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Thread: .375 300gr Accubond

  1. #1
    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Default .375 300gr Accubond

    Has anyone tested the 300gr Accubond yet

    There's a box sitting on my shelf and it's starting to wink at me. Last year I decided the 375 Ruger was plenty happy with 300gr TSX's so I put her away.

    Now that I'm getting bored I was thinking about working up a load after the holidays.

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    I just grabbed five 300gr Accubond's and five 300gr TSX's out of a box randomly and the average lengths are:

    Accubond 1.517" OAL
    TSX 1.492" OAL

    At first this seems odd because the TSX's are generally long for weight due to their lack of lead construction. In this case the Accubond is longer due to it's boat tail and longer slippery nose design.

    The base to ogive measurement on the Accubond is .060 less than the TSX. 0.847 versus 0.907

    At first glance it appears that I will not be compressed when using the same charge that I use with the TSX. This assumes the Accubond can handle that charge, testing will be the determing factor. The TSX has a long jump of .125 with my load so there is no chance the Accubond will be jammed into the lands with the same charge. Regaurdless, I will work up slow and plot the velocity versus charge curve as I proceed.

    I'm NOT considering long range shooting with this rifle or caliber but the Accubond has a far superior BC of .485 compared to .357 BC with the TSX. Assuming both bullets are loaded to 2650fps the Accubond has 1.0" less drop at 300 yards utilizing a 200 yard zero and 3.0" less wind drift assuming a 10mph cross wind.

    There is no doubt that my rifle does very well with the TSX but assuming I can get the Accubond to group well it will be inherently more accurate with the higher BC bullet.

    Brian Litz's new book describes accuracy as hitting your target versus precision which means being able to shoot small groups. Think about a guy that can shoot one hole groups but he can't hit what he's hunting. He may be precise but he isn't accurate. With less drop and drift the higher BC bullet increases the shooters accuracy. Hunting is better served by accuracy than precision, the vitals are plenty large. I'm not going to plagiarizer his book but he explains this in a very scientific and statistical format with different wind, range, velocity and atmospheric conditions.

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    I went through the same process of finding a load for the 375 Ruger. The 270g shot well at about 2600fps out of my stubby rifle. I picked up some 250 TTSX with about .1 greater BC. They shoot about 2700 fps, have about 3 inches less drift at 300 yards with a full value 10 mph wind, and hit about two inches higher at 300 yards. So, they are working the same way your accubonds are. Increased BC and increased velocity down range for greater point blank range and less critical of shooter errors at 200-300 yard ranges. Interesting debate for increase BC bullets. Most of the time BC is not much concern inside of 200 yards for folks. Out to 300 yards or more, it could be a three inch or more difference in point of impact for elevation or windage depending on bullet selection. So you might have to get a box of TTSX in 250 to wink at you when you go by them in the gun store and try them all head to head. 300 accubond, 300 TSX, 250 TTSX.

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