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Thread: Goat

  1. #1
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    Default Goat

    Question for goat hunters. How does wild goat compare to domestic goat meat. I've got an awesome Mexican dish that is designed for a domestic goat. Moose and caribou are alright in it but goat is perfect, Ive not found a good place to get domestic goat and quite frankly there isn't much meat on the last one I butchered. So just wondering if wild goat was similar.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    I have eaten 2 wild goats in the past.
    1 was not so good, taken in October from the Portage area.
    2nd was excellent on opening day in Whidbey bay in August.
    Both were handled with care and taken care of all the way to the table.
    BK

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    A long time Alaskan guide once told me, after I had killed a nice goat, that the meat was good for hamburg and stew meat. I did not believe him and took care to butcher the goat into steaks,roasts,chops,etc. as I would have with a deer. It was real TOUGH. He was absolutely correct unless my teeth need sharpening and/or my jaw muscles are weak. Use a crock pot and it becomes quite edible. No matter how you cook it goat meat will NEVER rival moose, sheep , or deer!

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    Goat can be fairly tough but is delicious for certain preparations. The meat structure is different than venison, in that it has intramuscular fat and long large muscle fibers, this make it wonderful for slower/longer preparations. As burger it has an unmistakable and wonderful flavor profile. I love deer and eat it almost exclusively, but goat is really good as well and better for some things IMO.

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    Domestic goat and mountain goat are not very closely related.
    Mountain goats are most closely related to tahr, chamois, and the Asian serou. Mountain goat, at least the ones I've had, are flavorful but tough.
    however, the old cow moose we've been eating lately is tougher than either of our goats were.
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  6. #6

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    Ground goat meat is actually my favorite kind of burger! It takes up flavoring well, and it's own flavor makes for some very tasty meatballs, burgers, meatloaf, chili, etc. I actually like the flavor of the meat itself, but it can end up being pretty chewy. We typically keep the Backstraps and tenderloins for curry and grind the rest.

    It does have an interesting odor while cooking, but one that doesn't impact the taste of the finished product at all. If you are having company cook it before they arrive and then just keep it warm....

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    All wild animals have to work harder for their food. Which makes their meat tougher and leaner. It's best ground up for burgers or a slow cooking(my favorite chili).

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    Member pa 5-0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alottabs View Post
    He was absolutely correct unless my teeth need sharpening and/or my jaw muscles are weak.
    Freakin Classic!!!! LMFAO!!!!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by alottabs View Post
    A long time Alaskan guide once told me, after I had killed a nice goat, that the meat was good for hamburg and stew meat. I did not believe him and took care to butcher the goat into steaks,roasts,chops,etc. as I would have with a deer. It was real TOUGH. He was absolutely correct unless my teeth need sharpening and/or my jaw muscles are weak. Use a crock pot and it becomes quite edible. No matter how you cook it goat meat will NEVER rival moose, sheep , or deer!
    So true!!!!!!! Mt goat meat is good to give away to your buddies and tell them its sheep meat. Might get a few guys to second guess sheep hunting!

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    I have eaten several Alaskan goats; first a nanny, then two small billies then three big billies. All were taken care of in the same manner. The first nanny and the first big billy were taken late and the others were taken by late Sept. The young billies and nanny were very mild and not tough; we did make steaks and don't season our meat except for table salt. The first two big billies came close to being inedible. The last big billy was great table fare. It also had very good flavor and was only slightly tough.

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    Member Antleridge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Becca View Post
    Ground goat meat is actually my favorite kind of burger! It takes up flavoring well, and it's own flavor makes for some very tasty meatballs, burgers, meatloaf, chili, etc. I actually like the flavor of the meat itself, but it can end up being pretty chewy. We typically keep the Backstraps and tenderloins for curry and grind the rest.

    It does have an interesting odor while cooking, but one that doesn't impact the taste of the finished product at all. If you are having company cook it before they arrive and then just keep it warm....
    I assume you cut the ground goat with beef or pork suet?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Antleridge View Post
    I assume you cut the ground goat with beef or pork suet?
    Have done it with beef suet and without, my preference is with beef suet to between 7.5-10%...really helps the meat stick together when grilling, adds moisture to the finished product, and the majority of the fat cooks back out. Just my pref, plenty of people just do the ground meat without any added fat but at our house we like it with just a little extra fat.

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    So can't really compare tame goat to wild then from the sounds of it. Thanks for the input, just a thought about adding stuff to your meat to make it stick together say for burgers... Grated cheese anyone?

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    goat is good

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    Quote Originally Posted by sambuck12 View Post
    So can't really compare tame goat to wild then from the sounds of it. Thanks for the input, just a thought about adding stuff to your meat to make it stick together say for burgers... Grated cheese anyone?
    We like olive oil.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    We like olive oil.....

    Thats what I do with all my burger I put olive oil on the grinder tray and run every other piece or so through it on the way down the shoot. the meat makes burger patties well and no domestic animal products in my wild game. Goat is great both the 4 year old billy and the 9 year old, both shot in Oct. The 9 year old was tough however.

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    Member Antleridge's Avatar
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    Thanks, Becca and all for the tips. Hope I get to try them next year!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by alottabs View Post
    A long time Alaskan guide once told me, after I had killed a nice goat, that the meat was good for hamburg and stew meat. I did not believe him and took care to butcher the goat into steaks,roasts,chops,etc. as I would have with a deer. It was real TOUGH. He was absolutely correct unless my teeth need sharpening and/or my jaw muscles are weak. Use a crock pot and it becomes quite edible. No matter how you cook it goat meat will NEVER rival moose, sheep , or deer!
    Last year I put a goat (billy) roast and a moose (cow) roast in the same crockpot. Had my parents over for dinner, and I didn't tell anyone which was which. Everyone there preferred the goat, including me. I think goat has a great flavor, but I have only eaten goat taken earlier in the season.
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

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    Quote Originally Posted by eatwildgame View Post
    Thats what I do with all my burger I put olive oil on the grinder tray and run every other piece or so through it on the way down the shoot. the meat makes burger patties well and no domestic animal products in my wild game.
    Hmmmm........that's interesting that you put the olive oil in the burger as you are grinding it. We just mix it in before we cook it.

    Yes, I remember I was over some native friend's house once an I asked to use their phone so I could try and track down some suet. They asked me if there was some major reason I wanted suet for my moose burger......meaning for flavor, for a binder....what? I told them mainly just to hold the burger together. The gal had just been through a bout of cancer and was eating a lot more healthy those days. She was the one who told me about the olive oil instead of suet. My wife and I looked at each other and said how it sure made sense. Kinda counter productive when you think about it.....putting domestic fat into some nice lean healthy organically grown meat. I think a lot of people do it for the flavor as well, and I can't fault them for that.

    I only remember eating goat meat one time. Yes it was tuff, but I do indeed remember how flavorful it was. I just wish I would have been able to notch my tag for one last season for one of the most coveted tags around......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member cod's Avatar
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    When I took the 10 yr old goat of mine in to Fish and Game, he commented immediately that "Thats a crockpot goat." I got home and threw the backstrap on the grill. A few minutes later I went out on the deck to check it and it was all curled up. I tried to pry it back straight and when I let go of it, it nearly jumped up off the grill. Tough isnt strong enough a word. Tasty, but more than tough. After eating what my jaw could take it went to the crock pot with the rest of the goat. Goat was great in the crock pot, tho.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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