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Thread: Insulation ideas

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    Default Insulation ideas

    Looking for insulation ideas. 2x6 construction about 1000 SqFt of wall space and 600 Sq Ft for the lid. I was looking in home depot and noticed on there "Attic-Cat" blown in fiberglass insulation it has a data column for "Walls" I can't find any information or instructions on how it is done but.

    Looks like I can do a "Blown in Blanket" approach. I put up the vapor barrier and then blow in the insulation using a little slit in the vapor barrier.

    Has anyone done anything like this? Would I be better just getting batts or another means of insulation?

    Thanks again!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Insulation ideas

    Not real sure how they do it there but here in ohio blown insulation is put in by drilling from the outside and blowing it is... it you already have the walls opened up why not use bats?

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Javaboy View Post
    Looking for insulation ideas. 2x6 construction about 1000 SqFt of wall space and 600 Sq Ft for the lid. I was looking in home depot and noticed on there "Attic-Cat" blown in fiberglass insulation it has a data column for "Walls" I can't find any information or instructions on how it is done but.

    Looks like I can do a "Blown in Blanket" approach. I put up the vapor barrier and then blow in the insulation using a little slit in the vapor barrier.

    Has anyone done anything like this? Would I be better just getting batts or another means of insulation?

    Thanks again!
    It's done before you install vapour barrier, but you have the general idea right. A spun polyester fabric is stapled tightly to the studs to contain the insulation, which is then blown in through a slit near the top. Vapour barrier is installed over the top of this.

    The advantage of blown in vs. batts is that you fill all the little nooks and crannies, and can achieve a higher R-value in fewer man hours than it takes to meticulously perform a quality install job with batts.
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    Do you know where I can purchase the "spun polyester fabric"? I think I might give it a try. Any tips on getting the right density? I guess I could count out the bales per wall cavity until I get a feel for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Javaboy View Post
    Do you know where I can purchase the "spun polyester fabric"? I think I might give it a try. Any tips on getting the right density? I guess I could count out the bales per wall cavity until I get a feel for it.
    Have built several places entirely myself, but the one time I used blown in insulation I had it done by a contractor. They supplied all materials, so I can't answer that one, sorry. Attention to proper density is important though, because you don't want settling to occur over time...
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    I'd probably just go with bats for the walls, but other than spray foam urethane, it's hard to beat blown in cellulose in the ceiling.

    But if you really want to get some good insulation and really firm up a structure as well, spray foam urethane is the way to go. The new stuff they have out now you don't have to use a vapor barrier with it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    It's done before you install vapour barrier, but you have the general idea right. A spun polyester fabric is stapled tightly to the studs to contain the insulation, which is then blown in through a slit near the top. Vapour barrier is installed over the top of this.

    The advantage of blown in vs. batts is that you fill all the little nooks and crannies, and can achieve a higher R-value in fewer man hours than it takes to meticulously perform a quality install job with batts.

    exactly what iofthetaiga said... I would NOT reccomend this as a DIY'er.. its a specialized skill and if not done right you insulation will not do the job properly or you risk not enough and have it settle creating deadspots in the wall which can turn into moisture problems and or mold problems... Like 4mer said the best of the best is spray but do NOT use vapor barrier with it or you will have moisture issues...again not a DIY project...

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    i would recommend R-21 batts in the walls and insulate the ceiling the best you absolutley can thats most likely where you will lose heat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by akriverunner View Post
    i would recommend R-21 batts in the walls and insulate the ceiling the best you absolutley can thats most likely where you will lose heat.
    I built a home and used reinforced poly stapled (lots of staples) over the stud walls and blew cellulose in the wall cavity. Make a slit to stick the hose in and another to let the air out, blow it as tight as possible. I then pushed the slight bulging Visqueen inwards and then installed 5/8" rock over it(24" o.c. Studs). Remember to tuck-tape your cuts for the vapor barrier to be effective.

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    I would urge caution when compressing insulation. Insulation r value is base upon its loft and loses r value when compressed

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    if you are not remote and can spend the bucks have it spray foamed, probably the best route you could take. if not i would surely concentrate on filling wall cavities fully and get a good r-value in the ceiling.

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    Non compressed batt insulation for walls, perhaps spray foam around receptacle boxes. Blow-in works well in ceilings where there are a lot of irregularities in joist space, trusses, etc. and used to fill voids after batts are installed over majority of ceiling.

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    Last time I used blown in insulation for the walls it setteled and left cold spots at the top of each chamber. I'd use batts or foam in the walls.
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    Spray foam!! Polyurethane like Tiger Foam or whatever's available near your area. I tried to save money with batts before, not worth it. So much better to have top quality insulation. Saves you cutting/splitting/hauling wood, money for propane, much more comfortable inside. I'd also add some thin board insulation on the outside to avoid the thermal bridging from studs. I HATE it when I see no frost over the studs because it means my heat is getting out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowrider View Post
    Last time I used blown in insulation for the walls it setteled and left cold spots at the top of each chamber. I'd use batts or foam in the walls.
    Blown-in insulation can settle if the density isn't correct when installed. Blown-in and batts will both slump if they become saturated by moisture due to poor vapor barrier installation. Spray poly foam will absorb moisture and cause mold and rot if vapor barrier is not correctly installed. The same is true of polystyrene board. In our climate (Alaska), proper vapor barrier installation is critical, regardless of what insulation type you choose.
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