Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Freezing eggs, what's best?

  1. #1
    Member Col. F Rodder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    295

    Default Freezing eggs, what's best?

    When freezing eggs for a later date, is it better to cure 1st or after they have been thawed? Was planning on vac packing for the following year when returning.
    Would ziploc be better not to crush, but did not think they would handle the freezer well over a years time. Just need a few to get started before I got a hen.

  2. #2
    Member Goon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Seattle/Anchorage
    Posts
    107

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Col. F Rodder View Post
    When freezing eggs for a later date, is it better to cure 1st or after they have been thawed? Was planning on vac packing for the following year when returning.
    Would ziploc be better not to crush, but did not think they would handle the freezer well over a years time. Just need a few to get started before I got a hen.
    I am not an expert, but I would think afterwards so that they could absorb the cure - then refreeze.

  3. #3
    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,366

    Default

    You can vacuum pack, just don't let it suck all of the air out, just make it where the bag is just about to crush them and then seal at that point. I would cure first cause frozen eggs do get kind of mushy, curing tightens and dries them up some, where you can still fish with them once out of the freezer again. I'm sure someone else will chime in on maybe a better way but good luck.
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

  4. #4
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Yellowknife, NWT
    Posts
    3,318

    Default

    I've always cured first.
    Then I leave the eggs on a piece of wax paper on a cookie sheet in the freezer to partially freeze.
    Then vaccume pack. The partial freeze does two things first it keeps you from crushing eggs when you vac pack and second keeps you from sucking egg juice into your packer and also keeps from getting a poor seal due to contamination.

  5. #5
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    Cure first........if you freeze first the eggs will pop.......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    867

    Default

    Why freeze? I cured some eggs (after I froze to get home from Bristol Bay) then put in a canning jar with a fresh lid and lite a piece of paper, dropped it in the jar and closed the lid tight. This took all the air out and I have used these eggs for a couple years now ice fishing. I just burn paper in the jar at the end of the fishing season to wait for next ice fishing season. Just some thought to save freezer space and keep it from stinking up the freezer. Experiential knowledge happening here... Just another avenue for you.

    George

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,956

    Default

    Cure first. I freeze them in tupperware type containers so not to crush them. They have lasted at least two years as of now, although the amount keeps getting smaller, then grows again as the season goes on.. The jar and burning paper idea is interesting.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    soldotna
    Posts
    527

    Default

    What I have done the last few years is a hybrid of the methods listed above... I always cure my eggs first, strain & dry them really well, then put them in canning jars. If you pack them in there and fill the jar to the very top there will be almost no oxygen left in the jar, essentially vac-packing them. If you don't have enough eggs to fill the jar, then do the lighted paper trick that George recommended to remove the oxygen from the space in the jar, then freeze.
    The one thing I find when thawing frozen eggs in the spring is that they turn out really wet & juicy.... this is why I try to dry them really well before jarring, and I often set them out to dry a bit more after thawing if needed.
    I have also noticed that certain cures work much better than others when freezing eggs.
    Maybe experiment with a few different methods and report back which you liked best
    www.akfishology.com

    fishing isn't about life or death... it's more important than that.

  9. #9
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Aberdeen WA
    Posts
    4,516

    Default

    I would caution AGAINST filling to the top... esp w/ quart jars. I've had the contents expand and CRACK the jars. Quarts are more susceptible than pints.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    A-town
    Posts
    153

    Default

    I like to cut to size, cure, bag @ about a lb a piece, add a little bit of the secret spices then freeze. Having pre-cut pieces is much easier to work with and seems to cure faster, more evenly and w/ less cure concoction.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •