Kenai District. This is an awesome documentary and covers many locales and subjects.



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