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Thread: Kenai king sampling and radio-tagging project...

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Default Kenai king sampling and radio-tagging project...

    Thought I'd share these pics to show interested folks a bit about some of the ongoing chinook research happening on the Kenai River. King salmon caught in the researchers' drift gill net are first tethered by the tail with a rope....






    Then they are placed into a restraining cradle that allows them to continue breathing in the water while the crew collects its data...








    Each fish is sampled for age, length, sex, as well as tissue for DNA analysis...




    A radio-transmitter is inserted into its stomach to track the whereabouts of the fish as it migrates up the river....





    Finally, the lasso is removed and the fish is set free...





    More details of what's actually happening step-by-step in that cradle can be found in this hi-rez ADFG video...

    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Just curious if any of you "lookers" caught any of these sampled fish with a hole punch in the tail?
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

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    Doc...thanks for the info. I also noticed the gill net marks on the head. At some point someone might catch that fish and say, "**** set netters, see what they did to that fish". This should be an eye opener to some folks that this is a very valuable research project and a couple of net marks aren't always attributed to ESSN and they aren't always a bad thing. Keep up the information flow.

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    Member ak_cowboy's Avatar
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    Thanks for the pics. How long would you say it takes for a fish to hit the net and then be released again?

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    Back in the early 90's, we were fishing the early run during a period when the ADFG had issued an emergency order mandating catch and release only. We hooked up a nice fish, and while fighting the fish, the guide hailed the research boat on the VHF. They hung back until the fish was along side the boat and the guide netted it. Once netted, the research boat pulled up along side and transfered the fish into their cradle. They took measurements and placed a transmitter right behind the dorsal fin. It was pretty cool to watch. Once the fish was released, they took down some angler info and we went on our way.

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    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    They took measurements and placed a transmitter right behind the dorsal fin.
    Transmitters are usually placed inside the body of the fish either via their mouth into the stomach or in the case of rainbow, pike, or any other non-salmon species a cut is made in the belly area and inserted into the body cavity and stitched closed. The tag they inserted in the king behind the dorsal was most likely a floy/anchor tag or a spaghetti tag, which are not transmitters.
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    One of the issues with the newer stomach transmitters (compared to the ones fixed thru-and-thru the back in the original Bendock radio-tag study) is that the fish sometimes regurgitate the transmitter.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishGod View Post
    Transmitters are usually placed inside the body of the fish either via their mouth into the stomach or in the case of rainbow, pike, or any other non-salmon species a cut is made in the belly area and inserted into the body cavity and stitched closed. The tag they inserted in the king behind the dorsal was most likely a floy/anchor tag or a spaghetti tag, which are not transmitters.
    Whatever it was, it was a little smaller than a 35mm film case. The technicians said it was a transmitter.

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    I heard a pretty disturbing rumor this past summer that the test netting project had a fairly high mortality rate associated. Does anyone have the numbers?

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    Great post, thanks for the pics and information!

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