Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 41

Thread: House Battery Question - What works the best

  1. #1

    Default House Battery Question - What works the best

    I'm about ready to replace the house battery and was wondering what you smart guys are doing. I currently have one marine heavy duty deep cycle and was considering a couple of the same type of battery or maybe switching to two 6 volts. What is the rest of you all doing. Two 12 volts or two 6 volts??
    I don't want real big battery's because of the weight. I run a fridge, heater, lights etc. One GOOD 12 volt battery works pretty well in the summer but winter time its not enough.

    Comments???

  2. #2
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    I am running four 6 volt GC-2 batteries from Costco in series and parallel. It gives me 400 Amp hours or so. I am pretty diligent about kicking the generator on once the hit 12.2 volts or 50% and I get two to three seasons out of them. This works for me.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  3. #3
    Member DMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    1,412

    Default House Battery Question - What works the best

    I have the same as Spoiled One. They are working well. I started with two 12volts and they sucked. so I changed to two 6 volts and then added two more. Best practice is to try and not let them drop below 50% and they will last longer.
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  4. #4

    Default

    As Pete said, golf cart batteries are really good. I have not tried the costco ones as I didn't even know they sold them, but I bet they are good as they are made by Johnson Control Group. Speaking of which, I have an 8 year old Kirkland car battery that still works fine.....probably time to change it out.....

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DMan View Post
    I have the same as Spoiled One. They are working well. I started with two 12volts and they sucked. so I changed to two 6 volts and then added two more. Best practice is to try and not let them drop below 50% and they will last longer.
    My personal experience says that 12 V batteries suck too.....Go with the commercial 6V batteries for sure and you'll be far happier

  6. #6

    Default

    As these guys have mentioned do keep the batteries up for the most part as they will charge correctly many more times that way.

    I personally prefer 12v gel cell batteries for hard discharges but 6v wet batteries can do a great job if you maintain them. My best pick to date is the Deka Dominator gel....I have a ton of happy powered wheelchair customers out there that use them hard and I have only replaced 1 (warranty inside of a year) in the last 7 years out of roughly 7-800 of the batteries used. I run 2 of these in the group 22 size and have left them outside all winter so far. While testing the charger on a friends boat in my yard we found 8 ruptured 6v wet batteries in his hold and I told him I would get him the Dekas and he said "why are they better?" so I turned the key on my boat and it fired right up. Keep in mind his charger only popped the circuit a month ago so he was fully charged til then...mine are the way I left them on my last outing in August. And as an added bonus they only weigh 55# and can be mounted in any direction like an Optima but are the normal square group 24 size.


    Heavy Hitter Fishing
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Heavy...54441957966186

    Kodiak Custom Fishing Tackle Pro-Staff


  7. #7
    Member DMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    1,412

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK2AZ View Post
    As these guys have mentioned do keep the batteries up for the most part as they will charge correctly many more times that way.

    I personally prefer 12v gel cell batteries for hard discharges but 6v wet batteries can do a great job if you maintain them. My best pick to date is the Deka Dominator gel....I have a ton of happy powered wheelchair customers out there that use them hard and I have only replaced 1 (warranty inside of a year) in the last 7 years out of roughly 7-800 of the batteries used. I run 2 of these in the group 22 size and have left them outside all winter so far. While testing the charger on a friends boat in my yard we found 8 ruptured 6v wet batteries in his hold and I told him I would get him the Dekas and he said "why are they better?" so I turned the key on my boat and it fired right up. Keep in mind his charger only popped the circuit a month ago so he was fully charged til then...mine are the way I left them on my last outing in August. And as an added bonus they only weigh 55# and can be mounted in any direction like an Optima but are the normal square group 24 size.
    I have heard good things about the Deka gel batteries.

    It sounds like your friend has a draw somewhere in the boat. Mine went 6 weeks through the cold snap and were still at 12.5 when I hit them with the charger. But mine are totally isolated with battery switches so there is no draw.
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    It hard to find a better battery for the price than 6v Golf cart batteries when used as a house battery. Just remember you have to charge a battery longer when you draw more power from it. Is there any way you can increase charging time or better yet reduce the load.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DMan View Post
    I have heard good things about the Deka gel batteries.

    It sounds like your friend has a draw somewhere in the boat. Mine went 6 weeks through the cold snap and were still at 12.5 when I hit them with the charger. But mine are totally isolated with battery switches so there is no draw.
    I honestly don`t know what happened with it...they (6v wet) were charged when parked and new this season. Isolated and off...We were shocked. Was pretty darn cold for quite a while though. Well, at least whoever buys it next season will have a large bank of nice batteries.

    On a side note...went to Seward to check on Jim`s other boat and found 10 dead Interstate group 27s...the man has no luck.


    Heavy Hitter Fishing
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Heavy...54441957966186

    Kodiak Custom Fishing Tackle Pro-Staff


  10. #10
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Idaho/Valdez
    Posts
    980

    Default

    I've heard enough on here about using twin 6 volts to give it a try...seems like this subject comes up regularly. So, how about a little instruction for us guys that need simple directions? And a few questions: if you don't have a generator on the boat, but twin 12v batteries, can you replace one of them with two 6-volts (in parallel?) and then, would the outboards charge them correctly, and do you only hook to the +- terminals of one battery?

    Next, say you go to two 6V for a house battery in a cabin onshore. Will a car charger unit that has a 6V switch charge them OK, and do you do each battery isolated when you charge or do you leave them hooked to each other and charge both at once, and if you do that, do you use 6V or 12 V? Remember, all, there is no such thing as a stupid question, well, at least not from me

  11. #11
    Member DMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    1,412

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK2AZ View Post
    I honestly don`t know what happened with it...they (6v wet) were charged when parked and new this season. Isolated and off...We were shocked. Was pretty darn cold for quite a while though. Well, at least whoever buys it next season will have a large bank of nice batteries.

    On a side note...went to Seward to check on Jim`s other boat and found 10 dead Interstate group 27s...the man has no luck.
    Yikes! I would say so. That's a lot of of gas money going into new batteries.
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  12. #12
    Member DMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    1,412

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cap'n Ron View Post
    I've heard enough on here about using twin 6 volts to give it a try...seems like this subject comes up regularly. So, how about a little instruction for us guys that need simple directions? And a few questions: if you don't have a generator on the boat, but twin 12v batteries, can you replace one of them with two 6-volts (in parallel?) and then, would the outboards charge them correctly, and do you only hook to the +- terminals of one battery?

    Next, say you go to two 6V for a house battery in a cabin onshore. Will a car charger unit that has a 6V switch charge them OK, and do you do each battery isolated when you charge or do you leave them hooked to each other and charge both at once, and if you do that, do you use 6V or 12 V? Remember, all, there is no such thing as a stupid question, well, at least not from me
    lots to say here. I will try and summarize and am happy to help walk you through it if you go this route.

    When connecting batteries together it is best practice to always use the same type of batteries. Which is why the house is usually isolated from the start batteries when the motors are not running.

    I would recommend getting a charger for the house batteries. I almost went without a charger and since having the charger I realized that my motors would have never had a chance to top off my house batteries unless I had a very long run home. It takes a while to top them off. I run a Xantrex TrueCharge2 40A.

    I know people that have 6v in their cabins as well. It works just like it would in a boat. You pair two 6v into a 12v and you charge them with a 12v charger. If you have more batteries than that you then tie each pair into a 12v series if that makes since. Lots of diagrams to help with this online just make sure you are using a meter to constantly be checking that you are at 12v and not at 36v or something. To create a 12v out of two 6v you connect the negative on one battery to the positive on the other battery. That leaves a positive open on one battery and a negative open on the other battery. The open terminals are the ones you connect to for 12v.

    I have four 6v, so two are tied into a 12v pair as are the other two, then the two 12v pairs are in series just like you would do with two 12v batteries. Works like a champ.
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  13. #13
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,022

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cap'n Ron View Post
    I've heard enough on here about using twin 6 volts to give it a try...seems like this subject comes up regularly. So, how about a little instruction for us guys that need simple directions? And a few questions: if you don't have a generator on the boat, but twin 12v batteries, can you replace one of them with two 6-volts (in parallel?) and then, would the outboards charge them correctly, and do you only hook to the +- terminals of one battery?

    Next, say you go to two 6V for a house battery in a cabin onshore. Will a car charger unit that has a 6V switch charge them OK, and do you do each battery isolated when you charge or do you leave them hooked to each other and charge both at once, and if you do that, do you use 6V or 12 V? Remember, all, there is no such thing as a stupid question, well, at least not from me
    If you want to replace your existing 12v with two 6v batteries you willl have to run them in series to avoid destroying them with the 12v charging system on your outboard(s). If your charger for the house batteries has a 6v setting you can charge them at the same time at that setting provided they are isolated, or are setup in paralell, not if set up in series.

  14. #14
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Here is an excellent read/tutorial on battery basics for the layman: http://www.batterystuff.com/kb/artic...ry-basics.html
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DMan View Post
    Yikes! I would say so. That's a lot of of gas money going into new batteries.
    Well since the Viking burns 150+ gph on step it's really just a day trips worth of fuel savings lost. lol


    Heavy Hitter Fishing
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Heavy...54441957966186

    Kodiak Custom Fishing Tackle Pro-Staff


  16. #16
    Member DMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    1,412

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK2AZ View Post
    Well since the Viking burns 150+ gph on step it's really just a day trips worth of fuel savings lost. lol
    OUCH!!!
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage and Seward
    Posts
    506

    Default

    House batteries for a big boat brings lots of options. 3 step chargers, monitors, high output alternators, isolators all come into play to make a system work for you. A great primer is David Smead's Living on 12 Volt's. He has a website with lots of good info. http://www.amplepower.com/ You can get carried away with this stuff if you're a techie!

  18. #18

    Default

    Also remember if you are using 2 6 volts batteries and one fails, you will be sol with your 12 volt system.

  19. #19
    Member cod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Ak.
    Posts
    2,214

    Default

    [QUOTE=DMan;1233149] lots to say here. I will try and summarize and am happy to help walk you through it if you go this route.

    When connecting batteries together it is best practice to always use the same type of batteries. Which is why the house is usually isolated from the start batteries when the motors are not running.

    I would recommend getting a charger for the house batteries. I almost went without a charger and since having the charger I realized that my motors would have never had a chance to top off my house batteries unless I had a very long run home. It takes a while to top them off. I run a Xantrex TrueCharge2 40A.

    I know people that have 6v in their cabins as well. It works just like it would in a boat. You pair two 6v into a 12v and you charge them with a 12v charger. If you have more batteries than that you then tie each pair into a 12v series if that makes since. Lots of diagrams to help with this online just make sure you are using a meter to constantly be checking that you are at 12v and not at 36v or something. To create a 12v out of two 6v you connect the negative on one battery to the positive on the other battery. That leaves a positive open on one battery and a negative open on the other battery. The open terminals are the ones you connect to for 12v.

    I have four 6v, so two are tied into a 12v pair as are the other two, then the two 12v pairs are in series just like you would do with two 12v batteries. Works like a champ.[/QUOTE

    PARDON.....But I thought I might try to clarify the last sentence above, as it appears to me to be in error. U have 4 six volt batteries. To make 2 of them be 12 v. one must SERIES them (positive to negative)-that will give you 12 volts on the 2 remaining posts. Do the same to the other remaining 2 six volt batteries. Now you will have two 'banks' of 12 volt batteries. If you want to keep them at 12 volts, you must now PARALLEL the remaining posts (Parallel means negative to negative or/and positive to positive connections on the terminals). In the middle of the last sentence in the quoted above the words "...the two 12v pairs are in series...." is in error unless you are wanting 24 volts. In summary, rmmbr this...PARALLEL = SAME VOLTAGE ....................SERIES = ADDS THE TWO VOLTAGES.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  20. #20
    Member DMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    1,412

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cod View Post

    PARDON.....But I thought I might try to clarify the last sentence above, as it appears to me to be in error. U have 4 six volt batteries. To make 2 of them be 12 v. one must SERIES them (positive to negative)-that will give you 12 volts on the 2 remaining posts. Do the same to the other remaining 2 six volt batteries. Now you will have two 'banks' of 12 volt batteries. If you want to keep them at 12 volts, you must now PARALLEL the remaining posts (Parallel means negative to negative or/and positive to positive connections on the terminals). In the middle of the last sentence in the quoted above the words "...the two 12v pairs are in series...." is in error unless you are wanting 24 volts. In summary, rmmbr this...PARALLEL = SAME VOLTAGE ....................SERIES = ADDS THE TWO VOLTAGES.
    Thanks for the clarity! My lingo was clearly off but you were right on my intent. I had the series and parallel backwards in my head. Thanks!
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •