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Thread: Primitive Survival

  1. #1
    AniWahaya
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    Default Primitive Survival

    Tools, shelter, edibles, smoking, drying, tanning, containment, refrigeration, water storage etc. ?

    Salt water to drinkable water:

    Fill pot up 1/3 way with salt water; place glass in center; cover with lid upside down so evaporation drips into glass; Heat

  2. #2
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    What a great idea, what type of salt should I add to the water?

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    In your scenario you have no fresh water but a pot and glass? I think you need to go outside and play.....
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  4. #4
    AniWahaya
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    In your scenario you have no fresh water but a pot and glass? I think you need to go outside and play.....
    LOL, fine I get your point.. Do you have something to add? You can turn your piss into water using the same concept with whatever you have. More in a situation of being on the big water.

    You can use Alder as a tanning solution due to the acidic qualities, only hair off I think..

    Dandelion root, ground with that great pee evaporation makes almost a coffee substance ;-)

    You can eat chickweed

    The intestines of an animal can be used to store bear fat

    More, or is this a dead thread?

  5. #5
    AniWahaya
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    What a great idea, what type of salt should I add to the water?
    Ever heard of an ocean? It sorta covers 70% of the earth's surface.. Wow, I never thought I'd get a response like this in a survival topic when it comes to turning salt water into drinking water haha.. That's like the basic of the basics..

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    ........Deleted by AGL4now............

  7. #7
    AniWahaya
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Your talking to people who's idea of survival gear is a bottle of cheap liquor and a candy bar.
    Well, I was trying to play off the thread you started to get an idea of people's knowledge etc.. I'm the first to say I don't know much and would love to learn more tips and tricks in re to.

  8. #8
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AniWahaya View Post
    LOL, fine I get your point.. Do you have something to add? You can turn your piss into water using the same concept with whatever you have. More in a situation of being on the big water.

    You can use Alder as a tanning solution due to the acidic qualities, only hair off I think..

    Dandelion root, ground with that great pee evaporation makes almost a coffee substance ;-)

    You can eat chickweed

    The intestines of an animal can be used to store bear fat

    More, or is this a dead thread?
    No I think it's a good thread, I just hadn't made fun of anyone yet today, and you were in the line of fire.... You can use spruce roots for cordage; they're long and strong and stringy and grow just under the surface. Dig some up and make a bunny snare or fishnet. Use wood ash to dehair hides, then tan with brains, liver, smoke and more elbow grease than you could possibly believe. Birch bark for containers. There's lots of yummy edibles in the Alaska woods, some of which, like morel mushrooms and fiddlehead ferns, are world-class fare. They are also tre seasonable.
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  9. #9
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AniWahaya View Post
    LOL, fine I get your point.. Do you have something to add? You can turn your piss into water using the same concept with whatever you have.
    ?
    Did you know you can fill your handy dandy pot with snow and melt it and get drinking water? Without having to play with your piss? You can also melt snow or boil water in a plastic bottle too...



    Release Lake Trout

  10. #10
    AniWahaya
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt&FishAK View Post
    Did you know you can fill your handy dandy pot with snow and melt it and get drinking water? Without having to play with your piss? You can also melt snow or boil water in a plastic bottle too...
    I guess I need to spell this v e r y slow... s a l t w a t e r... No comprende? Like in the big blue water body called the o c e a n..
    I did know you can boil water in a plastic bottle though.. Uhh.. Probably not the best way.
    Boiling water does not remove salt.. In Ak we are fortunate ON LAND to have plentiful water.. Indeed.. My post was simply an example!

  11. #11
    AniWahaya
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    No I think it's a good thread, I just hadn't made fun of anyone yet today, and you were in the line of fire.... You can use spruce roots for cordage; they're long and strong and stringy and grow just under the surface. Dig some up and make a bunny snare or fishnet. Use wood ash to dehair hides, then tan with brains, liver, smoke and more elbow grease than you could possibly believe. Birch bark for containers. There's lots of yummy edibles in the Alaska woods, some of which, like morel mushrooms and fiddlehead ferns, are world-class fare. They are also tre seasonable.
    Great information.. I never thought about the spruce roots being used in such a fashion. I did have some fiddle head fern dip that was to die for, it's on my list for spring.
    LOL why is everyone picking on me?

  12. #12
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    What's a O C E A N mean?

    I live by a big body of blue water, but it ain't salty!

    We jus messing around.... Givin ya crap. R E L A X. The more it bugs you the more picked on your gonna get lol.....

    Jus kidding but yeah I just had to chime in.... Hope I didn't ruin your thread, it's a good one.



    Release Lake Trout

  13. #13
    AniWahaya
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt&FishAK View Post
    What's a O C E A N mean?

    I live by a big body of blue water, but it ain't salty!

    We jus messing around.... Givin ya crap. R E L A X. The more it bugs you the more picked on your gonna get lol.....

    Jus kidding but yeah I just had to chime in.... Hope I didn't ruin your thread, it's a good one.
    Yes, I know.. After 3 years of it hee hee I know the game - it's no bother to me but I am truly interested in more knowledge re the topic so please share what you can.

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AniWahaya View Post
    I guess I need to spell this v e r y slow... s a l t w a t e r... No comprende? Like in the big blue water body called the o c e a n..
    I did know you can boil water in a plastic bottle though.. Uhh.. Probably not the best way.
    Boiling water does not remove salt.. In Ak we are fortunate ON LAND to have plentiful water.. Indeed.. My post was simply an example!
    thats another great thing about alaska, if you are near salt water, there is no shortage of fresh water...be it rain, snow, streams etc, etc, etc.

  15. #15
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    You can get clear water out of a braided river if you have a bit of time to spare. Find a low gravel bar; one where the ground is only a few inches above the water line, and dig a hole deep enough for your container to avoid touching bottom. Generally, muddy gravel bars are best because the ground doesn't crumble as easily. Hydraulic pressure will fill the hole and the mud and sand will filter it, but you want to wait for an hour or two for the dirt stirred up in the digging to settle out. Once clear, the hole will stay clear until disturbed.

    The best, natural tinder in Alaska for catching a spark is scraped birch bark. Medium sized trees with clear bark in the 5"-12" range are best. Don't peel the tree. Hold your knife flat and level as if you were going to cut the tree and lightly scrape the bark straight down into your other hand. Press the blade hard enough to make coffee grounds sized scrapings. About a tablespoon is usually enough. *Note--Do this step last! AFTER you've collected your fuel wood and kindling. Protect your little pile from wind and set them on your base. One stroke on a typical metal match usually produces flame at any temperature.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  16. #16
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AniWahaya View Post
    Ever heard of an ocean? It sorta covers 70% of the earth's surface.. Wow, I never thought I'd get a response like this in a survival topic when it comes to turning salt water into drinking water haha.. That's like the basic of the basics..
    Actually it's a VERY good thing to know. Especially if you happen to get stranded somewhere it gets very hot. You can do the same thing by digging a whole in the ground, use anything that will hold water, even a large leaf, fill it with the salt water, put something to catch your clean water in in the middle, cover with a piece of visqueen/tarp, put a small rock in the center to aim the condensed water to your cup and let it do it's thing. It takes time but it does work.

    Also, if you have something that you can boil the salt water in and create a way to catch the steam and catch it into something you can drink from is another very good way....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by AniWahaya View Post

    I am truly interested in more knowledge re the topic so please share what you can.

    I see you have a young man.........I encourage people with children to get them helping build debris at age three. Starting with them fetching sticks and watching you build debris shelters. As they get older explain the different methods & styles of debris shelters. Build them year around, they think it is fun & it is outdoors. It teaches them that they don't have to fear the wilderness. It teaches them you don't have to die if your lost or stranded. It also teaches them about picking location for construction. It teaches them that they have to start construction "X' amount of time before dark. My advise is don't learn primitive "tricks". Learn your child to be one with the wilderness, and you will be compelled to become the teacher.


    The wilderness can change a man............
    __________________________________________________ ________________
    There is a real transformation that can metamorphose within a man who is alone in the wilderness. He can exit the wilderness fragile, very fragile, he is no longer sure where that which is himself ends and that which is not himself starts.

    Everything is kind of fuzzy, and has a softness about it, all things appear slightly blurred to the eye, like after one has been crying, and it can be hard to distinguish where one object stops and another object starts.

    He feels weak and vulnerable, but centered. In fact he is stronger, but the feeling of weakness, and vulnerability comes from the loss of arrogance.

    There is a clarity about the perfection of everything. Sounds are crisper, colors are different, there are so many more (new) colors now.

    He feels as if he is looking through things and through people, this is a very uncomfortable experience, he tries to focus, but he just looks through everything.

    Part of him wants to go back to the way it was, before being alone in the wilderness. But he also enjoys the bliss of how it is now. He wants to weep for no reason, but for the perfection of everything.

    He has change, and can not change back to that which he was before, being alone in the wilderness.

    I know not of drugs, but being alone in the wilderness, for long periods will change your perception of the universe. The universe is the same, but you have shifted to a place where you can see, with new eyes, a new heart, and a new empathy for all life. You have been born a second time, and are a child of the wilderness.

    There was a time long ago, that a man was encouraged to go into the wilderness alone for a extended period, so that he might find wisdom about life. Sad it is discouraged today. Welcome home....welcome home. Home from the wilderness, for he is free to return at any time to his true nature.

  18. #18
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    I see you have a young man.........I encourage people with children to get them helping build debris at age three. Starting with them fetching sticks and watching you build debris shelters. As they get older explain the different methods & styles of debris shelters. Build them year around, they think it is fun & it is outdoors. It teaches them that they don't have to fear the wilderness. It teaches them you don't have to die if your lost or stranded. It also teaches them about picking location for construction. It teaches them that they have to start construction "X' amount of time before dark.,....

    There was a time long ago, that a man was encouraged to go into the wilderness alone for a extended period, so that he might find wisdom about life. Sad it is discouraged today.,....
    That's good stuff AGL, especially this last line I quoted from yours

    is a good reminder of the priority of the young ones, help them realize that, "Wilderness is good, you don't have to die out there"

    Thanks
    (guess I gotta spread Rep pts more,)
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  19. #19
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakrain View Post
    That's good stuff AGL, especially this last line I quoted from yours

    is a good reminder of the priority of the young ones, help them realize that, "Wilderness is good, you don't have to die out there"

    Thanks
    I remember a TV show where they took "problem" kids out into the wilderness. It was amazing what a lot of those kids found out about themselves. It saddens me that millions and millions of kids today have neither the will or desire to get out into the woods. But I don't blame them, as there parents probably didn't either.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  20. #20

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    I wish I could have been brought up with these skills. AKHippie was telling me last night back when he went to school wilderness survival was a required course. That is not even offered at any of the East Coast schools I went too. I went to schools in North Carolina, Florida, Ohio and Connecticut, So I think that covers a lot of all over the East Coast. I recently found "Alaska Tracking and Traditional Skills School, LLC" in Fairbanks. I would like to take some classes there. While I would love to just already know this stuff and/or read about it.. I do my best learning from hands-on and someone showing me. I feel so wet behind the ears with all of you experienced people being a grown woman versus a child learning. I am absorbing this stuff like a sponge though. I have the wisdom to know I won't ever know it all.. but I am sure going to try! I recently acquired Tom Brown's books and was blessed to take a class from him and Tommy back in December. Someday I won’t be a cheechako anymore.. but a got a little while for that to happen!

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