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Thread: Flying "DRUNK" can be costly.

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    And not just for the Pilot...
    Ignorance is not Bliss, it's insanity

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    While it is sad for anyone to get killed it also upsets me that many folks risk their lives looking for this guy. Thousands of dollars were spent searching for his plane and many members donated to the gas fund to look for him. I believe folks would have felt differently about doing so if they knew he was drunk when dropped off at the airport. IMHO when people make careless decisions, that's their business, until it endangers others. By taking off impaired he could have flown into other air traffic or crashed into a families home.

    I pray for his loved ones left behind.
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    While it is sad for anyone to get killed it also upsets me that many folks risk their lives looking for this guy. Thousands of dollars were spent searching for his plane and many members donated to the gas fund to look for him. I believe folks would have felt differently about doing so if they knew he was drunk when dropped off at the airport. IMHO when people make careless decisions, that's their business, until it endangers others. By taking off impaired he could have flown into other air traffic or crashed into a families home.

    I pray for his loved ones left behind.

    I agree 100% with every word.......

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default Flying "DRUNK" can be costly.

    Had they found him and he recovered to go on and be a great father husband would it not have been worth the effort of searching?? Lots of folks do stupid stuff (especially when young) and make some simply terrible decisions in their life. Most of us survive to learn from it and eventually grow up. That didn't happen this time and to me this is simply a very sad case. I watched a video a few days ago of his daughter sending up a candle balloon with a note to her father in heaven.... Had there been an opportunity to give her dad back to her regardless of how he ended up in the situation I doubt many here could stomach telling her you wouldn't do it.

    I am in no place to pass judgement, that is up to a higher power than me and isn't a job I would ever want.

    It is interesting to learn that there was radar data which was not brought to light till recently.

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    The radar data was reported shortly, a week maybe, after he disappeared. It was known, even while they were still searching that he had gone off the radar over the inlet.

    I thought his father put it well by saying basically that he was lucky enough to have had his son for 27 years, and that he recognized and accepted that it was a series of bad decisions that caused his death.

    I pray mostly for his wife and daughter. Havin kids of your own causes a guy to reflect on these sorts of things. The decisions we make while hunting, etc, have the potential to bring immeasurable loss to our loved ones at home...

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Had they found him and he recovered to go on and be a great father husband would it not have been worth the effort of searching?? Lots of folks do stupid stuff (especially when young) and make some simply terrible decisions in their life. Most of us survive to learn from it and eventually grow up. That didn't happen this time and to me this is simply a very sad case. I watched a video a few days ago of his daughter sending up a candle balloon with a note to her father in heaven.... Had there been an opportunity to give her dad back to her regardless of how he ended up in the situation I doubt many here could stomach telling her you wouldn't do it.

    I am in no place to pass judgement, that is up to a higher power than me and isn't a job I would ever want.

    It is interesting to learn that there was radar data which was not brought to light till recently.
    I'm not saying that he should not have been searched for. What I'm saying is that the information that the taxi driver provided, that he was impaired when he was dropped off and that he told the driver he was going to sleep in the plane should have been released. It was released that a taxi driver was interviewed and that he was given a ride to the airport.

    I'm saying that I would not be as willing to risk MY LIFE and money to search for a drunk pilot. I have kids and a wife at home as well.

    I'm not judging the young man and my heart breaks for his daughter. But, how would you feel if another pilot was killed out looking for him??

    How would you feel if he had flown into a 737 with your family on it heading into Anchorage.

    IMHO, you get a lot of "do overs" in life. Flying drunk and endangering others is not one of them.
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    Where there's the slightest chance of survival, there's hope. If we search for 1000 guys and one makes it home, the effort was worthwhile.

    Have some respect for those who still hurt from this event. They read the internet, too.

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    Default Flying "DRUNK" can be costly.

    I don't know that many in the cap would have searched differently or less knowing what they know. But I was pretty amazed how many planes were out obviously searching the week after his happened, and I'm near 75 miles away from where it was pretty likely he'd gone down.

    I don't think anyone is being disrespectful of this young guy or his family, just of the unfortunate decision that he made. Being a good judge of risks takes experience, we all know that.

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Where there's the slightest chance of survival, there's hope. If we search for 1000 guys and one makes it home, the effort was worthwhile.

    Have some respect for those who still hurt from this event. They read the internet, too.
    No one is being disrespectful and everyone is hoping the best for the family. Isn't it true we learn from othersmistakes? I think that is what is being projected along with don't let your bad descisions in life risk others. Only us who can read this very forum can learn from this,The pilot unfortunatly can't. We all know what he did was wrong on many levels so lets learn from this. Once again no disrespect towards the pilot. one of the big questions brought up was the information that was released and it's timing. Would of been nice to know that an aircraft had been flying erratic and was lost over the inlet sooner. It could of helped narrow the search area and maybe found debrie in the water before the tides got it. I was hearing rumors right after it happened and the rumors are what is being reported in the news today...
    Ignorance is not Bliss, it's insanity

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Folks tend to be more defensive of the dead. Just like when Neil killed himself flying drunk:
    http://www.adn.com/2010/05/14/127850...s-respond.html

    http://www.ntsb.gov/aviationquery/br...10FA038&akey=1


    Basically this last guy was a low time student pilot. He had also lied about his prior DWI history on his FAA paperwork. He then managed to get drunk enough and annoying enough that he was thrown out of a bar in Soldotna ( Hooligans no less ). Followed by his making a illegal night flight while drunk.
    At least nobody died looking for him and he did not cash into anyone's house.
    Yes, I would have preferred that he lived through the whole thing. As long as he sat in jail for a couple weeks as an example.

    If you want to be a pilot you need to put on your big-boy (or big-girl) trousers and quit with the childish antics.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
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    I would think that "Dead Drunk" is an apt description. While my sympathies go out to the family, I can offer none to the pilot.

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    Alcohol abuse just doesn't mix well with the Alaskan lifestyle. Sno-go, 4wheeler, airplanes, guns, boats, cold water, thin ice... You need your wits about you to survive.... If you want to abuse alcohol and still live the Alaskan lifestyle, the odds are against you. I spent six years flying fixed wing medevacs in Alaska. I was amazed and saddened at the number of alcohol related deaths and injuries.... What a waste....

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    It is suprising how many people do drink and do the Alaskan adventure. I won't even fly as a passanger if I have been drinking in case a stuation arises where I need to be able to think. I think this is a good reminder to all of us why we leave the bottle alone if we plan to play
    Ignorance is not Bliss, it's insanity

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabliss View Post
    It is suprising how many people do drink and do the Alaskan adventure. I won't even fly as a passanger if I have been drinking in case a stuation arises where I need to be able to think. I think this is a good reminder to all of us why we leave the bottle alone if we plan to play

    I can vouch for Alaskabliss on his rules of no drinking while playing. Not only will he not drink when operating his Thunder Jet he wont even haul rum to me to drop off! He is a stickler for rules!

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexander View Post
    I can vouch for Alaskabliss on his rules of no drinking while playing. Not only will he not drink when operating his Thunder Jet he wont even haul rum to me to drop off! He is a stickler for rules!
    I was on my way to deliver but my wife being the smart one pulled the key and reminded me of the foolishness drinking and boating and the West channel is. Sometimes she is such a Gem. By the time I got to you the next day the rum was gone...
    Ignorance is not Bliss, it's insanity

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