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Thread: ups and downs on tundra 2 ?

  1. #1
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    Default ups and downs on tundra 2 ?

    hay guys i was just wondering if you all could tell me some of the ups and downs on the tundra 2
    i have a 1997.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I've got a Tundra, I believe the only difference on the 2 is the pogo stick front end.

    Upsides of the Tundra is it's light weight so tough to get stuck and easy to get unstuck. If you do get stuck, try just pulling the nose over, stand on back of the running boards and drive it out of the hole. The engine is simple and pretty bullet proof. It's an easy machine to wrench on. The narrow front end will weasle it's way through spots you can't fit a wider machine.

    Not many downsides. You won't be getting anywhere terribly fast, the track is an oddball pitch so you aren't going find a deal on replacement tracks, the track doesn't have deep lugs and swapping to a paddle track is a serious endevour due to the original track pitch and clerance around the drive shaft. The rear suspesion doesn't have much travel so you'll beat yourself to death over a rough trail. The lack of a paddle track really isn't a huge issue as you don't have a ton of hp.

    Great little machines and if you ever find a good deal on a used more modern suspension it's pretty easy to swap one in.

    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    ya i think the tundra 2 track is not as steep of a pitch

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Keep a good eye on your oil consumption. There is a plastic gear in your oiler that is prone to breakage.
    If you are not paying attention it will get ya.
    My 99 had it happen after 7 years or so.
    I used mine for icefishing and so I did a lot of short trips that took awhile to use up a tank of gas and I just didn't remember how much and when I added oil to it.
    Fortunately my dad was ble to rebuild it for me fairly easily.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Bravo LT is better.
    Ok, ducking now.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Ups and Downs on a tundra ll: the ups and downs can be painful on the back, so count on a knee on the seat......before the chiropractor counts the number of lumbars out of place.

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    Member Spookum's Avatar
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    Didn't the tundra twos get rid of the dumb track clips?

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Broken carb boots, loose recoil bolts, throttle cables for maintenence.

    Slow but sure. A bit tippy like the new ones. Incomfortable to sit and ride.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

  9. #9
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtofak View Post
    Broken carb boots, loose recoil bolts, throttle cables for maintenence.
    One lung machines = vibrating to death.

  10. #10
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    Downs: The steering brackets on the pogo-stick front shock system (the ones that look like a giant, over-sized cut-out from an old style skeleton key lock) are prone to breaking when abused, lack of height or profile in the track's lugs/cleets leading to less grab in powder than might otherwise occur, the engine's noise is louder than many machines with twice (or better) the engine size, the crouched sitting position if you're larger than the average 11 or 12-year-old, parts availability (for some items), front corners of the frame are prone to fracturing, but not too hard to repair with a weld, no odometer or hour meter, and probably a few more weaknesses or deficiencies I missed..


    Ups: Run for what seems forever when treated correctly, simplicity in design, no BS hanging off the front suspension to get tangled in brush, will pull a heck-uv-a load for long distances on very little fuel, better suspension than similar sleds of that vintage (Yamaha Bravo for example ;^>) ), tried and proven engine design, great learner machine..... and, from my observation, less likely to be stolen by serious thieves than some of the newer $10,000 machines.


    I bartered for a -very- well used '98 Tundra II R some years ago, and went through it thoroughly. I've taken it on numerous remote trips, it likely has well over 10,000 miles on it, and can haul a decent-size freight sled for 100 miles of ear-rattling distance on just over 6 gallons of fuel (6-1/2, maybe).

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