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Thread: spray foam kit for boat interior

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    Member anonymous1's Avatar
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    Default spray foam kit for boat interior

    My boats interior is uninsulated, just raw aluminum. I have been thinking about cleaning it out wiping it down and shooting it with foam.
    I see there are several different kits..like http://sprayfoamequipment.ws/index.p...products_id=50
    Anybody have any advice or tips on DIY foam kits
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    There is alot more to it then that! Lots of prep needed!!!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by anonymous1 View Post
    My boats interior is uninsulated, just raw aluminum. I have been thinking about cleaning it out wiping it down and shooting it with foam.
    I see there are several different kits..like http://sprayfoamequipment.ws/index.p...products_id=50
    Anybody have any advice or tips on DIY foam kits
    So, this finished product will be exposed on the walls, ceilings, etc..not encased behind anything? You might check SBS...they have a boxed 2 part closed cell foam kit that could possibly work for you. Looks like shipping from the link you provided won't be cheap. There may be uniformly thick foam panels available locally that could save a lot of time and look a lot better than a spray product. I'd imagine there would be an insulation contractor or two on Kodiak. I'd quiz them. You never know, sometimes a pro job can end up much better for a price you can live with. They might also share tips to help make your project a winner if you are sold on doing it yourself. Good luck!

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    You might get an idea or two from this thread. http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...Material/page2

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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    I bought a DOW Froth Pak (I seem to think it was over 600 bdft of material) and it was about $700 for a 12x12 cabin including the ceiling. The cabin was empty. No prep needed, but make sure everything is either removed or covered as it is pretty messy... these little globs of the foam (pin head size) fly and land on things. Definately cover up completely. Also the temperature should be warm and not cold. It sticks to aluminum and wood and fiberglass just fine.

    Sobie2

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    Got this from another site, might be a easy install. Another thread on the same site mentioned using 3/8" cork tiles glued to the walls and hull sides.
    "In my sailboat the previous owner used peel and stick 3/8' cork wall tiles, It's been in there 18 years and works great without any mildew issues. It especially does a good job of deadening sound. "

    There is also a product called "paint a carpet", i had it on my old lobsterboat and it worked well for the condensation.

    From the other site,
    There is a plastic bubble wrap type of product sold by Menards (probably HD & Lowes as well) that is only about 1/4" thick and has what seems like an aluminum foil on both sides. The foil is much tougher than meets the eye so it may more likely be a mylar thin film.

    I have adhered it with 3M spray adhesive to the ceilings in the cabin and the wheelhouse before adding the headliner. Also covered the inside hull surfaces in the storage areas under the vee bunks and have found no need to protect it from the stuff stored there because it is tough enough on its own. Results (in Michigan) after two boating seasons: No more sweating, mildew smell has vanished, and even has sound attenuating value.

    The key is to separate warm moist air from cold surfaces, and it seems you don't need much insulation to achieve that.

    This product is cheap, easy to fit (cut with scissors), light, will not absorb water, and easy to install anywhere. I am still experimenting, but so far it has been all upside and no downside. You just can't lose trying it out as a solution for the kind of issues covered in this thread.

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    Steve - Have you tried gluing carpet (or anything else) to this insulation? I am in the process of insulating my cabin with Reflectix & thought about putting marine carpet on top of it for a little more sound deadening.
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    Default double bubble

    Thanks guys! Very helpful.
    I think I am reconsidering the spray foam idea (big mess) and maybe learning towards the foil double bubble idea (cheap no mess)
    http://www.ecofoil.com/All-Products/...FWrZQgodjC0Asg
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    Quote Originally Posted by akdeweyj View Post
    Steve - Have you tried gluing carpet (or anything else) to this insulation? I am in the process of insulating my cabin with Reflectix & thought about putting marine carpet on top of it for a little more sound deadening.
    Hi Dewey,
    No i haven't, i only had that "paint a carpet" on my lobsterboat and it worked well down in the forward of that boat. I think putting carpet over that foam would be kinda hard to make it look nice without getting sags and wrinkles in the carpet, if it were me i'd try just the bubble wrap first and you can always cover it later if it works good. If you want to spend some bucks look into Sounddown insulation they make all kinds of really nice sound deadening coverings. I worked on a Marco aluminum gillnetter that was done with the stuff and standing on top of a 3208 Cat we could talk to each other normally when running at cruise speed.

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    I just started researching this product..solexx..available in panels and rolls. Possibly more durable and/or a more finished look compared to some other materials discussed in the thread. I was thinking of using it for a lightweight lobsterboat style hard top for my Harvey. http://www.greenhousecatalog.com/pro...-panels#panel3 I'm going to request a sample so I can test it with different adhesives on wood, fiberglass and aluminum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    I just started researching this product..solexx..available in panels and rolls. Possibly more durable and/or a more finished look compared to some other materials discussed in the thread. I was thinking of using it for a lightweight lobsterboat style hard top for my Harvey. http://www.greenhousecatalog.com/pro...-panels#panel3 I'm going to request a sample so I can test it with different adhesives on wood, fiberglass and aluminum.
    Greenhouse style cabin ??

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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    Greenhouse style cabin ??
    Yup...I be growin' my turnips at sea...stay tuned.

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    How are you going to hold it together ? I don't think fiberglass will stick to it ?? maybe epoxy ? or aluminum angle and bolts ?? What kind of boat is a Harvey ??

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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    How are you going to hold it together ? I don't think fiberglass will stick to it ?? maybe epoxy ? or aluminum angle and bolts ?? What kind of boat is a Harvey ??
    It would be within a light wood frame. Outer edges would go in a quarter inch dado or routed slots across the fore and aft and the length of the longitudinal members... supported from below by cross members that also will define and maintain the slight arc. I requested a sample today just so I could test adhesives but all sides will be in slots so it would be a matter of caulking more than anything else. I'd use some light wood screws in conjunction with neoprene backed washers on the cross members to lock it all in...would require very few of them. Although they do beautiful work, I'm independently poor and can't bring myself to part with the $300 per ft. the pros want. I believe I could do the whole thing for $300 or thereabouts. Would be similar to this:
    http://www.archdavisdesigns.com/davis_jiffy22.html On the other hand, I do own a raincoat free and clear which may be how this all ends up. Below is my 20' Harvey bar dory that I finally got launched last Sept. I'm thinking this top for a 22' Harvey Alaskan Fisherman I bought as my next project but don't have a pic of it..similar to this, though.
    t

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    It would be within a light wood frame. Outer edges would go in a quarter inch dado or routed slots across the fore and aft and the length of the longitudinal members... supported from below by cross members that also will define and maintain the slight arc. I requested a sample today just so I could test adhesives but all sides will be in slots so it would be a matter of caulking more than anything else. I'd use some light wood screws in conjunction with neoprene backed washers on the cross members to lock it all in...would require very few of them. Although they do beautiful work, I'm independently poor and can't bring myself to part with the $300 per ft. the pros want. I believe I could do the whole thing for $300 or thereabouts. Would be similar to this:
    http://www.archdavisdesigns.com/davis_jiffy22.html On the other hand, I do own a raincoat free and clear which may be how this all ends up. Below is my 20' Harvey bar dory that I finally got launched last Sept. I'm thinking this top for a 22' Harvey Alaskan Fisherman I bought as my next project but don't have a pic of it..similar to this, though.
    t
    Now i remember your boat !! Yup with the fine entry lightweight is going to be key, just a simple windshield and a roof over your head would make it comfortable. How about something like this, more of a glorified phonebooth.



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    I'd like that just fine! A little concerned about windage. The boat is a flatty and light. Here's a link to a 3M surface guide that may be helpful to anyone trying to figure out the right adhesive for their projects http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3...duct-Selector/ This particular one seems to focus on spray adhesives but they have other guides for double stick tapes, etc. I used M77 when I stubbed pool noodels together for my under floor flotation. It worked great.

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    How well do the pool noodles hold up against Fuel and Chemicals?

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    Quote Originally Posted by pacific23 View Post
    How well do the pool noodles hold up against Fuel and Chemicals?
    Very well. Since mine is totally encased, my concern was possible reaction to cured epoxy. I did a test with green and cured epoxy and got no reaction. Discussing it on another forum, a Tolman builder said he soaked noodle material in gas for 2 weeks with no reaction. I have chunks soaking in motor oil, reg. gas, 2 stroke gas and acetone right now with the same results. I've also tested the blue and pink foam boards that some like to use. Probably just fine if protected but gas and acetone melt it on contact and canned spray enamel damages it.

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    Gary, thanks, that is some good info.

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    I am in the process of starting an aluminum boat project, and the hull is going to begin in a couple weeks. After spending time on the water in an aluminum boat in the past, I was wondering what would be the best way to insulate the hull; the deck will be welded on-diamondplate.
    I thought about spray foam, but I cant be sure that even the closed cell foam doesn't absorb water over many years. Also, I have read that the foam direct to the aluminum and any moisture sandwiched between will create corrosion issues.
    I have thought about using that reflectix type of insulation that potbuilder mentioned as well. I really think you don't need a lot of R-value, the aluminum bubble wrap stuff would probably suffice in two layers. When this aluminum skin is glued to an aluminum boat, I am thinking that if moisture ever gets between the insulation and boat aluminum, it will add to corrosion. While this might not be a big issue in the cabin, I am concerned about the hull, below water level. Does anyone have any input on this?
    What I thought as a solution for below deck would be to install the dimpled plastic foundation membrane (I.E: Superseal brand) against the aluminum hull and then spray foam over that with an inch or two of closed cell foam. I don't know how to post links to the product on here.... I was thinking that if water ever gets in the spray foam, hopefully it could somewhat drain to the back of the boat, bilge area through the dimples. It also would keep a bit of an air space to prevent water from being trapped between the foam and aluminum forever.
    Was wondering if anyone had any thoughts or experience on this. Ping pong balls or swim noodles are my other option......

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