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Thread: Did I bake my brass too long..did I ruin it...?

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    Default Did I bake my brass too long..did I ruin it...?

    I washed a bunch of dusty (media) brass and stuck in the oven at 350 degrees to rid the water......and forgot it til an hour passed by...it now looks almost gold color...hey but it sure is clean...did I screw up 250 brass that I spend 3 hours prepping?

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Default Did I bake my brass too long..did I ruin it...?

    You don't need a ten that high. Just 150 will warm it enough to get the water off/out.

    I would think its alright. Unless you get it glowing hot it shouldn't change it's structure.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    I agree with Ray. 600 degrees for an hour would have ruined them, but 350 should be ok. Not something you want to make a habit of though. A 100 degree oven for 20 or 30 minutes should be more than enough time to get them dry.
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    The lowest setting on any stove I have ever seen is 170 degrees. I preheat mine and then turn it off and stick the brass in there on a flat sheet and leave it over night if possible. Works good and I have never had any issues with it.
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    If you want to bypass the oven, rubbing alcohol is cheap and does wonders for removing water while itself evaporating quickly.

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Temp wise itís fine, takes over 600*f to change it But, if it was baked in something other than the air (media) there is the possibility it was cased. In other words a thin surface layer could have been chemically altered by taking carbon or something leaching from the media into the brass. Itís not likely but possible, wonít know till ya try some and see how it does.
     
    I just stand mine up-side down in loading blocks or something to dry when I get them wet.
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    I like to baby my brass, so I go to Bed Bath and Beyond and buy an Egyptian Cotton Bath towel, then slice it into 2x2 mm squares, which individual squares I then use with a tweezer to individually dry each case.

    Then I apply powder.

    Ya should have seen SWMBOs face when I asked her to fold towels.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    I just stand mine up-side down in loading blocks or something to dry when I get them wet.
    I did that to some brass and it resulted in fuzzy brass (oxidized) at the lowest point of the brass. Green/blue stuff growing. Had to re-clean the whole batch. I leave them in the oven longer to dry now. 20-30 min at 170 deg. does good. Maybe roll them around once in the middle of the drying.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildalaska View Post
    I like to baby my brass, so I go to Bed Bath and Beyond and buy an Egyptian Cotton Bath towel, then slice it into 2x2 mm squares, which individual squares I then use with a tweezer to individually dry each case.

    Then I apply powder.

    Ya should have seen SWMBOs face when I asked her to fold towels.
    Ya Ken I'm OCD too but in my case it's heavily tempered by lazy . . . So I just compulsively obsess "about" doing that stuff.


    Oh and Bed Bath and Beyond is what I call her linen closet . . . I've learned the hard way to burn the evidence rather than tossing them in the hamper for her to find on wash day.
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    Add some whipped chocolate frosting to them and you have some good eating...

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daved View Post
    I did that to some brass and it resulted in fuzzy brass (oxidized) at the lowest point of the brass. Green/blue stuff growing. Had to re-clean the whole batch. I leave them in the oven longer to dry now. 20-30 min at 170 deg. does good. Maybe roll them around once in the middle of the drying.
    Needs to be something that drains so they arenít standing in water, especially if itís chlorinated water. My loading blocks are drilled through so they drain but I also have a bunch of old plastic inserts from the 70s 38 and 45 ammo boxes that work great, they have a plastic ďXď over one end of the holes.
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    What's the benefit of cleaning your brass? Assuming we're dealing with normal fired brass, not something that's badly corroded.

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    it's just a personal thing...it looks new and purdy..I like it

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    What's the benefit of cleaning your brass? Assuming we're dealing with normal fired brass, not something that's badly corroded.
    Itís a lot better for your tooling. Some debris on there can kill a die in one stroke, general gunk reduces their life over many strokes, clean lubed brass is hard to stick in the die and so on.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    Needs to be something that drains so they arenít standing in water, especially if itís chlorinated water. My loading blocks are drilled through so they drain but I also have a bunch of old plastic inserts from the 70s 38 and 45 ammo boxes that work great, they have a plastic ďXď over one end of the holes.
    I do the same thing to dry brass that I wash.

    I did pretty much the same thing the OP mentioned, one time ago, and the was discolored.

    BUT, it cleaned up again, and all was well.

    Well, there was a few cracks but I put a strip of electrical tape on those, and went ahead on with my sordid life.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    What's the benefit of cleaning your brass? Assuming we're dealing with normal fired brass, not something that's badly corroded.
    Ever hear the phrase that a clean car is so much faster? Same with clean brass...

    Like andy stated, it will clean the crap that will ruin your dies. If I am going to put my handy work into my loads I want them to look pretty too.
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    If your brass isn't gritty, it's no trick to clean it. Just wipe it off with a cloth. And brush the inside of the necks.

    It won't ruin any dies or chambers. Not IME, and I've shot a lotta brass that wasn't POLISHED, but it was clean enough.

    I've always had reservations about what might be called TOO SHINY brass. Thinking that it may not stick to the sides of the chamber, like it should, but no-one else has supported that idee, that I know of.

    I probably got the thought because of warnings against lube left on the brass. I always wipe it off, even inside the necks. Sometimes, I've washed brass for large batches, as an easy way to just to get the lube off.

    Recently, I've gone to shinin it up to make it look better. Even got a TUMBLER after all these years. I've yet to justify it though.

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    My son tumbles his brass, but being that I shoot probably an average of 50 rounds when I go to the range, I clean my brass a little differently:

    - Agitate in solution of Birchwood-Casey case cleaner and hot water for a few minutes
    - Place on foil, and lay on hot wood stove to dry off
    - Use fine steel wool to polish up
    - Agitate in container of rubbing alcohol
    - Air dry
    - Decap and procede as usual.

    No tumbling involved!

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