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Thread: Hiking poles

  1. #1
    Member ozhunter's Avatar
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    Default Hiking poles

    What is the general opinion of using a hiking pole when hunting. Are they helpful or a pain the rear?

    I found one in a gun shop here that has a shooting rest on top (similar to shooting sticks in Africa)

  2. #2
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    Default Must Have.

    There a must have, most packs have places that you can strap them to if you don''t want them in your hands. I can't tell you how many times they kept me from falling! They help at water crossings, indispensable on rime ice, help you keep your balance with heavy loads, and can even be used as shooting sticks with heavy rubber bands! They can be adjusted at diffrent heights as you assend, desend, used for tent, tarp supports. Oh spend the extra money and get the three section models, they pack much easyer! Bill
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

  3. #3
    Member ozhunter's Avatar
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    Default

    It appears one could be a good investment.

    I used a thick stick in the New Zealand Alps and I found it got in the road a bit. I spose they would take some getting used to

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    Default Another Yes Vote

    I too am a fan of both hiking staffs and trekking poles, but am not yet sure which I prefer. Either one is great for maintaining balance on off-trail excursions on slopes and both have also proven useful around camp and as a rifle rest. I did snap a carbon fiber trekking pole not but one mile into a backpacking trip, but I am still a fan of the carbon fiber due to is light weight and lack of “metallic” sound when it strikes rocks or hard terrain.

  5. #5
    Member ozhunter's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn Wx View Post
    but I am still a fan of the carbon fiber due to is light weight and lack of “metallic” sound when it strikes rocks or hard terrain.
    Thats a handy tip will add that to the required list

    Thanks

  6. #6
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    Default

    As a bigger guy (215 lbs.) and carrying heavy loads, I've snapped more than a couple trekking poles when using it to catch my balance. I've gone to beefier hiking staffs and haven't looked back. The lighter weight trekking poles were nice but when you bend or break one they don't do much good.

  7. #7
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    Default

    Some guys like to use two trekking poles at the same time. I thought I'd like that since I'm a down hill skier. It turns out that for me two poles are too much and get in the way. I like using one, it turns you into a three legged critter. The next one I get though will have a horizontal handle like a cane or an ice axe design.

  8. #8

    Default contacts

    Four contacts to the ground with a heavy load are better than two. Another Yes Vote.

  9. #9

    Default Ice Axe/Trekking Pole

    I switched from a trekking pole to the ice axe/trekking pole that Barney's sells. It took some getting used to but I really like it. I wouln't go into the mountains hunting without some sort of pole.

  10. #10
    Member ozhunter's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kay9Cop View Post
    As a bigger guy (215 lbs.) and carrying heavy loads.
    Thats a good point, I'm weigh about 245 and stand 6f oot five, thats a fair bit of stress on a skinny little pole

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfoot View Post
    I switched from a trekking pole to the ice axe/trekking pole that Barney's sells. It took some getting used to but I really like it. I wouln't go into the mountains hunting without some sort of pole.
    Petzl Snowscopoic

    Yup. That's looks like the ticket right there. You can grip it from the top like a cane or ice axe, use it as a trekking pole, a gun rest or most importantly you can use to self arrest if you take nasty fall. A great piece of equipment for just under a pound.

  12. #12
    Member aufevermike's Avatar
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    Default Hike & Hunt

    Take a good look at the Stoney point Polecat hike & Hunt combo. I love mine....... and customer service can't be beat!!!!!!!

  13. #13
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    Default

    I went through three Stone Point poles before I switch brands. Work just fine until I had to put all of my weight on it to keep from falling over. The bottom third of the pole collapsed on all three.

    Now, I use a Tracks Fieldstaff two piece but they are discontinued.

  14. #14

    Default

    A hiking pole is useful for me, as it can both support your weight (good for makeshift shelter too) and protect you from small animals.


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  15. #15
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    personally don't see much use for them except on the mountains or tundra except fending off squirells and other vicious small animals. Would be a must have on a sheep hunt, spring Brown Bear or some bou areas.

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