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Thread: Whisker biscuit VS. Drop-Away

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    Member shimano 33's Avatar
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    Default Whisker biscuit VS. Drop-Away

    I am currently shooting a QAD dropaway but am curious to what others are using.. Which do you prefer and why?

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I have a QAD and there is no reason to even consider a whisker biscuit other than price. Whisker Biscuits are hard on fletchings and since QADs hold the shaft in place, no need to look else where. Drop aways are really easy to tune and the only draw back was the shafts falling off the rest, with the QAD system, you have the best of both.
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    Member shimano 33's Avatar
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    So I'm guessing drop aways are unaffected by freezing temps?

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    Member ekberger's Avatar
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    I have QAD rests on 3 of my compound bows and have never had a problem with any of them. There is a specific label on the side of the rest where it pivots that states "do not oil". I'm certain that this caution is directed to those who might think they need to use oil for lubrication purposes and we all know how most oils become thick and vicious in cold weather. I have hunted with my bows in some pretty cold weather in a number of locations and like I said, I have never had a problem with the rest not functioning as it should with freezing temps.

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    Member agoyne's Avatar
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    I've been hunting with whisker biscuits for years and have had great success. I've never had any problems with fletchings or anything else for that matter. I am so rough on stuff, I try to have as few moving parts as possible on ANYTHING. IMHO, moving parts equals more problems in the field. I like to keep it simple.

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    The Whisker biscuit is hard onfletching as stated and tend to have problems with broad heads. I never could get the arrow to fly true witha Whisker biscuit. Iwent to QAD and have not looked back.

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    Member agoyne's Avatar
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    Blazer vanes go best with the whisker biscuit because 4 inch vanes cause too much friction and that's where the possibility of fletching damage comes in. Everybody has there own opinions, that's why they make different kinds. I've had good luck, obviously others haven't.

  8. #8
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    IMHO, the less contact with the arrow after the release/fingers let go of the string, the better. I use the Drop Zone and love it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shimano 33 View Post
    I am currently shooting a QAD dropaway but am curious to what others are using.. Which do you prefer and why?
    I use a .012 blade most of the time depending on the weight of my arrows. Target rest just because that is what I am used to... may not be the best and dont reccommend them but works great for me.. Whiskers are great and so are drop aways. There is always the "mine is better" but truth is they all work well when tuned properly. I have shot x's at 40 yards with a whisker when testing them and also used to use a spigarelli drop away with x10 arrows for distance shoots.. Again the key is TUNING your arrow/bow.. If your arrow is coming off the bow wildly you will have issues.. With a drop away there is still a chance of the rest affecting the shot.. There are many cases where they are installed wrong.. They drop too soon and bounch bak up.. That is why in target we use certain sized blades as they spring down about 2/3 of a shaft and dont bounce up till the fletchings pass.. The best way even with drop aways is to spray your arroe with athletes foot powder(the can stuff that formas a powder) then shoot. You should be able to see the blade ot rest marks on part of the shaft.

  10. #10
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Pearls from the past...

    Good information/discussion in two old threads - and generally agreed with agoyne's posts above on WBs (below).
    A few posters had tried both types (retention vs dropaways). AKDoug made some informative comments based on his experience with both, including some personal testing. Good discussion in both threads:

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ight=drop-away
    Post #9: "I have made a drop-away fail and a WB fail..."


    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...Fall-Away-rest
    Post #7: "If it gets wet, everything else will be wet and frozen too. Your cables, your arrows, your cams, your limbs etc... all of which effect the arrow flight every bit as much as a frozen bisquit. Read about Tony Russ' story about how he drew a frozen bow on a sheep hunt and the cables came off the cams.

    I once did a test. I soaked the rests on two of my bows, one with a Whisker Bisquit, the other with a drop-away and stuck them outside at -20F. I then went out and shot them both without touching a thing. The WB only missed at 20 yards by 3". The drop away failed to drop, it crunch it's way into the upward position..but that was it..and the miss was over 10".

    I'm a big proponent of shooting what you are comfortable with. I happen to shoot a WB, but I'd never tell anyone to get rid of their drop-away to get one. I just hate the "freezing" up wive's tale".

    Good luck.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Whisker biscuit VS. Drop-Away

    I bought a z7 magnum in March. Of 2010. I didn't get that bow tuned correctly until April of 2011! The moment I pulled the drop away off I fell in love with the bow! Now I know Mathews can be a b#*&% to tune, but that was ridiculous! I tried 3 different drop-away rests with no luck. Until now I've used drop-away rests with great success.
    I now shoot a NAP 360 and love it! I can't help but think the less moving parts, the better off you are in the field! I would think that would be especially true in the harsh environment of Alaska!

    Sent from my SCH-I500 using Tapatalk 2

  12. #12
    Member ekberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    I use a .012 blade most of the time depending on the weight of my arrows. Target rest just because that is what I am used to... may not be the best and dont reccommend them but works great for me.. Whiskers are great and so are drop aways. There is always the "mine is better" but truth is they all work well when tuned properly. I have shot x's at 40 yards with a whisker when testing them and also used to use a spigarelli drop away with x10 arrows for distance shoots.. Again the key is TUNING your arrow/bow.. If your arrow is coming off the bow wildly you will have issues.. With a drop away there is still a chance of the rest affecting the shot.. There are many cases where they are installed wrong.. They drop too soon and bounch bak up.. That is why in target we use certain sized blades as they spring down about 2/3 of a shaft and dont bounce up till the fletchings pass.. The best way even with drop aways is to spray your arroe with athletes foot powder(the can stuff that formas a powder) then shoot. You should be able to see the blade ot rest marks on part of the shaft.
    This is well written and great advice. I also like the comments posted by 6XLeech about testing previously frozen rests.

    There are many great rests out there to choose from. To often we blame one piece of equipment, say for example the rest, as the cause of all our problems. I too try real hard not get into the "mine is better" argument. It's what works for you and yes, tuning is key, however, I do like it when people post sound advice on how they tested a particular piece of equipment or what really matters. Just because I have 3 QAD rests doesn't necessarily make them the best thing out there, they just work well for me.


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    Member shimano 33's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the responses. I think I will just stick with the QAD for now. But I will say that my QAD is not even 6 months old but it has failed to fall about a handfull of times while shooting indoors. It really didnt change my point of intact tho for whatever reason..

  14. #14
    Member ekberger's Avatar
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    I'd say that if your "QAD has failed to fall", something is wrong with it or its set-up and I would have something done about it because that's unacceptable. If your local archery shop won't take care of this for you for whatever reason then I'd take it up with the manufacturer. The latter may have some hints for you to either rectify the problem or replace it. There is no way that I would continue to use a quality rest like this if there were some problems with it. Sometimes this stuff just happens but there is a solution even if it's a hassle to sort it out.

  15. #15
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    WB for me. The fewer moving parts the better when hunting, IMHO. I have been hunting with one consistently since 2005. Catch a lot of flack for having training wheels but the meat pole doesn't lie.

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