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Thread: Normal Bull Behavior?

  1. #1
    AniWahaya
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    Default Normal Bull Behavior?

    Depicted is a young bull driving a cow earlier today who obviously had 'other things' on his mind, sniffing around etc.. Is it unusual to see this type of behavior throughout the winter months? I've seen plenty of moose yarding together but this young man was diligently seeking attention.image.jpgimage.jpg

  2. #2

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    Just a young guy with a dream.

    Normal behavior for January, probably not. It's good to see that simply surviving is not the driving force in this instance.

    The big boys on the block got all the gals this fall and left him unfulfilled. He is looking for opportunity whenever it might present itself. Even in January. I would not call it unusual behavior. An adolescent bull with thoughts of sowing some oats.

  3. #3

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    Well, she's all dressed up with her necklace, so looks to be a mutual desire here.... ;) If she didn't want the attention, why go out all fancied up?

  4. #4
    AniWahaya
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    Ha! A day late and a tine short? I was curious in relation to environmental impacts on estrus cycles or the possibility that the cow could have a delayed cycle due to the conditions of the previous year and per say enough body fat to reproduce. It would be interesting to see if anyone else witnesses the same or a delay in calf birthing in the spring.

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    When a person tries to explain animal behavior we get it wrong most of the time because we think of the animal doing what a human would do or we look at what is happening for 10 min and not what has been going on for several days.

    To answer your question we need to know if the cow was serviced in sep/oct when she came into heat. If she was not she would come into heat again in I think 28 days this will continue for several month if she is not serviced. You may wonder why the bulls can not get the job done, well it because the cow will be in heat for around 24 hrs or less and she will loose interested in the bull after that.

    If the cow let the bull mount her my answer would be she was not service earlier and she is in heat. If the bull tried and she would have nothing to do with him my guest would be he trying to do what a bull tries to do.

  6. #6
    AniWahaya
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    Thank you for the response. This might seem a little too complicated for the subject matter but if a cow were to slip (abort) her calf due to malnutrition or stress would she then come back into estrus? Are bulls capable of producing the hormones necessary to breed any time of year?

    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    When a person tries to explain animal behavior we get it wrong most of the time because we think of the animal doing what a human would do or we look at what is happening for 10 min and not what has been going on for several days.

    To answer your question we need to know if the cow was serviced in sep/oct when she came into heat. If she was not she would come into heat again in I think 28 days this will continue for several month if she is not serviced. You may wonder why the bulls can not get the job done, well it because the cow will be in heat for around 24 hrs or less and she will loose interested in the bull after that.

    If the cow let the bull mount her my answer would be she was not service earlier and she is in heat. If the bull tried and she would have nothing to do with him my guest would be he trying to do what a bull tries to do.

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    I don't think they would because.

    The reason cow moose have a small window for being bread is because the Bears and wolves can't eat every calf if there all born at the same time, also they need to be born early enough in the spring to have a chance to grow large enough to survive the winter.

    As far as bulls go, I would say yes, they would be able to breed any time of the year. The bulls will never get a change to find out because they have the same problem a lot of guys have, finding a willing girl.

  8. #8
    AniWahaya
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    I suppose you're correct as it would seem a fruitless pursuit if the calf was born too early or too late. In re to the bulls haha perhaps men lack the determination that this young bull boldly displays.
    Thanks again.
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    I don't think they would because.

    The reason cow moose have a small window for being bread is because the Bears and wolves can't eat every calf if there all born at the same time, also they need to be born early enough in the spring to have a chance to grow large enough to survive the winter.

    As far as bulls go, I would say yes, they would be able to breed any time of the year. The bulls will never get a change to find out because they have the same problem a lot of guys have, finding a willing girl.

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    In addition, if the cow slipped her fetus due to malnutrition, she would be unlikely to go into estrous again until her fat reserves told her body that she was ready again, likely not until the next fall. Just like menses stopping for human women during times of famine.

    In blacktail and whitetail populations, hunters often capitalize on a "late rut" caused by unserviced does coming back into heat again. Have seen it a few times.

  10. #10
    AniWahaya
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    Interesting, thanks.. My curiosity stems from the difficult winter last year and any possible effects on the populations in the long run.

    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    In addition, if the cow slipped her fetus due to malnutrition, she would be unlikely to go into estrous again until her fat reserves told her body that she was ready again, likely not until the next fall. Just like menses stopping for human women during times of famine.

    In blacktail and whitetail populations, hunters often capitalize on a "late rut" caused by unserviced does coming back into heat again. Have seen it a few times.

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    Pregnant cows may be a lot more resilient than we think. A long time ago I was talking to a native and he told me when he live in Fairbanks they would only kill pregnant cows moose in December because they had rolls of fat. Big Bulls are the ones that have problems surviving the winter because they don't eat when they are in heavy rut.

  12. #12
    AniWahaya
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    Pregnant cows may be a lot more resilient than we think. A long time ago I was talking to a native and he told me when he live in Fairbanks they would only kill pregnant cows moose in December because they had rolls of fat. Big Bulls are the ones that have problems surviving the winter because they don't eat when they are in heavy rut.
    Hu.. Well, it would seem that a well nourished cow would be resilient but a malnutrition cow, without those fat stores, it seems would have a difficult time of it during the hard years. Even with a successful birth the milk would probably lack fat content and suck any remaining nutrients out of the cow. Back to the picture I'm going to think that particular cow was in estrus... Otherwise would the bull even pay attention?

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    Remembering what little it took when I was young, it would not take a lot to keep a young bull interested.

    I think your may be right about the cow, she would not tolerate the bull and just walk away. Even during the rut once a cow is service the bull can't keep her around.

  14. #14
    AniWahaya
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    Remembering what little it took when I was young, it would not take a lot to keep a young bull interested.

    I think your may be right about the cow, she would not tolerate the bull and just walk away. Even during the rut once a cow is service the bull can't keep her around.
    Isn't there a joke about that? The young bull vs. the old bull? I'll have to look that one up..

  15. #15
    AniWahaya
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    The Young Bull, Old Bull Story
    The younger bull turns to the older bull and says, "Look at all those cows. There are hundreds of them down there just begging to be serviced by a bull such as I. Let's run down into the valley and begin production on a few of those heffers..." The old bull smiles and turns to the young bull and advises, "Let us walk down young man and not just service a few but the whole herd!"

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