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Thread: Where to go from here

  1. #1
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    Default Where to go from here

    Hi all,

    As you can see from the pictures my square stern has seen better days. I am hoping for some suggestions on where to go from here. I talked to a friend that says he can help me fix it, but I am curious if it were patched would it be the same as it was? Is it worth it? Do I need a certain type of resign for these materials? Anything you can add would really be appreciated I have never dealt with anything like this before and I am open to any and all suggestions. I know I am getting advice from some of the best. Thanks

    photo(2).jpgphoto1.jpg

  2. #2
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    It's polyethylene the most inert plastic around. For something that structural, it wouldn't trust glues, not that it ever worked on polyethylene anyways.

    With that said, I would recommend a 3m marine sealant, and bolt a large 1 ft wide strip of UHMW down the entire length belly. Use bolts that are countersunk. Carriage bolts would works. Only use stainless hardware. bolt on both sides of the the keel to bend it over the keel. Make sure to rough up both surfaces before laying on an exteremely heavy coat of sealant. Make sure to have all the holes drilled first, to cut down mess. That would be the easiest and most permanent fix. You can get 1 ft x 1/4" strips from a plastics specialty shop. You need a backer on the inside to spread out the weight of the bolts, I recommend ripped pieces of synthetic decking, because you can countersink the bolts so they don't hit your boots. You will then have about four nice strengtheners on the inside. Put a 60 degree bevel on the inside backers, so they'll be comfortable to stand on.

    The boat will then be better than it was new. Congratulations on breaking a crosslink 3 hull, I thought they were indestructible from my experiences. How did you break that hull?

    PM me if you should need advice over the phone on what to get and where.

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    Member cristancanoe's Avatar
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    I want to know how you did that! Be aware the epoxy repair will not flex the same as the rest of the boat and may (or may not) give you issues with separation/cracking in the future. My suggestion would be to look into a plastic weld. Since the crosslink is solid (unlike royalex with the foam core) you can weld the edges together. Since it is a large area, I would then apply some epoxy or fiberglass over it for reinforcement. If the epoxy cracks in this case, you will still have a solid boat under it.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    mainah lady,

    Crosslink 3 ins't one layer, it's actually 3 layers. inner layer of polyethylene, rigid polyethylene inner foam core, and an outter layer of polyethylene. Epoxy won't stick to it, and not glues either. I really think he should scab it, with a new belly due to it's extensive damage.

    For those unfortunate folks who have to deal with damaged polyethylene, this is the best way. Case in point: Go ahead and damage an otter freight sled, you'll never get ahold of the company. The only way to fix the side damage/cracks, is to reinforce it with pieces of plywood. When you do that, you'll get another few years of service out of em.....and hey....they're cheap!

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Check out G/Flex epoxies from WEST Systems. Its new on the market. If you google "g/flex epoxy" you'll get a few plastic repair posts on various sites.

    Check out the Gougan brothers chainsawing and then repairing a poly kayak video. G/flex might be a decent solution for poly materials. I don't know if it will work on the stuff your canoe is made out of.

    http://www.westsystem.com/ss/g-flex-epoxy/

    Since you have also disrupted the core system on your hull even if the g/flex worked to join it back as well as it looks like it can, your hull may never return to the rigidity needed. So ask some questions of the WEST system folks as well as your canoe maker.

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    Thanks for the replies it is definitely a place to start. I knew this would be the place to come for advice.

    As to how I did it, I was going down rabbit slough in the dark for a duck weekend. I was almost all the way to the cabin and there was a stump floating downstream barely sticking above the water that I never saw until I was already on top of it. I run a 9.9 on her so I was probably going a little faster than I should have been, but I was being pretty conservative since I was in the dark (so I thought). The boat capsized and filled with water almost instantly. The only good news was at that point there was a hole cause without it I dont think I ever would of got enough water out to get it back to shore. Anyway, to make a long story short it was a long cold walk out, but I somehow recovered all of my gear.

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    Member cristancanoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    mainah lady,

    Crosslink 3 ins't one layer, it's actually 3 layers. inner layer of polyethylene, rigid polyethylene inner foam core, and an outter layer of polyethylene. Epoxy won't stick to it, and not glues either. I really think he should scab it, with a new belly due to it's extensive damage.

    For those unfortunate folks who have to deal with damaged polyethylene, this is the best way. Case in point: Go ahead and damage an otter freight sled, you'll never get ahold of the company. The only way to fix the side damage/cracks, is to reinforce it with pieces of plywood. When you do that, you'll get another few years of service out of em.....and hey....they're cheap!
    Ah, thanks for the correction Mainah dude. The didn't have the new fangled crosslink 3 when I lived there. So ignore my advice on welding, you will ruin a foam core that way.

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