Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Not All New Stuff Is Good Stuff...

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    2,145

    Default Not All New Stuff Is Good Stuff...

    I am making up loads of three rounds each using H-414 and H-4831SC for my .375 Weatherby. I didn't want to use my electronic powder dispensor as cleaning it up for the two powders would be tedious. So I took out a very popular orange plastic scale I bought a few years ago, set it up, balanced it then went to check it with my check weights. It keeps reading different for different check weights and placing the 10 grain weight got two different readings. Time to throw this scale out. And the dang thing is new too. (:

    I am using a Redding 325 grain scale made sometime in the '50's. It is spot on after I balanced it and checked the repeatability with my check weights. Only problem is the thing takes forever to settle. I can live with that for this run. But now I see why the manufacturers went to magnetic dampening. I tried a couple drops of oil on this Redding, doesn't help. At least I know that 76 grains weighed out is really 76 grains.

    The old stuff still works perfectly. Now I wonder how much the thing will be off once I pretty up the balance beam with some Brasso?
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,802

    Default

    Interesting.
    I used my Redding balance scale until recently, when I got a couple of little bitty portable lectronic scales.

    Mine is an old one I got in the 60s. The thing is, it's OIL dampened. Maybe yours is TOO. It would be Very SLOW without the oil, although it would work.

    Never tried a magnetic damped one, but I don't think they are as accurate.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    The magnetic ones are as accurate as any of the rest. It only dampens when the beam is moving and the slower it moves the less dampening. The oil dampened ones work about the same. If you are getting different readings with the same weight, be sure to clean the pivot point very carefully. It only takes a little dust there to give false readings.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    2,145

    Default

    Wish I could get my hands on an oil-dampened Redding.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default eddy current..

    The so-called magnetic dampened ones are the way to go. Although they actually use magnetics,the dampening depends on the eddy currents induced in the copper vane and depends totally on speed as you correctly note. At rest, there is no effect on the beam at all, so they can be correctly zeroed. Not so on an oil dampened scale, a small bubble, a piece of lint, or something on the vane can throw the beam off.

    My electronic scale, by one of the big name guys, actually drifts a bit if is on a while. No reason why an electronic scale can't be much more accurate than a mechanical one, but I don't think they put the quality of electical components in them that they really need.

    One big advantage of electonic scales though - a user is much less likely to screw up and set the scale wrong by mis-counting the notches on the beam when setting the weights -37.2 grains is gonna be 37.2 on an electronic scale, not 32.3 or 42.4. I set my powder measure by my mechanical Ohaus scale, and then double check on my electrical one.


    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    The magnetic ones are as accurate as any of the rest. It only dampens when the beam is moving and the slower it moves the less dampening. The oil dampened ones work about the same. If you are getting different readings with the same weight, be sure to clean the pivot point very carefully. It only takes a little dust there to give false readings.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,802

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nitroman View Post
    Wish I could get my hands on an oil-dampened Redding.
    I'm pretty sure I've seen'em at gun shows. Mine is sensitive enough to notice 1 granule of H4831. And I can use it fast, but it's nowhere near as fast as an electronic.

    I'll never part with mine, but I may never use it again.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •