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Thread: Learning about calling moose from my dog

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    Default Learning about calling moose from my dog

    This Winter I've been listening to my dog bark. He's a lab so typically when he barks it's usually for a reason. He has his I want to come in bark.. time to play bark. And sometimes, he's just letting everyone(other dogs) in the area know he's around.

    After a good night of barking, I've noticed a dog come tooling through the yard.. maybe not till the next afternoon. And you just know there was some communication involved.


    Sometimes it takes more than a day.


    It just really helps reinforce for me how moose calling works. They hear it, and they'll come when they feel it's a good time.

    It's helped me see the value of calling from several different areas, and making a plan to have a view of the areas I've called and critters that wander over to see what's up. More than anything learning it's a patience game.

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    Member elksnout's Avatar
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    That's what I'm trying to get a mindset for this Sept. Bro in law and I are doing a float (archery) for moose, and we are 25yr elk chasers, so getting it my little skadootlie brain to sit still and wait is going to be work!

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    Quote Originally Posted by elksnout View Post
    That's what I'm trying to get a mindset for this Sept. Bro in law and I are doing a float (archery) for moose, and we are 25yr elk chasers, so getting it my little skadootlie brain to sit still and wait is going to be work!

    Yea, when I was 25 I couldn't sit in one place ten minutes let alone three days.


    Too much moving and spreading your scent around doesn't fill the freezer... well until it does. Oh look there's a moose.

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    Quote Originally Posted by anchorrivercrowds View Post
    It just really helps reinforce for me how moose calling works. They hear it, and they'll come when they feel it's a good time.
    To me it's more of the "situation" rather than when they feel it's a "good" time. Because when it's the "right" time, meaning things are really heating up, then usually the time is right now. Case in point.....you may get a reply from a bull from a distance away and that will be it because he's got cows. He won't budge because he knows you're far enough away not to be a threat. BUT......if you move towards that bull and get close enough, maybe only a few minutes from when you first called, look out because he very well may be coming quick to kick your ass. Bulls with cows will react a lot differently than a bull, even a big bull, by himself.

    Then again......a younger bull by himself may hear your call and come in. But, being younger he may come in REAL quiet because he's still a bit leery about all this. You may not even hear him grunt till he's right on top of you.

    I've had big bulls come in hard early in the rut, only to hang up and never come all the way in. Early in the rut they are just seeing who's around and to check out the competition. They may only be interested in a little light sparring and you will have to show interest as well.

    What I'm getting at here is when the time is right, it's pretty much right for all of them. But it's a matter of what the situation is that determines how, or if, they come in to your call. Even though many, MANY have, I will never assume that a bull will come all the way in, even when the time is right......imo.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    To me it's more of the "situation" rather than when they feel it's a "good" time. Because when it's the "right" time, meaning things are really heating up, then usually the time is right now. Case in point.....you may get a reply from a bull from a distance away and that will be it because he's got cows. He won't budge because he knows you're far enough away not to be a threat. BUT......if you move towards that bull and get close enough, maybe only a few minutes from when you first called, look out because he very well may be coming quick to kick your ass. Bulls with cows will react a lot differently than a bull, even a big bull, by himself.

    Then again......a younger bull by himself may hear your call and come in. But, being younger he may come in REAL quiet because he's still a bit leery about all this. You may not even hear him grunt till he's right on top of you.

    I've had big bulls come in hard early in the rut, only to hang up and never come all the way in. Early in the rut they are just seeing who's around and to check out the competition. They may only be interested in a little light sparring and you will have to show interest as well.

    What I'm getting at here is when the time is right, it's pretty much right for all of them. But it's a matter of what the situation is that determines how, or if, they come in to your call. Even though many, MANY have, I will never assume that a bull will come all the way in, even when the time is right......imo.
    So... You're saying that calling either works, or it doesn't? haha I agree with you though.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    To me it's more of the "situation" rather than when they feel it's a "good" time. Because when it's the "right" time, meaning things are really heating up, then usually the time is right now. Case in point.....you may get a reply from a bull from a distance away and that will be it because he's got cows. He won't budge because he knows you're far enough away not to be a threat. BUT......if you move towards that bull and get close enough, maybe only a few minutes from when you first called, look out because he very well may be coming quick to kick your ass. Bulls with cows will react a lot differently than a bull, even a big bull, by himself.

    Then again......a younger bull by himself may hear your call and come in. But, being younger he may come in REAL quiet because he's still a bit leery about all this. You may not even hear him grunt till he's right on top of you.

    I've had big bulls come in hard early in the rut, only to hang up and never come all the way in. Early in the rut they are just seeing who's around and to check out the competition. They may only be interested in a little light sparring and you will have to show interest as well.

    What I'm getting at here is when the time is right, it's pretty much right for all of them. But it's a matter of what the situation is that determines how, or if, they come in to your call. Even though many, MANY have, I will never assume that a bull will come all the way in, even when the time is right......imo.
    yea I get what you are saying. This years bull came in waddling. And he never wavered. He had made a decision(Sept 17). Two years ago two came in and it was the next morning(Sept 10). They were more curious than anything else, came to see what was going on.

    What I was also thinking about when starting the thread was the different sounds the dog makes when he barks(there is a pretty distinct bark he uses when yaking at the dogs across the way). Do you like the thunder bull call, or what ever that thing is called?

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    Quote Originally Posted by anchorrivercrowds View Post
    Yea, when I was 25 I couldn't sit in one place ten minutes let alone three days.


    Too much moving and spreading your scent around doesn't fill the freezer... well until it does. Oh look there's a moose.


    Yeah but I'm 57 and STILL can't sit still for more than 10 minutes...unless I fall asleep...and that sucks when it's at the wrong time!

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    [QUOTE=Do you like the thunder bull call, or what ever that thing is called?[/QUOTE]

    With one are you asking about the, “there danger around” use by cows and bulls to warn other moose of danger, or is it “I’m the biggest bad-est ass bull around” used to intimidate other bulls.

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    Quote Originally Posted by anchorrivercrowds View Post
    Do you like the thunder bull call, or what ever that thing is called?
    If it's the one I think you are talking about, then it my be good to get the attention of bulls that are quite aways off, say over a lot of wide open area where your voice might not carry well. But other than that I've always just used my hands cupped around my mouth to call. That, combined with raking with a moose scapula, is about my favorite. Then when a bull gets close, I usually drop the grunt call and just rake.

    I do also want to stress though that I'm not saying not to be patient. Sometimes, especially if it's calm and your voice will carry a long way, a bull may hear you from far off and head your direction. But he may just take his sweet time closing the gap, and it can really take some time getting to you.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Default Learning about calling moose from my dog

    I knew they had good hearing, but learned my lesson this fall. Saw one wide open (no cover) over 2 miles away, upwind with sustained 30. Figured I'd belt one out to see what happened. he didn't turn immediately towards us, but by dark he was within 400 yds. next day was a weather day so we stayed in the tent, found him one creek over the following day (we passed on him... 50 for sure next year). Our last day in this spot, we awoke to bulls fighting and running through camp (less than 50 yds), including the one we pulled in. Apparently there were a lot of moose around, and my snoring is attractive to them

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    Quote Originally Posted by akshootnscoot View Post
    Apparently there were a lot of moose around, and my snoring is attractive to them
    I remember talking to Don pool (B&C scorer) one time and he told me that they were hunting up on the Tusty trophy bench. One night he had to wake up his buddy telling him that if he didn't quit snoring a bull was gonna stomp them in the tent. Apparently his snoring was really pissing the old bull off.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    To me it's more of the "situation" rather than when they feel it's a "good" time. Because when it's the "right" time, meaning things are really heating up, then usually the time is right now. Case in point.....you may get a reply from a bull from a distance away and that will be it because he's got cows. He won't budge because he knows you're far enough away not to be a threat. BUT......if you move towards that bull and get close enough, maybe only a few minutes from when you first called, look out because he very well may be coming quick to kick your ass. Bulls with cows will react a lot differently than a bull, even a big bull, by himself.

    Then again......a younger bull by himself may hear your call and come in. But, being younger he may come in REAL quiet because he's still a bit leery about all this. You may not even hear him grunt till he's right on top of you.

    I've had big bulls come in hard early in the rut, only to hang up and never come all the way in. Early in the rut they are just seeing who's around and to check out the competition. They may only be interested in a little light sparring and you will have to show interest as well.

    What I'm getting at here is when the time is right, it's pretty much right for all of them. But it's a matter of what the situation is that determines how, or if, they come in to your call. Even though many, MANY have, I will never assume that a bull will come all the way in, even when the time is right......imo.
    I pretty much agree with everything 4merguide says here. With one exception. My Son and I were in what was then what we considered our traditional Moose camp, on the Yentna River. We had a pretty good spot about 1/4 mile inland that had regularly produced "winter meat". My Son had become quite proficient at calling, and was getting an occasional answer, but nothing was coming in close enough to show. One nite just setting down to supper, my Son glanced across the river and standing on the sandbar was this monster. My Son dropped his plate of food, grabbed his rifle, but before he could draw a bead the big bull, whirled around and beat it back into the thick willows. We jumped in the boat and zipped over to look around. The different tracks the old boy had made down to the waters edge indicated he had heard our calling and had contemplated crossing the river and whipping someone's butt several times, over the last 2 days. We saw that he had assembled a good sized harem there in the willows, which probably caused him to hesitate leaving every time he thought about crossing the river. My Son was upset, because for 20+ years we had talked about some monster moose stumbling out onto that very sandbar while we were setting in camp, and now that it had happened, we'd muffed it. For the next couple days, I was getting real tired of hearing my grown son moan and groan about missing our chance. And then... While setting under my favorite spruce tree waiting for something to come in to his calling. I began to feel like somebody or something was watching me. Sure enough, standing about 35 yards away, in some very thick alders, stood a little spike, watching me. He had obviously come sneaking in to get a look at who/what was calling. He got 180 grain of heartburn for his efforts.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    With one are you asking about the, “there danger around” use by cows and bulls to warn other moose of danger, or is it “I’m the biggest bad-est ass bull around” used to intimidate other bulls.

    I was thinking of the commercially produced Bull magnet. Seems some voice magnification would be handy especially around rivers.

    I've been pretty careful not to traipse allover the country spreading scent, but I think with some of the feed back I've gotten the last few years, I am going to start calling further from the river.. looking back towards the river. Only problem is maybe it works, and you get a bull down a mile from the river..

    Moose calling is kinda funny. We only do it 2-3 weeks a year.. are typically alone when we do it.. and most of us don't ask many questions, or let anyone hear our calls.. just because.

    I tend to like cow calls up until the 15th or so, but vary it.

    One thing I saw this year I liked was a set of moose horns cut out of 1/4 inch plywood(not overly large).. big and white.. used to scrap.. and also to hold high and flash to temp a bull over for a good fight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old John View Post
    I pretty much agree with everything 4merguide says here. With one exception.
    What's the exception here as I'm not seeing it...???
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    10 years ago in my effort to become a better moose hunter I made a fordable set of moose antlers after carrying them around for a couple of years I decided it was not one of my better ideas. For one thing they do not sound like a antler hitting a tree and there are other thing that make a better visual object to attract a bull.

    I don't believe the reason a hunter stop seeing moose around a trail is because of the scent they leave behind. If you make a lot of human noise walking down a trail you will never see a moose on the trail. A moose hearing is several thousand time better than a human, you mention your dog barking at another dog if you had better hearing you would hear the other dog also barking and a moose has better hearing than a dog.

    You mention your dog makes three difference barks, moose have five difference sounds they use to say “HELLO” so to speak. If you know how to make the sounds and more importance how to use them, you will be able to bring in that moose that just does not want to come in. How do I know this a moose told me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    What's the exception here as I'm not seeing it...???
    I don't either now... Poor choice of words on my part.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    You mention your dog makes three difference barks, moose have five difference sounds they use to say “HELLO” so to speak.
    I remember years ago......

    I hadn't been moose hunting very long and really didn't know much, if anything, about calling. In fact a friend and I had been walking all over that day, with me using the ol' "coffee can and a string" caller I made. I had been pulling on that string for hours with nothing to show for it. It was getting late and we were headed back towards the truck. We got to the lake with a good view where we had pretty much started, and, looking at my friend, I grinned and tossed down that da*n can, cupped my hands around my mouth and blurted out my best interpretation of a bull grunt. IMMEDIATELY a bull grunted back. My buddy looked at me and said...."what was that....an echo?" I said, "Hell no, that's a bull...!!!" I grunted again and this bull started coming hard. Only problem was that he was coming in from the other side of this near impenetrable wall of brush and alders. The bull kept coming and coming but we couldn't see a thing. He came to, what I found out later, was about 50 yards away, and he stopped grunting, but started making this nasally type clicking noise. I stopped grunting in fear of spooking him. He made this clicking noise for quite awhile and then just stopped and quietly wandered off. Never saw him.

    After all the years thinking about this I now believe that because it was early in the rut, this clicking noise the bull made was his way of saying "ok, I'm here and now it's your turn....let me see you and we can spar a little". And seeing that I didn't approach him (or do anything) he lost interest and just left. Had I to do it over again I would have slowly tried to make my way through the brush, clanking a scapula as I went to try and cover any man made noise I might make. If done correctly I feel this would hold his attention and I may be able to get in close enough for a shot.

    That same friend of mine swore that dragging a shoulder blade behind him on a string as he walked worked wonders. He killed a nice bull doing it once so I guess it will work. He said he got the tip from some old moose hunters.

    Moose do have many strange sounds. One evening I listened to a group of cows and calves just going at it between themselves with all kinds of strange and different sounds.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old John View Post
    I don't either now... Poor choice of words on my part.
    ......it's all good...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    10 years ago in my effort to become a better moose hunter I made a fordable set of moose antlers after carrying them around for a couple of years I decided it was not one of my better ideas. For one thing they do not sound like a antler hitting a tree and there are other thing that make a better visual object to attract a bull.

    I don't believe the reason a hunter stop seeing moose around a trail is because of the scent they leave behind. If you make a lot of human noise walking down a trail you will never see a moose on the trail. A moose hearing is several thousand time better than a human, you mention your dog barking at another dog if you had better hearing you would hear the other dog also barking and a moose has better hearing than a dog.

    You mention your dog makes three difference barks, moose have five difference sounds they use to say “HELLO” so to speak. If you know how to make the sounds and more importance how to use them, you will be able to bring in that moose that just does not want to come in. How do I know this a moose told me.

    That's kind of what I was digging for,, the different calls.

    I carried a gallon oil jug this year for scrapping. I know for sure I won't use that again. It broadcast great, but I don't think the sound was very effective.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    I remember talking to Don pool (B&C scorer) one time and he told me that they were hunting up on the Tusty trophy bench. One night he had to wake up his buddy telling him that if he didn't quit snoring a bull was gonna stomp them in the tent. Apparently his snoring was really pissing the old bull off.
    I've witnessed a bull being called into camp by snoring and he then spent hours glucking while stomping around the tent - he left before first light.

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