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Thread: 2013 Garden planning

  1. #1

    Default 2013 Garden planning

    So who's already started there plans for this years garden? I started going through seed catalogs today, and listing what's gonna go where. Think I will have all my seeds ordered I'm the next few days. I waited to long last year an missed out on a few of my favorites. Saw the sun till almost five today and its giving me the itch. Come on sweet summer time, ok ill just take spring!

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    Member alaska_pike's Avatar
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    ya weve got some plans, last spring i put in a 12' by 12' foot garden and i put up a 4 foot fence because we have a lot of rabbits out here, but it did not keep the moose from getting in. this spring i plan to use that garden for my potatoes and build another one with a taller fence for everything else. definitely looking forward to some fresh garden greens

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    Default Seed companies

    Don't forget to use your local seed companies, when it fits your bill, they have excellent AK proven products.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mark oathout View Post
    Don't forget to use your local seed companies, when it fits your bill, they have excellent AK proven products.

    Local seed company...?, not to be rude but there is not anyone producing veggie seed in AK. Forgive me if you are just recommending purchasing seed packets from a local retail store.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mad_yaker View Post
    Local seed company...?, not to be rude but there is not anyone producing veggie seed in AK.
    http://www.denaliseed.com/

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mad_yaker View Post
    Local seed company...?, not to be rude but there is not anyone producing veggie seed in AK.
    http://www.denaliseed.com/
    As much as I wish it were true, Brian, I believe little, if any (I am unaware of any and would like to be proved wrong), of Denaliseed's vegetable seed is sourced from Alaska. "Tested" here, and marketed here, but not produced here.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Denali does not produce seed, they purchase bulk from other seed dealers (not in ak) repackage and then sell to the public. I believe that their seed is even packaged out of state and sent to the "store" in anchorage and sold from there. So there would be no difference purchasing seed from Johnny seeds and Denali seed company. Heck Denali even has the seed packets printed out of state. Not saying the varieties they have are not great. I just don't like the wool pulled over my eyes. To top it off the owner last I heard does not reside in Alaska anymore. Not what I would call a local seed company. So everyone knows I'm not trying to speak negatively about a retail outlet I just like all the info to be on the table.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mad_yaker View Post
    Denali does not produce seed, they purchase bulk from other seed dealers (not in ak) repackage and then sell to the public. I believe that their seed is even packaged out of state and sent to the "store" in anchorage and sold from there. So there would be no difference purchasing seed from Johnny seeds and Denali seed company. Heck Denali even has the seed packets printed out of state. Not saying the varieties they have are not great. I just don't like the wool pulled over my eyes. To top it off the owner last I heard does not reside in Alaska anymore. Not what I would call a local seed company. So everyone knows I'm not trying to speak negatively about a retail outlet I just like all the info to be on the table.
    This is my understanding as well. And I have found that most, if not all of the time I can do better by selecting seed from other companies that is specifically sourced from growers at high altitude/latitude/climate that most closely approximates my site conditions. Denali seed sources are essentially anonymous to the purchaser.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info, fellas. I've not yet bought seeds from Denali, but was planning on it this year. I'm only three years into the whole gardening gig, but thus far I've bought Ed Hume seeds almost exclusively (except for bok choy) and have had great success. I do want to experiment with some other varieties, though - especially broccoli, as I haven't been getting large, cohesive heads but rather lots of tiny heads on each plant. Anyhow, any suggestions for companies that specialize in northern climates or high altitudes would be much appreciated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Thanks for the info, fellas. I've not yet bought seeds from Denali, but was planning on it this year. I'm only three years into the whole gardening gig, but thus far I've bought Ed Hume seeds almost exclusively (except for bok choy) and have had great success. I do want to experiment with some other varieties, though - especially broccoli, as I haven't been getting large, cohesive heads but rather lots of tiny heads on each plant. Anyhow, any suggestions for companies that specialize in northern climates or high altitudes would be much appreciated.
    Do you prefer to grow heirloom/open pollinated varieties, over f1/ hybrids?

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mad_yaker View Post
    Do you prefer to grow heirloom/open pollinated varieties, over f1/ hybrids?
    You're speaking a different language, my friend. I put seeds in dirt, they grow, I transplant them to my garden, they grow some more, I harvest and eat them. Sorry, but I have yet to dig into the difference between heirloom seeds and the more standard varieties.

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    Default seed

    Their seed may be marketed as suggested, however, lots of trial has been done in AK for varieties, they are not just buying seed and marketing it as usuable in AK. Of note; they also have instructions that pertain to a hard to grow plants in AK.
    Whoever suggests they sell blind does not have their info correct, and I would suggest calling them personally. Someday AK may not be a colonial economy, but for now, I always suggest supporting AK business when you can, or can afford to.

    Hybrids are generally more disease tolerate than many Heirlooms, but many are migrating to Heirlooms because of genetically altered seeds.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    I've been using a lot of Denali seeds for a couple years now. Well actually only since about 1973 I think. I can't say that any of them were no good. However they don't always have everything I want, so I also put in an order with Burpee. Also, Ed Hume sells some things that have worked quite well for us. I don't have suitable indoor space (nor the inclination to do anything about it yet) to grow a lot of starts so I usually rely upon P&M and other local nurseries for all of our brassicas. I am still learning how to start tomatoes, cucumbers, and head lettuce indoors.

  14. #14

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    There is seeds that are harvested and sold here in the valley. There is a couple operating a seed co It is called Foundroots. Check their web site at www.foundroot.com or contact them at foundroot@gmail.com 907-414-3077 There is going to be a seed exchange on Feb. 2 from 3pm to 5pm it will be held at the Midnight Sun Yoga Center located 832 S Colony Way suite 2 Palmer.
    Exchange left over seeds for new ones,connect with community members,and warm up the winter with some 2013 garden planning.

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    Default Seed companies

    Other than price; anyone who has grown a garden in AK for many years, already has found that many varieties are a waste of time, and it was money wasted. For example; there is a big difference in performance between a (Provider) or (Contender), that you find at a company like Denali Seeds, versus a a (Kentucky pole bean) from Burpee, while both have close to the same maturity date. As for the Tomatoes varieties Denali Seed offers, they do grow outside in areas with a so called "good AK summer" and a couple are pretty ok for those phenotypes. You will be lucky to find any other tomato from other seed companies that can do this. Why? Grown in AK and tested beforehand, of course. Of note, some they used to carry are gone, such as the bland Siberian, which to me says something in its own right.

    My original comment was a suggestion, to buy from, and in turn "support the local economy" if it fits your requirements. Why would I care? Alaska imports over 95 percent of its produce, and seed up here is even more scarce. To support, and grow an infastructure based off of these needs only makes good sense to me, and I should not have to explain why...
    I also buy alot of seed from other companies when I see fit.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old John View Post
    I've been using a lot of Denali seeds for a couple years now. Well actually only since about 1973 I think.
    Okay, I've only been using Denali seeds since 1977 when they first went into business.. My wife tells me my CRS is more noticeable these days.

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    Default Strains

    An open pollinated variety just means it was pollinated naturally, wind bees, etc., and does not signify an Heirloom. An Heirloom is a strain that has existed for many generations, and may be open pollinated. A crossing of these strains produces a "created Heirloom" Hybrids have been tailored for disease resistance, tough skin for shipping, yield, uniformity, any trait you can think of, but many times at the expense of the taste. However, there are a few exceptional varieties.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Bend View Post
    There is seeds that are harvested and sold here in the valley. There is a couple operating a seed co It is called Foundroots. Check their web site at www.foundroot.com or contact them at foundroot@gmail.com 907-414-3077 There is going to be a seed exchange on Feb. 2 from 3pm to 5pm it will be held at the Midnight Sun Yoga Center located 832 S Colony Way suite 2 Palmer.
    Exchange left over seeds for new ones,connect with community members,and warm up the winter with some 2013 garden planning.
    Great to see this kind of activity in AK! Thanks for posting it. Rep sent.

    For Brian, and others interested, I highly recommend the book Seed to Seed available here: http://www.seedsavers.org/onlinestore/SSE-Books/
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

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    Default seed

    Nice info thanks for posting that, I think I will order a copy. Pretty important anymore I think

  20. #20

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    As stated in my other post I was in no means of putting a business down and by no means trying to ruffle feathers of others opinions. But I will stick to my guns that purchasing seed from Denali is in no way different than finding the same seed from another seed source and purchasing it. I do agree in supporting local business across the board. Even if the parent company does not reside here, the folks working at the store have a job due to those companies having a store front within our state.
    As for seed companies in Ak, Denali has not trialed seed in Alaska or produced any seed in AK. They made a smart business decision years ago (1977) to follow the research being done by the university (UAF), found seed brokers elsewhere for those varieties shipped them to AK re-packaged them and marketed to the gardeners of AK. As for seed produced in AK, it is very limited, and I mean limited. We do not have the growing season(s) to make it possible to produce veggie seed. Yes you can save seed from a tom or cuc’s if grown in a high tunnel or greenhouse, but will not be able to produce many others. Most veggies need a much longer growing season(s) than we have to produce viable seeds.
    As for comparing ‘Provider’ and ‘Contender’ to a “Kentucky pole bean”, would be like comparing apples and onions. Both of the above mentioned beans are bush beans and not pole beans. Second to that there are other varieties that are not offered for sale by Denali or have not been trialed that are just as productive and taste just as good as either of those. Which one would never know about if it was not to purchasing seed from elsewhere and trialing it yourself. Which is one of the most enjoyable parts of gardening? Right..
    Stating that AK only produces 95 percent of its produce is a moot point. Yes we may be able to decrease that number slightly with the increase of people gardening at home and an increase in small farming operations. But that fact is we have very limited agricultural land, a very short growing season and an appetite year round for produce that can not be grown or stored long enough to make it through our long winters.
    Last but not least, Foundroot; an example of another company purchasing seed that can not be grown in the state repackaging it and selling it to Alaskans. It is great option for purchasing seeds locally and supporting locals and their business, but no different than purchasing seed from Lowes or Wal-Mart (if you can find the same varieties) since Alaskans work there too.. For them growing and selling seed in AK, I hope not, since if they are they are not following the State of AK seed regulations and requirements for selling seed in AK. Hopefully if they are growing seed for sale they are just unfamiliar with the requirements.

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