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Thread: Rhubarb 2012

  1. #1
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    Default Rhubarb 2012

    I know many of you have huge rhubard plants and besides a few pies, wonder if there is something else to do with all of it. I started making wine with it in 2011 and just bottled my second vintage this week. Its fun to do, but takes some time. I started this batch in August. It tastes great at this time, but will improve with a couple more months in the bottle. For fun, I opened a bottle from 2011 and compared the two. The 2011 was much sweeter, but I virtually used the same recipe. The wine from this year was a little more cloudy. I think it was because I crushed the fruit a little more this this time. I went with 6 lbs of rhubarb for one gallon of water. It has a wonderfull pink color. I make 6 gallons at a time which makes for great gifts. I give most of it away since it wouldn't be good for me to drink all of it.

    Some people claim that their rhubarb wine will often turn clear, but mine has stayed a ruby pink. Another trick is to freeze the rhubard first. It breaks up the fiber and allows it to juice out better. I have another 30 lbs of cut and frozen rhubard in the freezer and will start another batch for a spring time bottling.

    This evening, I re-bottled some of the 2011 and mixed with the 2012 and added some white tannin to see how it would taste. It was a good mix. I now have three bottles of the 11/12 mix that I'll save fore a special occasion. I learned that a little tannin goes a long way. It just gave it a little bit of "bite" and dryness.



    Rhubarb Vin 2012.jpg

  2. #2
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coaldust View Post
    I know many of you have huge rhubard plants and besides a few pies, wonder if there is something else to do with all of it. I started making wine with it in 2011 and just bottled my second vintage this week. Its fun to do, but takes some time. I started this batch in August. It tastes great at this time, but will improve with a couple more months in the bottle. For fun, I opened a bottle from 2011 and compared the two. The 2011 was much sweeter, but I virtually used the same recipe. The wine from this year was a little more cloudy. I think it was because I crushed the fruit a little more this this time. I went with 6 lbs of rhubarb for one gallon of water. It has a wonderfull pink color. I make 6 gallons at a time which makes for great gifts. I give most of it away since it wouldn't be good for me to drink all of it.

    Some people claim that their rhubarb wine will often turn clear, but mine has stayed a ruby pink. Another trick is to freeze the rhubard first. It breaks up the fiber and allows it to juice out better. I have another 30 lbs of cut and frozen rhubard in the freezer and will start another batch for a spring time bottling.

    This evening, I re-bottled some of the 2011 and mixed with the 2012 and added some white tannin to see how it would taste. It was a good mix. I now have three bottles of the 11/12 mix that I'll save fore a special occasion. I learned that a little tannin goes a long way. It just gave it a little bit of "bite" and dryness.



    Rhubarb Vin 2012.jpg
    Coal Dust, I've been making "Pie Plant" (rhubarb) wine for a couple years now. I guess there are several ways to clear up wine, Things you can add, etc. However, I've found the best way is to siphon the wine into a clean carboy, let it set a couple weeks, then siphon it again into another clean carboy. However, unless your submitting your wine to something like the State Fair to be judged, a little sediment doesn't bother the wine at all. One thing you'll learn with rhubarb is it can be tricky. The hydrometer will tell you it's done working, and you don't see any bubbles rising, so you bottle it, and in a week or so with corks popping, you learn (the hard way) that it wasn't quite done working. However, if you can keep the bottles from popping the cork, the continued action will create carbonation which is the same thing as making Champagne..! I've learned over the years to wait til your sure it's done working, then wait just a little bit longer..

    Other options to consider are mixing the Rhubarb 50/50 with Strawberries or Raspberries. The Strawberry mix produces a nice light colored desert wine, where as the Raspberry mix for me to date has produced a wine that you shouldn't sample if you plan on doing any more driving that day.
    John

  3. #3
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    Rhubarb is one of the many things I look forward to each spring. Yes, pies are at the top of the list, but also jarred rhubarb/apple/walnut raisin pie filling is excellent. Rhubarb chutney is a close one as well. Rhubarb crisp, rhubarb ice cream topping, rhubarb bread, rhubarb relish to name but a few. I love the darn stuff. But I don't make rhubarb wine.

    M

  4. #4
    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    As a kid we dipped raw rhubarb in sugar and ate it like that a lot.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

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