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Thread: Knives are sharp and pointy..

  1. #1

    Default Knives are sharp and pointy..

    Ya'll know my story about moving up and all that.. so I won't get into that. If you don't.. just ask. So recently I went to Victorinox for something and found out the store is going out of business. Everything was 60 to 75 percent off. While I went in for one thing.. I found myself spending time looking at what was left of their knife collection. There wasn't much.

    After taking that hunting and trapping course Iíve realized how essential knives are. Iíve always had a fondness for them and as a woman probably a larger collection than most I know. However I didnít really have purpose for them except to have them in my pocket and look pretty and shiny when I pulled them out to show off.

    Now I have purpose.. but I want to make sure I have the right ones. I want to start learning how to make things with them. I want to carve. Not fun things, but useful things. Like a cup or bowl or this handy IPhone case that Iíve been drooling over that is ridiculously over priced at 280 dollars. I wonít even pay 30 bucks for a case.. let alone 280.

    Attachment 67268

    I want to start making my own stuffs with wood.. cause I love wood. I love the smell, the feel, the tree, the whole darned thing. But as usual and as Iíve mentioned throughout various posts on a variety of topicsÖ I donít have a clue as to what I am doing. But I want to learn! I had a few guys show me some hints about wood carving while we were making various figure four traps.

    So I bought these knives hoping that I could use them for carving. I figure I could use them or I could modify them if need be. A friend of mine is a black smith and taught me over the summer some basics to blacksmithing. I made a pretty heart shaped coat hook for some tourists. (Iím still a girl darn it!) Anyway.. I wanted to get your thoughts on these knives that I got for a ridiculous amount. I know that two of them are for hoof and claws, but Iíve been reading online how you can modify them to lessen the bend and use for carving. Any thoughts? Thanks!
    Attachment 67267

  2. #2
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Yes, I have used the farrier knives as "crooked knives with decent success.
    Going out of business, huh. Another one bites the dust.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Yes, I have used the farrier knives as "crooked knives with decent success.
    Going out of business, huh. Another one bites the dust.
    FYI.. this is an independent store.. not the entire company. Thanks for the confirmation!

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    hi mountaingirl,
    Here is a crude fork and spoon I made for my wife .
    I am poor wood carver but do enjoy messing with it.
    I feel the most important thing about carving or working with any edged tool is learning to put and keep a edge on it.
    That is great you got a taste of blacksmithing, one of my favorite crafts.
    To change the bend in your tools means taking the hardness out to reshape it, then reharden it and retemper it.
    I find that it is kind of tricky, so I would not advise it unless you want to learn the process and are willing to ruin a few tools.
    I think you can use your new knives as is.
    I also feel the second most important thing in carving is learning to read and not buck the grain.
    I think it is great that you are teaching yourself a craft.
    Don't forget to have a good time.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by oyster View Post
    hi mountaingirl,
    Here is a crude fork and spoon I made for my wife .
    I am poor wood carver but do enjoy messing with it.
    I feel the most important thing about carving or working with any edged tool is learning to put and keep a edge on it.
    That is great you got a taste of blacksmithing, one of my favorite crafts.
    To change the bend in your tools means taking the hardness out to reshape it, then reharden it and retemper it.
    I find that it is kind of tricky, so I would not advise it unless you want to learn the process and are willing to ruin a few tools.
    I think you can use your new knives as is.
    I also feel the second most important thing in carving is learning to read and not buck the grain.
    I think it is great that you are teaching yourself a craft.
    Don't forget to have a good time.
    That's awesome! After blacksmithing.. I think it might be hard for me to work on intricate tool heads.. but maybe there's a work around. Either way these ay work for now. Thanks for the response!

  6. #6
    Member ret25yo's Avatar
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    might not get allvthe replies expected if you want to cut up wood..

    If you cant stand behind the troops in Iraq.. Feel free to stand in front of them.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by ret25yo View Post
    might not get allvthe replies expected if you want to cut up wood..
    Why is that?

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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ret25yo View Post
    might not get allvthe replies expected if you want to cut up wood..
    No need to get scared man, I think she's referring to logs, not twigs, so you shouldn't be affected.

    ďLife has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.Ē ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaHippie View Post
    No need to get scared man, I think she's referring to logs, not twigs, so you shouldn't be affected.

    :: giggles ::

  10. #10

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    Youíll find plenty of uses for knives 1 and 4 in the kitchen and around the house. Knives 2 and 3 would be neat to work basswood, tulip poplar and other easily carved woods. The angles of there cutting edges will get into places other blades cannot.

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    A hand-carved spoon I did for our daughter for this past Christmas:


    Attachment 67282



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    Quote Originally Posted by oyster View Post
    Here is a . . fork and spoon I made for my wife .
    I am poor wood carver but do enjoy messing with it.
    I feel the most important thing about carving or working with any edged tool is learning to put and keep a edge on it. . .

    Agreed, oyster, anyone who can't put a razor's edge on a knife is best advised to leave them alone.


    Your fork and spoon look like a nice set of salad servers to me. If you like woodcarving, have you checked to see whether there's a club in your area? We've got a bunch down here that meets at the Sterling Senior Center, 1st and 3rd Saturdays of the month from September through May from 10 AM until 3 PM.


    Very enjoyable . . nice folks . . good inspiration . . good way to learn new techniques . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    A hand-carved spoon I did for our daughter for this past Christmas:


    Attachment 67282


    Hi Marcus,
    I learned something from your video and that makes my day.
    Plus your daughter has a lovely gift and that is better yet.
    Thank you

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    Agreed, oyster, anyone who can't put a razor's edge on a knife is best advised to leave them alone.


    Your fork and spoon look like a nice set of salad servers to me. If you like woodcarving, have you checked to see whether there's a club in your area? We've got a bunch down here that meets at the Sterling Senior Center, 1st and 3rd Saturdays of the month from September through May from 10 AM until 3 PM.


    Very enjoyable . . nice folks . . good inspiration . . good way to learn new techniques . .
    Marcus,
    This might sound nuts but I love to rub a rock on steel in the name of having it do what I need it to.
    I do like carving but I also like many other trades that seem to eat the calendar up.
    At some point I hope to do more of it.
    thanks again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by oyster View Post
    Marcus,
    This might sound nuts but I love to rub a rock on steel in the name of having it do what I need it to.
    I do like carving but I also like many other trades that seem to eat the calendar up.
    At some point I hope to do more of it.
    thanks again.



    Doesn't sound nuts to me at all, oyster, I prefer a hard Arkansas myself.


    Me too . . other interests, that is . . though when one gets my age, one starts to narrow them down.


    Good luck . . .

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    A hand-carved spoon I did for our daughter for this past Christmas:


    Attachment 67282
    What beautiful piece of craftsmanship! I have so much to learn! Thanks for sharing that video. I look forward to learning and doing this as I get more settled in my new home!

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