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Thread: Kodiak Bear Areas

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    Default Kodiak Bear Areas

    I'm a little confused over the drawing hunt supplement on the Kodiak bear areas. Many areas have a note that states: all or much of the area is in an exclusive guide area. Does this mean a resident hunter can't hunt those areas? How do you determine the boundaries?

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    Not at all it is a restriction for other guides. Has nothing to do with residents. What it boils down to is if you are a non resident and not 2nd degree and want to hunt that area you have to hire that guide....

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    Member AKRecurveAssassin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Not at all it is a restriction for other guides. Has nothing to do with residents. What it boils down to is if you are a non resident and not 2nd degree and want to hunt that area you have to hire that guide....
    Bear is correct, the boundaries only determine where the guide's areas are, and it helps guides know where their boundaries are so they dont go into another guides area. in no way shape or form does this restrict a resident from flying in and hunting the area. One thing to watch out for on Kodiak though is Native Land... If the hunt is on native land, then you have to pay a separate fee to the corporation which owns it.

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    Member Hughiam's Avatar
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    Correct me if Im wrong those with more knowledge.....But most of those guide only areas cannot be accessed with a plane as the guides are the only ones that transport into those areas. My cousins brothers uncles nephew told me that most of the fly in areas that are in guide only areas are inaccessable as no air service can take you there.

    Remember, this is coming from a guy whose lived up here only 114 days.

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    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    You can access via plane. The trouble maybe that some guides may have deals with transporters to not drop guys in that area.

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    If the first transporter turns you down keep calling the rest, you will eventually find one that will take you in there. Some guides use one specific transporter year after year so that transporter is not going to loose their meal ticket taking you into the guides area. Don't tell the guide who you are flying with as they may try to persuade your transporter into dropping you somewhere else, thank you PC.

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    Member AKRecurveAssassin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abel View Post
    You can access via plane. The trouble maybe that some guides may have deals with transporters to not drop guys in that area.
    Abel is correct, no areas on kodiak are closed off to residents. and as bronco said, some transporters take guides and thier clients in year after year after year, and they don't like taking non-guided hunters into some areas, so go to another transporter. the whole island is accessible, even Halibut bay, and it is the farthest flying point from kodiak!

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    Member Ernie Scar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKRecurveAssassin View Post
    Abel is correct, no areas on kodiak are closed off to residents.
    Not saying you're wrong but I ran into a situation this fall where the guide with exclusive rights to a certain area has a deal going with the Akhiok Native Corporation where they will not sell land use permits to residents until after the 14th of November. This ultimately keeps resident bear tag holders as well as deer hunters out of a large portion of the unit for the first half of the hunt. Had I known this ahead of time I would not have applied for this area. The guide has a pretty good deal going for himself as he's eliminated all resident pressure while he is working. I was able to speak with one of the other 2 permit holders for that area while we were on the ferry going to Kodiak and like me he didn't find this bit of information out until after he'd drawn the tag and also like me his plans for the hunt were way different than he originally intended.

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    just shows on money talks. and at some point "most" will sell out in some capacity....bottom line though is the native corp had every right to do that. And before i apply for a tag i contact the land owners and check on all the permit status to avoid suprises like this, just to make sure if i do draw the tag i can pull the hunt off. never apply blind if you can help it. still feels like the shaft though.
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    Member AKRecurveAssassin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    ....bottom line though is the native corp had every right to do that.
    not to start any kind of argument or anything... but what gives a native corportation any more right to a piece of land than us??? and i find it highly unfortunate that money talks in this manner. everyone has equal rights to hunt any animal on any piece of land. Ernie, I'm sorry to hear what happened to you about your hunt. It isn't right. if you dont mind me asking, what part of kodiak were you trying to reach? and did you have any success?

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKRecurveAssassin View Post
    not to start any kind of argument or anything... but what gives a native corportation any more right to a piece of land than us???
    They own it, thus it is private property, and thus they have every right to control access. You may not agree with how land was allocated to Native Corporations through ANCSA, but it was done and is legally binding. There are things that drive me absolutely mad about how the land selection process was handled, but that's not really the issue here.

    It is simply not true that everyone has equal rights to hunt any animal on any piece of land. Private property laws give landowners the right to control access to their land, as it should.

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    ya its private property and they controll access to it, just like your neighbor owns his...pretty self explainatory. and yes it is very very unfortunate that money talks in just about every situation.
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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKRecurveAssassin View Post
    not to start any kind of argument or anything... but what gives a native corportation any more right to a piece of land than us???
    Yup...not any different than you putting a "No Hunting" sign up on your own property......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    My mistake

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