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Thread: Lets talk TENTS

  1. #1

    Default Lets talk TENTS

    I took a brief look through the supply at sportsman. Im looking for a tent to pretty much do it all here. Im not sure where to start or what quality to go for. I have seen the 500+ dollar budget in these, but not sure how much there worth it. The tent Im looking for must be packable. Im poor and my feet and my quad is all i forsee getting me anywhere except one drop off sheep hunt within my three year term here that I sold my self-respect to my wife for. So I need a tent to work for just about all our adventers from the Artic conditions to summertime camping. Does it exist. I know some of the four season tents in the 400 -500 range might be recomended. but do they work in extreme cold conditions. If not how cold do they go.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dakota boy View Post
    I took a brief look through the supply at sportsman. Im looking for a tent to pretty much do it all here. Im not sure where to start or what quality to go for. I have seen the 500+ dollar budget in these, but not sure how much there worth it. The tent Im looking for must be packable. Im poor and my feet and my quad is all i forsee getting me anywhere except one drop off sheep hunt within my three year term here that I sold my self-respect to my wife for. So I need a tent to work for just about all our adventers from the Artic conditions to summertime camping. Does it exist. I know some of the four season tents in the 400 -500 range might be recomended. but do they work in extreme cold conditions. If not how cold do they go.
    For a one tent to do it all- a 4 season mountaineering tent is about the best game in town. I've got a Bibler Fitzroy and it's just bombproof- takes high wind, heavy snow, hard rain with ease. Not the lightest tent and certainly not the cheapest- but it works for anything.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    I bought one of the browning glacier extreme tents and would say that is as close as you can get to affordable all around. Used it up north in -20 with a kerosene heater and was comfortable enough to sleep on top of your sleeping bag on low. I have a heavier canvas tent but rarely use it might spend the money and buy an Arctic oven as they are probably the best you will find.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the outcome of the vote.--Benjamin Franklin

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    Member Longkj's Avatar
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    Default Lets talk TENTS

    I have an REI tent called BASE CAMP. It's a 4 person tent with two vesti's and very affordable. The tent is pretty lite and I have used it year round. If you waist your money on expensive tents you will be pissed with yourself because you will be more surprised how much you don't use it. I ordered 4 different tents before I decided on the one I have, and what made me decision was the aluminum poles that I got with the tent. They were strong, lite weight, and the material was the same. Great tent!

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    I don't think there is a one tent does it all. You need a light weight tent for up in the mountains. Something like the Seirra Designs clip flashlight or the big agnus ul 3 for a spacious two man mountain tent. Then there is moose camp, taking the family out, and winter camping. For the winter part I really like a stove of some type. It is also nice to be able to get dressed without half your body hanging out of the tent, sit in a chair, or sleep on a cot. For this type of stuff I use my Arctic oven AO-10. I wish I had the 12, but they didn't make it when I go mine. I also have a moss 4 seasons tent, but it doesn't get used much anymore since I got my AO-10.

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    Member Grayling Slayer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Lets talk TENTS

    I avoid winter camping for the most part, but my Cabelas guide tent gets the most use year round. I think it is a good compromise on cost, quality and weight. It is packable for all but backpacking and will keep you dry in any weather. I use a little propane heater in the morning to cut the chill in late September. One day I might get an Arctic Oven but that is a lot of money for a tent.
    "I'd rather be fishing!"

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    Member IndyCzar's Avatar
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    The closest thing I have found to 4 seasons is the Hilberg Nallo GT3...its a lot of room for 2 and could swing 3 in there, lightweight packable and lots of tie downs for heavy winds...(sorry no pics of that one in action)

    For more base camp type work the arctic oven 12 is awesome, just pretty heavy ...Took the boys camping last weekend...-17 degrees out but inside warm and toasty with stove and small amount of wood...Slept in t shirt and on top of bag most of the night temp was probably near 80 at top and mid 60 on the ground..
    .GOPR0134.jpg

  8. #8

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    I appear to be doing the same type of research and am leaning toward a 3 season that allows a bare bones set-up. Above alpine I'll use the tent fly and ground cloth (losing about 2 lbs of canopy/no-seeum) and down low (where pack weight is not an issue) I'll use the complete set-up.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    I couldn't find an affordable tent to do all year round trips, so I built my own. I use an assault outfitter 4 (modeled after a tent used by the marines). I had stove jacks sewed into the main tent body and the rain fly. I've done everything from winter camping, high winds for day (80-100 mph), but it's mostly a river tent. I like this tent for the following reasons:

    1. Three poles that withstand high winds
    2. Two large vestibules
    3. All mesh inside main tent body can be zipped up...think winter DRAFT
    4. Fast set up with constant movements up/down rivers because all poles are the same size
    5. Minus the packable woodstove, two guys could split the weight of the tent and have only 7 lbs per piece.
    6. Bathtub floor, and longevity.....the darn things has done three years of trips.
    7. I can frequently dry clothes with the stove, and get a nice warm-up first thing in the morning, and at night (about an hour burn)

    With that said, you can't skimp on tents, so raise your budget a bit, sell off crap you don't need to make up the difference.

    For years, I've been trying to find a decent cookshack with a removable floor, with at least three poles. Danatherock put me on the MSR back country barn. This is the space to do the living (think rain, bugs, high winds). This thing is just tall enough to stand in, but with three poles and lot's of guy-out points, it can handle serious winds. I also got a stove jack sewed in this tent, for drying lot's of stuff, or showering with the Zodi shower on a cold day.

    Both tents, sleeping bags, and camp pads for two.....fit in one dry bag. You mentioned AFFORDABLE.....so this is as best a combo as I've found, and will continue to use these till they don't offer them anymore.


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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Couple pics of the living room:


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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    One more of the living room:



    With that said, I won't winter camp again, unless it's in an Arctic Oven that's tall enough to stand in. The msr backcountry barn can be an ice-fishing house because of the removable floor.

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    For backpacking mountain use, go with a floorless tipi shelter like the GoLight SL3. Others make similar tipi floorless style tents as well. Bearpaw Designs and Seek Outside are two. Floorless tents work in most conditions. The only place I would hesitate to use one would be the desert where small critters that can kill you will get in. Or Ants. I hate ants in my sleeping bag.

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    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    If you really want to include arctic camping you need two tents, an AO and some thing light and packable like the GoLight SL3. I wont' get too crazy with the cold any more (think nothing colder than 0*), so my Kifaru Sawtooth is a great compromise tent. It's light enough to pack, you can get a liner for wet environments, you can add a titanium stove for cold, sheds wind very well if set up properly, and you can stand in it.
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

  14. #14

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    i to agree that there is no such thing as year round all purpose tent.i have my 6 man guide model, used in wheeler/boat/ sometimes plane basedhunts. in its price range it is hard to beat..6'3 ceiling, fits a queen size air mattresswith ease, is awesome with wet/windy weather and so on. also have my '2 man'( im 6'2 225 so really tight with 2)eureka backcountry that works for hike in/ pack-in situations. the guide model will work in winterwith a heater...but im over the winter campin scene. nothing compares to AO's for winter

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    What about a tipi? I want an arctic oven but don't want to spend that much. Wall tent would be nice but its kinda heavy and bulky. I've been looking at a Tipi. one pole and the fabric. Add a stove for the winter

    http://www.titaniumgoat.com/products.html

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Ray View Post
    For backpacking mountain use, go with a floorless tipi shelter like the GoLight SL3... Floorless tents work in most conditions... .

    Don't mean to hijack OP but what are the "other conditions" where floorless don't work? Wet when you set up shop?

    I too have been searching for a lightweight tent to pack up the mtns. and the shelter's have the minuscule weight that I like but here in SEAK even on nice sunny days the alpine is still soppin wet. Bugs are still an issue in August alpine so the lack of netting in some shelters is a turn-off.

    Dakota Boy - I stumbled across this tent by Brooks Range Mountaineering called the Foray and have been giving it a serious look.
    http://blackwidowtackleandhunting.wo...ge-foray-tent/

    Until the time that I save up enough coin for a fancy tent I'm going to attempt to modify an Alps Mountaineering Mystique 1.5 into a 2 person tent that is significantly less weight (4 pounds too much for a 1 person!). I bought it on sale for 30$ so hard to pass up.

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    Dakota to answer you question ... No it is not possible unless you are willing to sacrifice something. A sheep tent simply is not comfy in most winter conditions. Since you are on a budget I suggest watching Craig's list as I have been amazed of late with all the deals on there. These floor less tents seem to be the rage but me personally I just don't like them. I use my sheep tent to spike out moose hunting bear hunting and you name it. From what I have seen those floor less do nothing to keep out bugs or critters like parka squirrels... My two choices are my little two man marmot and a bomb shelter... Just my opinion of course

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Dakota to answer you question ... No it is not possible unless you are willing to sacrifice something. A sheep tent simply is not comfy in most winter conditions. Since you are on a budget I suggest watching Craig's list as I have been amazed of late with all the deals on there. These floor less tents seem to be the rage but me personally I just don't like them. I use my sheep tent to spike out moose hunting bear hunting and you name it. From what I have seen those floor less do nothing to keep out bugs or critters like parka squirrels... My two choices are my little two man marmot and a bomb shelter... Just my opinion of course
    Yeah I agree......I bought the Golite SL3 and for the minimal weight, I don't mind having the nest. No bugs...no critters.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  19. #19
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    The Arctic Oven is a nice 4 season tent.
    you won't pack this tent around I will say. Heavy, but very well built tent.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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