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Thread: NON remote living

  1. #1
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    Default NON remote living

    After many many hours of reading thousands of posts here I need to ask a question. I have read several examples of how expensive it is to live in the bush and I buy into the realities of those expenses. My questions is: How many people live on the road system yet choose to live in a dry cabin or use off the grid options? Trust me I know of the expenses for some of the off grid systems but I also know the quotes to pull utilities into my land. Other than the human weakness to run into town far to often I wonder how the "foot in both worlds" type of situation would work. I have access to plenty of good quality wood to burn for heating with wood. I have a good bid for a well and I am familiar with spending time for a few weeks at a time in an off the grid cabin.

    Please throw out consideration for things I am not thinking of with this situation.

  2. #2

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    Having homesteaded up the Windy Creek, in the Clearwater Control Area in the early 70's. Having lived on Lake Clark for several years in the mid 80's. Having owned a lodge in King Salmon, Alaska for years. I am glad that I did it, because it was important to me at the time. But I like where I live now the best. I can go weeks or months with no face to face human contact if I choose, I go to town every 6 or 8 weeks for supplies. Yes, rural (Up a logging road) but with 200 AMP service is the best of both worlds, in my opinion.

  3. #3

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    Heating with wood is great, but having the option of stove oil delivery really adds to the security and quality of life.

  4. #4
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    There are a ton of people who live on the fringes of the road system where power and phone have not reached yet. It is the best of both worlds in alot of ways. Access to the road system means potentially easy access to a JOB! Not having power or gas limits the number of people who are willing to live near you (not to mention having to commute to a JOB!)

    Now that I have kids, it is even more important to me to allow them access to schools, sports, social stuff, etc. Living on the fringes allows you to give your kids a rural upbringing with enough civilization thrown in to give them a balanced view of the world.

    As far as costs go, I honestly think I could live cheaper off the road system. I probably wouldnt have a steady job with income, so I'd have alot more time to make due with repairing old junk or doing without. I all has to due with what you are willing to live without. Power? Store bought food? Furniture? Engines?

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    Thanks for the input All is along the lines of my thoughts.

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    Member pacific23's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    There are a ton of people who live on the fringes of the road system where power and phone have not reached yet. It is the best of both worlds in alot of ways. Access to the road system means potentially easy access to a JOB! Not having power or gas limits the number of people who are willing to live near you (not to mention having to commute to a JOB!)

    Now that I have kids, it is even more important to me to allow them access to schools, sports, social stuff, etc. Living on the fringes allows you to give your kids a rural upbringing with enough civilization thrown in to give them a balanced view of the world.

    As far as costs go, I honestly think I could live cheaper off the road system. I probably wouldnt have a steady job with income, so I'd have alot more time to make due with repairing old junk or doing without. I all has to due with what you are willing to live without. Power? Store bought food? Furniture? Engines?
    You better sugar coat it better than that post, that post sounds like most of Texas, no power, bush, travel to work and school and we have enough yankees here already.

  7. #7
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    When I lived off the grid (up til last summer), it cost about $100/month for propane (cooking, fridge, lights), and $100/month for fuel for the generator and chainsaw. $400 or so a month for groceries, same for transportation (fuel, insurance, maintenance). $1000 a month,family of four, that's it. Probably could've trimmed a lot of fat even off that budget.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    cdubbin thanks for the numbers, that gives me a good example.

  9. #9
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Just for comparison, I think cdubbin lives in the southern Kenai, we live in the Mat-Su valley. I would say our monthly costs for those same things are:

    Propane: 160$/month (2x 100lb at 3.50/gal) -winter

    Gas: 100$/month generator (winter) plus snomachines, chainsaws, boat, etc.

    Food: 5-600$/month for a family of 5 and we dont buy any store meat.

    Transportation: 400$/month for fuel alone (100 mile commute)

    So that would be 1200-1400$ roughly per month. Of course there is always health insurance, car payments, dog food, rifles, etc, etc, ad nauseum...

  10. #10
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    My place is in central KP so both numbers help. Never a shortage of the etc. etc. etc. expenses, that's for sure.

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