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Thread: What is best way to bolt down a gun safe?

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default What is best way to bolt down a gun safe?

    Delivery truck is on the way with a 39" x 66" 950 lb safe. Been reading online enough to know that bolting it down, or securing with anchors, etc.. is a good move. Problem is, I don't know much about gun safes or best way to accomplish this task. The safe is going to be on hardwood floors with crawl space access underneath. Thanks for any ideas on how to make this safe more secure.


    -Dan

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    Not sure about gun safes, but I have bolted down my Job Box full of tools before. Drill 4 holes in the bottom of the box/safe. If on a concrete floor, use a roto-hammer to drill holes into the concrete, through the holes per-drilled in the safe, to the size concrete anchors you want to use. I recommend 1/2" - 5/8". Drill the holes in the concrete at slight angles and that will make more difficult to pull out. There are 2 types, Tapcons and Wedge style. Your concrete floor will probably 4" thick so get bolts that are 4" + thickness of safe floor + 1". If wood floor, then use drill with standard bit and put through bolts through the floor with washers and nuts.

    You might also ask what the safe company recommends...

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    Delivery truck is on the way with a 39" x 66" 950 lb safe. Been reading online enough to know that bolting it down, or securing with anchors, etc.. is a good move. Problem is, I don't know much about gun safes or best way to accomplish this task. The safe is going to be on hardwood floors with crawl space access underneath. Thanks for any ideas on how to make this safe more secure.


    -Dan
    Drill holes thru safe and floor, get 3/8 threaded rod bolt rod thru floor and safe with fender washers and nuts on both ends, tighten should be 4 threaded rods at each corner , tighten then bugger up threads that are on outside of nut so it can't be undone without cutting
    Semper Fi!

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    http://www.chuckhawks.com/buying_gun_safe.htm

    http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/s...d.php?t=523374



    I would suggest beefing up the floor under the safe, or make sure it won't be falling through the floor from the weight of the safe. Pouring a concrete support would be best, not sure that would be a very fun task in a crawlspace though. Bolts will hold much better in concrete or a steel plate than wood.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Beefing up the the floor is a good idea. Pouring a concrete pillar would be very difficult. A simple pole jack would suffice and costs about $20-$30. You would want to build a support beam to place under the floor joists you are supporting. You should only have to support 2 or 3 joists so your beam would only need to be about 4-6' long. Maybe three 2x8's nailed together. Plenty stout.

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    What is your height between the dirt and the bottoms of the joists in the crawl space? I have seen some southern homes where if you weigh more than a buck fifty you can't fit in that gap.

    If it is a narrow space you can build concrete pads for posts to support the floor with a cross beam. You can use cinder blocks and wood wedges as posts.

    For bolts use as large a diameter grade 8 bolt you can find that will reach a plate under the joists.

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    Look you don't need to go overboard, depending on value of weapons it might be worth it to accept the loss if you have to build Knox
    Semper Fi!

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    Delivery truck is on the way with a 39" x 66" 950 lb safe. Been reading online enough to know that bolting it down, or securing with anchors, etc.. is a good move. Problem is, I don't know much about gun safes or best way to accomplish this task. The safe is going to be on hardwood floors with crawl space access underneath. Thanks for any ideas on how to make this safe more secure.


    -Dan
    Another option is outa site outa mind, lay it on its bak in the crawl space, no one will know its there and its way to heavy to lift out
    Semper Fi!

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    I prefer the Knox effect myself, well worth it and not that much effort, considering what's inside it.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Yep, that is what I am going for, the "knox effect".


    From the bottom of the joist to the dirt is about 3 feet.


    Thanks for the suggestions guys. I can always count on some good ideas here.


    I am wondering about the cardboard concrete pouring tubes. Like making supports for deck post. Other uses I am sure. Maybe running some metal rod from the safe down into the concrete while wet. Not sure what type of metal would work. Or maybe just running some bolts down to the concrete and drill it and secure the bolts (long bolts) to the concrete. Not sure about that, but adding concrete under the house seems like it would be quite effective. Only issue I am having is figuring out how to attach the safe to the concrete. I got holes in the bottom of the safe. Just not sure how to get metal rods, bolt, chain?? to the concrete below. Guess it would be 2 feet or longer to reach the concrete pillars (made from cardboard tubes) below. Thanks for any further suggestion.



    -Dan

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    Yep, that is what I am going for, the "knox effect".


    From the bottom of the joist to the dirt is about 3 feet.


    Thanks for the suggestions guys. I can always count on some good ideas here.


    I am wondering about the cardboard concrete pouring tubes. Like making supports for deck post. Other uses I am sure. Maybe running some metal rod from the safe down into the concrete while wet. Not sure what type of metal would work. Or maybe just running some bolts down to the concrete and drill it and secure the bolts (long bolts) to the concrete. Not sure about that, but adding concrete under the house seems like it would be quite effective. Only issue I am having is figuring out how to attach the safe to the concrete. I got holes in the bottom of the safe. Just not sure how to get metal rods, bolt, chain?? to the concrete below. Guess it would be 2 feet or longer to reach the concrete pillars (made from cardboard tubes) below. Thanks for any further suggestion.



    -Dan
    Reinforcing the floor is a good, if not possibly mandatory idea. I wound simply pour a concrete pad and install a support pier or post and a short 4x6 or 4x8 support beam. A screw post or concrete blocks as suggested by Ray are the best, most practical idea you're going to get IMO. I would use heavy all-thread rod to bolt through the floor and the support beam(s) you install beneath the floor joists. Trying to bolt down to the footer pad is not going to buy you any more in practical terms. Short of building an actual vault, this is the best you can really do.
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    I framed in a door smaller than the safe AFTER moving it in.

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    Mine sits on concrete, and it is anchored to the concrete with a whole bunch of rock climbing bolts.

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    Years ago I was helping a friend move and he said the last ting we had to move was his safe in the living room. I had never seen a safe there , even though I had been in that living room twice a week for 20 years. It turned out that he had a safe laying on its back.... He and his wife had decorated the outside with tile-work and made it look like a big artsy-fartsy coffee table. A raised cover went over the top and hid the dial and lever handle.
    I had been setting my drinks on that thing for years....
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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Years ago I was helping a friend move and he said the last ting we had to move was his safe in the living room. I had never seen a safe there , even though I had been in that living room twice a week for 20 years. It turned out that he had a safe laying on its back.... He and his wife had decorated the outside with tile-work and made it look like a big artsy-fartsy coffee table. A raised cover went over the top and hid the dial and lever handle.
    I had been setting my drinks on that thing for years....
    and thats a smart man. too late for this guy tho as he has his 1000$ safe posted on the internet for everyone too know about it, might as well posted it on ADN.com
    Semper Fi!

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    I would suggest spanning the inside of the safe with something like 1/8" bar stock, from bolt to bolt, then put your fender washers on top of that. The bar stock will help keep the safe steel from ripping should somone try and topple it with a truck or something. Put the same thing on the bottom side will help keep the flooring from tearing too.

    Putting it in a corner will help alleviate pry bar opening, if you haven't watched the videos on youtube you should, surprisingly easy to pry "typical" gun safes open with a long crow bar.

    I'm with you on fort knox, you've got the safe and the tools, might as well maximize effectiveness.

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Default What is best way to bolt down a gun safe?

    Determine where you want the safe.
    Using cardboard make a template of your safe bottom. Mark outside dimensions and bolt holes. The template needs to be accurate to 1/16 inch.
    Use template to determine the best safe layout and drill slightly oversized holes through the floor. Before this you need to make sure your door swing is clear and allows for a full door opening.
    Once the holes are drilled make plumb bobs with string and small bolts to mark the center of your pad locations in the crawl space.
    No matter which column system you choose you are going to need a footing pad 4 to 6 inches thick and a couple feet square to spread the load out. Rebar or hog wire will be needed to keep the pad supported internally.
    Once the pad is cured, you can install the uprights. Sono tubes would work. Cinder blocks would be easier, but harder to anchor to. Trying to anchor to the support columns is going to be difficult. I would make plates to go under your joists and bolt through them rather than anchor to the floor support columns.
    Plates out of oak or steel drilled to the same dimension as the template that span across at least four joists would be the best.

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    I have always looked at this like this; I had a woodstovebusiness for years and had to move stoves up and down stairs. The average smartguy has no clue on how to move 500# stove much less a 1000# box +15 to 20 gunsthat adds 100 to 150#. You have to move that box with a special dolly and itwill take at least 2 guys to do and will take time to get it out of the house.If itís in the garage that is a whole different story; but out of the house istough even with the right gear and know how.
    If you do not live at the house full time there again that is a different storybut if you do live there the chances of anyone getting that box out of yourhome in highly unlikely.

    I would suggest beefing up the subfloor with a littlesupport bracing because over time it will cause the floor to sag from theweight.

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    In my humble and professional opinion as a construction and concrete contractor, although a concrete footer would be good, it's not needed. I would simply put down about a 2" layer of 3/4 minus gravel and stack cinder blocks on that to the bottom of a cross beam (three 2x8's should be plenty) that supports the floor joists. Cinder blocks stacked 4 courses high will get you to about 30". The 2x8's will be about 7 1/4". Drive wedge type shims between the beam and floor joists to snug up the contact.

    Mixing and pouring concrete into sauna tubes will be extremely difficult in a crawl space. Good luck with that.

    To anchor the safe, I would simply drill the holes through the floor, then cut 2 pieces of 2x6, each long enough to cover 2 holes each (assuming 4 holes total) with the 2x6's extending past each hole about 6" on each side. Tack them to the bottom of the plywood subfloor. Go back and drill through the existing holes through the 2x6's. Place the safe and put hexhead through bolts through the holes with washers inside the safe and under the floor. In order to pull that safe up it would require pulling up 1 or 2 sheets of tongue and groove plywood subfloor.

    Another good idea might be putting up a sign that says we have alarms, surveillance cameras and pet rattlesnakes loose in the house.

  20. #20
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    ha ha ...

    I already have signs up by the drive way for the alarm, cameras, and guard dog

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