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Thread: Silly Girl Question

  1. #1

    Default Silly Girl Question

    I am living the dream and moving up to AK from Connecticut (in two weeks actually).

    I am very interested in hunting and processing meat.. however.. I don't know what I'm doing. I grew up with a girly-girl mom who thinks camping is a 3 star hotel.

    I have some guns, but have never gone hunting and I won't until I feel confident about respecting the animal that I kill by using the gifts it has given me in that kill.

    I don't have brothers, cousins, uncles or a dad to teach me.. but I really want to learn. How does one go about learning this stuff without the stigmata of being a chick wanting to play in the outdoors? I am very serious about this.

    I have recently taken some primitive trapping and baiting courses with the Tracker School from Tom Brown in New Jersey. I was thinking of starting small (rabbits) and working my way up to become familiar with the anatomy of an animal. Plus I still have to get all my licenses anyway for hunting.. so I have time.

    I would love suggestions and help.

    I have a dream to become self-sufficient. I now have a log cabin with a greenhouse.. but I like meat. It's tasty. Help me please!

  2. #2
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainGirl View Post
    I am living the dream and moving up to AK from Connecticut (in two weeks actually).

    I am very interested in hunting and processing meat.. however.. I don't know what I'm doing. I grew up with a girly-girl mom who thinks camping is a 3 star hotel.

    I have some guns, but have never gone hunting and I won't until I feel confident about respecting the animal that I kill by using the gifts it has given me in that kill.

    I don't have brothers, cousins, uncles or a dad to teach me.. but I really want to learn. How does one go about learning this stuff without the stigmata of being a chick wanting to play in the outdoors? I am very serious about this.

    I have recently taken some primitive trapping and baiting courses with the Tracker School from Tom Brown in New Jersey. I was thinking of starting small (rabbits) and working my way up to become familiar with the anatomy of an animal. Plus I still have to get all my licenses anyway for hunting.. so I have time.

    I would love suggestions and help.

    I have a dream to become self-sufficient. I now have a log cabin with a greenhouse.. but I like meat. It's tasty. Help me please!
    check out the Becoming an Outdoor Woman program.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    check out the Becoming an Outdoor Woman program.
    OMG. I wish I could hug you right now.

  4. #4
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    Default cheap class

    Look up Alaska's Fish and Game web site; find a hunter ed class this winter or spring and sign up. Doesn't cost much at all. It covers a few to many of the new-guy topics you mention.

    And another reason its a good place to start is that its a required course anyway before you can buy a hunting license. You only must attend (and pass) one time in your life, then you're good. You'll get a hunter ed number all your own from that class that must be used on every hunt application the rest of your life.

    Since you're new I'd recommend avoiding the "online" course and instead opt for the more traditional, in person course. You might also meet someone in that class that might share a hunting spot with you, or give you more suggestions.

    These classes are meant to be very educational, yet enjoyable. The pass-rate for students in this class likely exceeds 99.99%, so don't think you need to study up some other thing before taking this class. The only thing you have to be able to do before this class is to shoot a .22 straight. And even kids that have never shot a rifle in their life before can pass this course, so don't be scared of it. Half or more of the class might be 10-14 yo kids (and their parents are welcome to attend all classes with them), and the rest of the students are adults, typically.

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...untered.tbasic

  5. #5

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    I just signed up for a three day workshop for:
    Small Game Hunting
    Black Bear Hunting 101
    Moose Hunting 101
    Wildlife Tracking
    Skinning & Hide Prep
    Butchering Wild Game
    Get Your Edge (knife techniques and sharpening skills)

    This is so exciting!!!! I can't beleive how happy I am right now.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    Look up Alaska's Fish and Game web site; find a hunter ed class this winter or spring and sign up. Doesn't cost much at all. It covers a few to many of the new-guy topics you mention.

    And another reason its a good place to start is that its a required course anyway before you can buy a hunting license. You only must attend (and pass) one time in your life, then you're good. You'll get a hunter ed number all your own from that class that must be used on every hunt application the rest of your life.

    Since you're new I'd recommend avoiding the "online" course and instead opt for the more traditional, in person course. You might also meet someone in that class that might share a hunting spot with you, or give you more suggestions.

    These classes are meant to be very educational, yet enjoyable. The pass-rate for students in this class likely exceeds 99.99%, so don't think you need to study up some other thing before taking this class. The only thing you have to be able to do before this class is to shoot a .22 straight. And even kids that have never shot a rifle in their life before can pass this course, so don't be scared of it. Half or more of the class might be 10-14 yo kids (and their parents are welcome to attend all classes with them), and the rest of the students are adults, typically.

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...untered.tbasic
    Thanks for the advice! Much appreciated. I will definitely look into this!

  7. #7
    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    ADF&G runs the program Frostbitten referred to: http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...reducation.bow

    Also, every Spring in Los Anchorage there is the Great Alaskan Sportsman Show, it usually has clinics for beginners: http://greatalaskasportsmanshow.com/

    You have to have one year residency to qualify for a resident hunting/fishing/trapping license, as well as resident tags, that should give you time to get settled in and start getting your bearings.
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaHippie View Post
    ADF&G runs the program Frostbitten referred to: http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...reducation.bow

    Also, every Spring in Los Anchorage there is the Great Alaskan Sportsman Show, it usually has clinics for beginners: http://greatalaskasportsmanshow.com/

    You have to have one year residency to qualify for a resident hunting/fishing/trapping license, as well as resident tags, that should give you time to get settled in and start getting your bearings.
    One year.. huh? That's fine.. give me time to learn the land and animals, take classes and perfect my skills. This is so freaking awesome I want to cry... over a beer.. by a fire pit.. petting my dog.

  9. #9
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Although you have to wait a year to obtain a resident hunting license, it does not mean you can not participate in hunts. If I had a moose down and you wanted to help and learn, I'd let you. You can do hunts with a camera. Back packing trips to try out new gear and all kinds of things you could try.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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  10. #10
    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    I should have been more succinct. Until you achieve residency status you can still hunt/fish, it'll just require a non resident license/tags, which are significantly higher priced.
    However, I'm sure there will be guys (and gals) that'll invite you out to moose camp (yeah, be careful in that selection process), so you can see how it's done as well as help out with all that goes with hunting up here.
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    Although you have to wait a year to obtain a resident hunting license, it does not mean you can not participate in hunts. If I had a moose down and you wanted to help and learn, I'd let you. You can do hunts with a camera. Back packing trips to try out new gear and all kinds of things you could try.
    Thanks for the info. I feel like such a NOOB.. but everyone has to start somewhere.. At least now I have the option of starting!

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaHippie View Post
    I should have been more succinct. Until you achieve residency status you can still hunt/fish, it'll just require a non resident license/tags, which are significantly higher priced.
    However, I'm sure there will be guys (and gals) that'll invite you out to moose camp (yeah, be careful in that selection process), so you can see how it's done as well as help out with all that goes with hunting up here.
    Succinct.. Good word! I have met a few people on this site already that I've been texting and getting to know . I might feel comfortable enough in person with a few of them.. as long as it's a married couple or something to that effect. Not looking for single men to take me camping or hunting.. Gotta play it safe until I know people..

    I feel pretty confident with this BOW though. I am sure to make connections there that allow me to learn and feel safe.

  13. #13
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    My wife took apart an elk during a BOW class and had a great time.

    She came home with a bunch of caribou and elk meat too. Yum.

  14. #14
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    I took the BOW ice fishing class after moving up (had never ice fished before, wanted to know about gear and mostly about tactics) and not only did I learn enough to basically destroy my work ethic (give a woman a fish and she'll eat for a day - teach a woman to ice fish and you'll never see her again), I had a great time - excellent instructors and a lot of fun during the class. Caught a couple of fish and took 'em home. A friend with virtually no outdoors experience took the three-day weekend, had a blast, and really improved her skills.

    I didn't fish during my first year up here because of the cost of the visitor license (a matter of principle - you can get a drivers license and register to vote pretty much immediately, but not get a resident hunting/fishing/trapping license), and it drove me nuts - I missed a year of fishing. If I had it to do over again I'd pop for the non-resident license. Depends how badly you want to get out there.

  15. #15
    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    a way to a mans heart is thru his stomach, take some cooking lessons.
    Semper Fi!

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by nittanytbone View Post
    My wife took apart an elk during a BOW class and had a great time.

    She came home with a bunch of caribou and elk meat too. Yum.
    Cool! I'm excited about that!In the Butchering Wild Game class you have to pay extra for meat.. I think I can take that home with me.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by mlshore View Post
    I took the BOW ice fishing class after moving up (had never ice fished before, wanted to know about gear and mostly about tactics) and not only did I learn enough to basically destroy my work ethic (give a woman a fish and she'll eat for a day - teach a woman to ice fish and you'll never see her again), I had a great time - excellent instructors and a lot of fun during the class. Caught a couple of fish and took 'em home. A friend with virtually no outdoors experience took the three-day weekend, had a blast, and really improved her skills.

    I didn't fish during my first year up here because of the cost of the visitor license (a matter of principle - you can get a drivers license and register to vote pretty much immediately, but not get a resident hunting/fishing/trapping license), and it drove me nuts - I missed a year of fishing. If I had it to do over again I'd pop for the non-resident license. Depends how badly you want to get out there.
    Between starting up my business and getting setteled and learning everything.. I think I might be ok with waiting. We'll see though!

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by greythorn3 View Post
    a way to a mans heart is thru his stomach, take some cooking lessons.
    That I don't really have to worry about. I am an excellent cook. I cook everything from award winning chili to Indian, Chinese, Thai, Italian and the yummy stuff like wings and burgers. I make an excellent flaming raspberry wing (hot and sweet). I've been told I should open up a catering or restaurant business. I’m a bit sensitive though sometimes when it comes to people not appreciating the hard work I do. I find that I put my heart and soul into things. I know I would if I started those businesses. People change when you make them a meal versus them buying one. Different expectations and results. They get more whinny about it.. so I prefer to have my dinner parties and bring dishes to potlucks where I can be appreciated versus criticized. Not that I don’t mind that occasionally though. One cannot grow and improve without a different person’s perspective on things.


    I need to learn more how to get to and preserve the meat once I've killed the animal.

  19. #19
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    The reason for the saying “a way to a mans heart is thru his stomach” has nothing to do with food or cooking. The rib cage is in front of the heart so it easier to cut open his stomach to cut out his heart.
    How else would a girl find if a heart less guy has a heart?

    Come to think of it this is NOT the thing to tell a girl that wants to learn how to butcher an animal.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    The reason for the saying “a way to a mans heart is thru his stomach” has nothing to do with food or cooking. The rib cage is in front of the heart so it easier to cut open his stomach to cut out his heart.
    How else would a girl find if a heart less guy has a heart?

    Come to think of it this is NOT the thing to tell a girl that wants to learn how to butcher an animal.
    I just love this forum.. just. love. it. Thanks for a great response.

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