Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28

Thread: Some rambling thoughts on the ammo "Hoarding".

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default Some rambling thoughts on the ammo "Hoarding".

    The other threads seem to get so far off track it is difficult to get them back on course but I'll add my two cents about no ammo and "hoarding". First off the term hoarding seems out of place for most of us, myself included. Yes, I keep a couple of cases of .22's on hand as well as a nice supply of powder, primers, bullets, and alloy. I also keep a 25 pound bag of rice and one of beans in a plastic container just in case. Also have a transfer switch at my house connected to a generator in case the power goes out. This isnt hoarding, its just being prepared for an emergency that we hope never happens. I am not worried about any proposed ammo taxes or big goverment taking over, blah blah blah. I'm not going to bury anything so the "man" can't find it.

    Why do I stock up on reloading supplies and ammo? Mostly because I like saving money. I buy stuff on sale, clearance, close out, etc. Watch the classifieds and pick up good buys on powder, bullets, etc from people moving out. Last night was loading up some .44 mags and the price on the box of the CCI primers was $1.59 and Pay n Save. I still have powder that cost $8 a pound from Longs Drugs.

    You dont have to be rich to stock up. I had a rule for a long time that on every pay day I would buy either a box of bullets, pound of powder, or brick of primers. This rule came into place simply because I hated running out of anything. Real PITA to try to locate one specific thing in Alaska when you must have it. Most of the time you can't find it, so buy it when you can. Last time we tried to do a group powder buy (about 7 months ago) could not generate enough interest to even get it off the ground. And that was saving about 25% on 8 pound jugs. Bet more than a few of you are regretting that one.

    If you don't reload, start. Buy one piece at a time. Press, trimmer, powder measure, etc. Components, same thing. Make a plan and stick to it. Don't put it off, start right now. You will be loading better ammo at a cheaper price, whats not to like? If you are new to the game of reloading it is understandable you can be low or out of components but you seasoned loaders who don't have a stock of primers or powders all I can say is shame on you. Same goes for .22 ammo. A month ago most stores I were in had full shelves of rimfire ammo. CMP still has it in stock, but for how long?

    Hope I don't sound like I am preaching to the choir here.

  2. #2
    Member Tearbear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,986

    Default

    Nothing wrong with being 'prepared' in the event of an emergency...of any kind.
    "Grin and Bear It"

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Girdwood
    Posts
    1,123

    Default

    If I can't read the No-smoking sign in the powder room, would that make me a hoarder?

  4. #4
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    Good on ya.
    I too keep a pantry full of food stuffs. I wish I had a generator hard wired but don't right now. I'm working on that.
    I do have a wood stove and plenty of wood to keep warm if the power goes out.
    I have decided to keep more ammo and makings for this reason: in any eventuality, law and order can break down. What if the troopers and other authorities are dealing with mass fatalities and loss of infrastructure? What if we are talking about weeks, and people want to take what you have, leaving you no recourse but to protect your family yourself? Will it take a box of ammunition, or more than that? Ammunition may be good for barter as well. Having plenty of ammo, and the ability to make more, also gives one flexibility to practice more, and practice is a good thing.

  5. #5
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    Extra ammo makes more sense than money in a mattress.JMOFO
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Eagle River AK
    Posts
    400

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    The other threads seem to get so far off track it is difficult to get them back on course but I'll add my two cents about no ammo and "hoarding". First off the term hoarding seems out of place for most of us, myself included. Yes, I keep a couple of cases of .22's on hand as well as a nice supply of powder, primers, bullets, and alloy. I also keep a 25 pound bag of rice and one of beans in a plastic container just in case. Also have a transfer switch at my house connected to a generator in case the power goes out. This isnt hoarding, its just being prepared for an emergency that we hope never happens. I am not worried about any proposed ammo taxes or big goverment taking over, blah blah blah. I'm not going to bury anything so the "man" can't find it.

    Why do I stock up on reloading supplies and ammo? Mostly because I like saving money. I buy stuff on sale, clearance, close out, etc. Watch the classifieds and pick up good buys on powder, bullets, etc from people moving out. Last night was loading up some .44 mags and the price on the box of the CCI primers was $1.59 and Pay n Save. I still have powder that cost $8 a pound from Longs Drugs.

    You dont have to be rich to stock up. I had a rule for a long time that on every pay day I would buy either a box of bullets, pound of powder, or brick of primers. This rule came into place simply because I hated running out of anything. Real PITA to try to locate one specific thing in Alaska when you must have it. Most of the time you can't find it, so buy it when you can. Last time we tried to do a group powder buy (about 7 months ago) could not generate enough interest to even get it off the ground. And that was saving about 25% on 8 pound jugs. Bet more than a few of you are regretting that one.

    If you don't reload, start. Buy one piece at a time. Press, trimmer, powder measure, etc. Components, same thing. Make a plan and stick to it. Don't put it off, start right now. You will be loading better ammo at a cheaper price, whats not to like? If you are new to the game of reloading it is understandable you can be low or out of components but you seasoned loaders who don't have a stock of primers or powders all I can say is shame on you. Same goes for .22 ammo. A month ago most stores I were in had full shelves of rimfire ammo. CMP still has it in stock, but for how long?

    Hope I don't sound like I am preaching to the choir here.
    I pretty much take the same approach as what you have outlined. No real hoarding here, but do end up with good supplies of some things due to catching sales and stocking up, or finding buys on forums from individuals moving or getting out of reloading, ect... I am with you on it is a real pain running out of something and having to make a special trip to get it. Just nice having a good supply and as is gets low, replenish before running out. I think in this day and age, I have somewhat changed my thinking on what is a reasonable supply to have on hand with the constant supply shortages. I have plenty of powder now, but will get in on the next bulk powder/primer buy if there is one. Hoping that with Bass Pro Shop coming up this summer and Cabela's in 2014, it will at least increase the stocks of reloading components and ammo in the Anchorage area where maybe we will not see so many empty shelves, but I guess time will tell.

  7. #7
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    After the last shortage 4 years ago I went about keeping more componets on hand. I'd picked up items here and there so that now I don't have to worry if items I use aren't available for another 6 months, I've got what I need.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  8. #8
    Member tabmarine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Just yards from the Big Su
    Posts
    328

    Default

    Well down here in Florida we keep stockpiles of food, water, emergency radio, gasoline, medications,and alot of people have
    generators for the Hurricanes that are inevitable. This is encouraged in adds on TV and Radio. After being through several
    Hurricanes including Andrew in 92' I can tell you things go south in a hurry. People waiting in blocks long lines for ice and water.
    Long gas lines (if the station has power) empty supermarket shelves and short tempers are the norm. It is not uncommon to
    see a business owner standing in front of his damaged business with a shotgun or AR. Looting and hysteria follow
    purpetrated by the ones who had not prepared.
    If we all agreed....this would be no fun

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    2,145

    Default

    So what is a "hoarder", or "person who is hoarding"? How much of what, and who, defines "hoarding".

    The definition will be quite different if asked on a Fudd forum versus a firearms enthusiasts forum so why even bring it up?
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Girdwood
    Posts
    1,123

    Default

    Hoarders .... like on the TV show ... you know there's a problem if you have a bunch of dead cats under the ammo stash.

  11. #11
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wet eNuf View Post
    ... you know there's a problem if you have a bunch of dead cats under the ammo stash.
    I have never found a problem with dead cats...anywhere..

  12. #12
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tanana Valley AK
    Posts
    7,217

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    The other threads seem to get so far off track it is difficult to get them back on course but I'll add my two cents about no ammo and "hoarding". First off the term hoarding seems out of place for most of us, myself included. Yes, I keep a couple of cases of .22's on hand as well as a nice supply of powder, primers, bullets, and alloy. I also keep a 25 pound bag of rice and one of beans in a plastic container just in case. Also have a transfer switch at my house connected to a generator in case the power goes out. This isnt hoarding, its just being prepared for an emergency that we hope never happens. I am not worried about any proposed ammo taxes or big goverment taking over, blah blah blah. I'm not going to bury anything so the "man" can't find it.

    Why do I stock up on reloading supplies and ammo? Mostly because I like saving money. I buy stuff on sale, clearance, close out, etc. Watch the classifieds and pick up good buys on powder, bullets, etc from people moving out. Last night was loading up some .44 mags and the price on the box of the CCI primers was $1.59 and Pay n Save. I still have powder that cost $8 a pound from Longs Drugs.

    You dont have to be rich to stock up. I had a rule for a long time that on every pay day I would buy either a box of bullets, pound of powder, or brick of primers. This rule came into place simply because I hated running out of anything. Real PITA to try to locate one specific thing in Alaska when you must have it. Most of the time you can't find it, so buy it when you can. Last time we tried to do a group powder buy (about 7 months ago) could not generate enough interest to even get it off the ground. And that was saving about 25% on 8 pound jugs. Bet more than a few of you are regretting that one.

    If you don't reload, start. Buy one piece at a time. Press, trimmer, powder measure, etc. Components, same thing. Make a plan and stick to it. Don't put it off, start right now. You will be loading better ammo at a cheaper price, whats not to like? If you are new to the game of reloading it is understandable you can be low or out of components but you seasoned loaders who don't have a stock of primers or powders all I can say is shame on you. Same goes for .22 ammo. A month ago most stores I were in had full shelves of rimfire ammo. CMP still has it in stock, but for how long?

    Hope I don't sound like I am preaching to the choir here.
    +1. I have a few miscellaneous component items on my shopping list, but haven't even bothered to waste the trip to the store right now. Will wait until the panic subsides and there are items on the shelves again. All you can do is shake your head at the silliness and wait it out.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  13. #13
    Member Music Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    1,243

    Default

    Don't forget to stock up on toilet paper too, remember what happened in Anchorage.

    If anyone can remember, the early 70ís everything was in short supply especially oil. When Americans heard the word shortage, they would jump out and purchase these items since they knew what it was like standing in line to get gasoline for their cars.

    Well, whether you believe it or not, there was a toilet paper shortage in the United States in 1973. The entire episode started with a Johnny Carson Tonight Show monologue. On December 19, 1973, the writers for the show had heard earlier the federal government was falling behind in getting bids to supply toilet paper and that it might be possible that in a few months the United States could face a shortage of toilet tissue. They took the words of this Wisconsin congressional representative, Harold Froehlich and decided to add a joke for Carson for the evening show.

    Carson did in fact use the joke in a monologue stating, "You know what's disappearing from the supermarket shelves? Toilet paper. There's an acute shortage of toilet paper in the United States."

    Much to the amazement of not only the show but of toilet paper factories across America, 20 million people that watched the Carson show that evening ran out in the morning and bought as much toilet paper as they could carry. By noon on December 20, 1973, practically every store in America was out of stock. Many of the stores tried to ration this valuable paper but they could not keep up with the demand no matter what they did.

    A few nights later, Johnny Carson explained there was no shortage and he apologized to his viewers. However, this did not help with the scare. As soon as people noticed the empty shelves, they wanted this paper even more.

    It took a total of three long and grueling weeks to get the shelves stocked again and finally the shortage was over.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

  14. #14
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Music Man View Post
    Don't forget to stock up on toilet paper too, remember what happened in Anchorage.

    If anyone can remember, the early 70ís everything was in short supply especially oil. When Americans heard the word shortage, they would jump out and purchase these items since they knew what it was like standing in line to get gasoline for their cars.

    Well, whether you believe it or not, there was a toilet paper shortage in the United States in 1973. The entire episode started with a Johnny Carson Tonight Show monologue. On December 19, 1973, the writers for the show had heard earlier the federal government was falling behind in getting bids to supply toilet paper and that it might be possible that in a few months the United States could face a shortage of toilet tissue. They took the words of this Wisconsin congressional representative, Harold Froehlich and decided to add a joke for Carson for the evening show.

    Carson did in fact use the joke in a monologue stating, "You know what's disappearing from the supermarket shelves? Toilet paper. There's an acute shortage of toilet paper in the United States."

    Much to the amazement of not only the show but of toilet paper factories across America, 20 million people that watched the Carson show that evening ran out in the morning and bought as much toilet paper as they could carry. By noon on December 20, 1973, practically every store in America was out of stock. Many of the stores tried to ration this valuable paper but they could not keep up with the demand no matter what they did.

    A few nights later, Johnny Carson explained there was no shortage and he apologized to his viewers. However, this did not help with the scare. As soon as people noticed the empty shelves, they wanted this paper even more.

    It took a total of three long and grueling weeks to get the shelves stocked again and finally the shortage was over.
    No shiit?????

  15. #15
    Member Music Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    1,243

    Default

    There was no TP to be found in Anchorage!
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

  16. #16
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    Yeah, but that is when there was still the Sears Catalog.

  17. #17
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    I tend to find stuff I like and buy a bunch of it if i find a deal. I'm not terribly worried about crisis shortages but manufacturers quit making perfectly great products all the time. Winchester Fail Safe ammo anybody?

    If I find a brand/weight/powder/whatever of bullet or cartridge a particular rifle really likes- then I'll stock up for the eventuality they'll quit making it. I could feasibly hunt for the rest of my life off my collection if I trimmed back on practice sessions somewhat but I don't stay awake at night thinking about it.

    That said- I realistically live one earthquake away from semi prolonged isolation so I tend to keep reasonable quantities of essentials on hand.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  18. #18
    Member Music Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    1,243

    Default

    Just went to the loading bench and the sticker on the CCI small rifle primers says $7/1000 and the cardboard boxed 4831 powder says $1.60 and I don't need to go to the store any time soon. So does that make me a hoarder or am I just ready or am I just slow in my reloading and need to shoot more?
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    72

    Default Some rambling thoughts on the ammo "Hoarding".

    Maybe dumb questions but is there a shelf life to properly stored ammo and powder? And what are ideal storage conditions?

  20. #20
    Member Music Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    1,243

    Default

    It's all good until it goes bad.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •