Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Need some ideas on anchoring large log poles.

  1. #1
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Anchorage, Trapper Creek, Seward
    Posts
    1,799

    Default Need some ideas on anchoring large log poles.

    I am considering two ideas. One is to build a large log arch over the driveway to my cabin. Ground is low and drilling a hole and putting them into the ground around 5 ft will not last that long I am afraid. I have considered buying some of the plastice foot holds that start out around 4ft in diameter and tapper down to around 18inches or smaller with rebar or steel pipe coming out of of them. then drilling log, sliding it on and then run support cable out.

    Your thoughts and ideas.

    Second is I want to add two more cabins to the propety over the next two years. My current cabin sits off the ground about 10ft due to occasional high water as this year when the creek floods..would the same thing work for a pilar foundation? It would have to be at a min 8ft off the ground before I built the platform.
    Cabin size will be 16x20 or 16x24. single story with half loft even possibly just single floor without loft. 6 or 8in D logs.

    Thanks..look forward to any ideas, pictures or links to what might work.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    540

    Default Need some ideas on anchoring large log poles.

    I think Home Depot & lowes sell the "Bigfoot" foundation footers. Another idea would be to have a well driller drill casings in for cabins foundation post also

  3. #3
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Anchorage, Trapper Creek, Seward
    Posts
    1,799

    Default

    Thanks excav..yeah my current cabin sits on 15 24in casings that were drilled 20ft into the ground. Then they ran Ibeams across and welded them. Off of this the platform was constructed. Over 16 years old and holding true with little settle if any. Most of the movements have been associated with the framing work that was done.

    I have considered it..but ultimantly the weight will not be anything near what i have suspended now. If i have to consider downsizing cabin size i might to offset the need for drilling casings.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

  4. #4

    Default

    From the sounds of it the cabin must be on the road system? If it is the two gate post get a large diameter steel casing or pipe and dig them in deep with a backhoe. That is the way they put in power poles . there is also some outfits that have auger setups for that. Then you could insert your post in the pipe.

  5. #5
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Anchorage, Trapper Creek, Seward
    Posts
    1,799

    Default

    Thanks big bend.. the problem is the logs are about 36 inches around if not more at the base, spruce so pretty much kept the diameter going up to bout 20ft. They have some very nice burls on them but still need to be treated. I only need about 15ft for elevation and will cut the 5ft off if I can secure them at ground level. if I had to trim the 5ft in so they would slip in the casing this might work.

    thinking of just building a solid foundation about 50in deep wider at bottom and tappered to the top and them reinforce with rebar and run a flagpole up about 12ft. split the log, route out the middle and put the sides together like they make pencils around thr lead...lol some concept like this, or finding a way to drill the center out about 7ft in the center and sliding it over then secure with some steel baseplates lags and cable ties to three points...I don't know...lol why I posted it. I see them all over AK and know it can be done.

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Bend View Post
    From the sounds of it the cabin must be on the road system? If it is the two gate post get a large diameter steel casing or pipe and dig them in deep with a backhoe. That is the way they put in power poles . there is also some outfits that have auger setups for that. Then you could insert your post in the pipe.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    540

    Default Need some ideas on anchoring large log poles.

    Find some scrap culvert you could dig in then fill with concrete around Might be easier than trying to core out inside of log

  7. #7
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Anchorage, Trapper Creek, Seward
    Posts
    1,799

    Default

    Thanks allot..see thats what I am talking about..great idea. I would think around 6ft would be perfect, wide enough. Question is how would i secure it to the concrete pad then..or are you considering dropping it into the middle and securing in place with concrete. I can see that working and even consider drilling some rebar through the logs at different angles and lengths allowing them to almost touch the inside of each side of the culvert.

    Great idea thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by excav8tr View Post
    Find some scrap culvert you could dig in then fill with concrete around Might be easier than trying to core out inside of log
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    540

    Default Need some ideas on anchoring large log poles.

    You could drop it in & rebar it off or scraps of metal or make a rebar base like they do with signal light poles then attach up too some how Maybe run some flatbar up vertically on 4 sides & lag them in good You should be able to find some culvert sections around some construction yards. Even the black plastic culvert will work & never rot out.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by excav8tr View Post
    You could drop it in & rebar it off or scraps of metal or make a rebar base like they do with signal light poles then attach up too some how Maybe run some flatbar up vertically on 4 sides & lag them in good You should be able to find some culvert sections around some construction yards. Even the black plastic culvert will work & never rot out.
    DO NOT allow wood to come into contact with concrete. Maybe use steel angles - - - one on each of two sides of your log "columns" and secure with two anchcor bolts into the concrete pier or pad, and two through the log column (or post). Two bolts will hold the log from moving out of plumb. A single thru-bolt through the log post will not !!! Be sure to waterproof the base of the log post.


    DIAGONAL bracing between posts is the best answer for holding them in place. My recommendation would be to use steel rods with turnbuckles. These may be drilled through the posts where necessary.

    If you believe that drilling into the logs and using inserts (rebar rods, bolts, pipes, etc.), select steel pipe columns. These should be no smaller than 3" in diameter, and 4" would be much better. You will be overcoming what is termed an "unsupported height" columns (or posts) and nothing smaller will be satisfactory in that method. Rebar is really "temperature steel" and is not really designed for shear resistance. They bend easily, as they are "soft" steel and are much too small at any rate. They are designed only to stabilize the conccrete in which they are buried.

    Preformed culvert materials, whether steel or plastic, would serve as large "Sonotubes" and would be quite satisfactory. These are simply filled with concrete, within which a number of rebars (reinforcing bars) are embedded. The bottom of these embedded bars should be bent 90-degrees and should be cut to length (they should NOT protrude above the pad or pier top) and bent at the supplier's yard before you take them to the site. Anything larger than a #4 bar will be difficult to impossible to bend on site, and you may want tu use something as large as #6 barrs. These bars are numbered in 1/8" units, so a #4 bar is 4/8" or one-half inch in diameter. Use "deformed" bars, not smooth bars. It follows that a #8 bar is one inch in diameter, and a #6 bar is 3/4" in diameter.

  10. #10
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Anchorage, Trapper Creek, Seward
    Posts
    1,799

    Default

    Makes even more sense..I am going to have a third cross member log going across them both and notched to fit like a dovetail if you will and bolted with steel plates after I bolt it from the top down into the standing post.

    Not sure I completly got ya on the diagonal idea. sounds like after I get the base dried and set. I need to secure it with two pieces of steel plates that I will assume are secured within the concrete prior to drying or bolts secured within the concrete as anchor points. obviously some prior measurements need to be made. then by using some guide wires for temp hokding it in place I should b able to plum it and secure it in place? will the idea of guide cables to permantly secure or help it stay in place play a vital role or is this overkill? I am thinking once I get both set and secure the top piece in pkace it should not sway to much...don't know.

    I plan on trying to assemble it as best I can on the ground before putting it up to make sure all pieces fit. problem I see is the cross log has a huge burl on it and even though it goes all the way around the log there is going to be a heavy side. I plan to suspend this prior and mark it as it sets showing the weight distributed. your thoughts

    thanks again for all the help

    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly 2 View Post
    DO NOT allow wood to come into contact with concrete. Maybe use steel angles - - - one on each of two sides of your log "columns" and secure with two anchcor bolts into the concrete pier or pad, and two through the log column (or post). Two bolts will hold the log from moving out of plumb. A single thru-bolt through the log post will not !!! Be sure to waterproof the base of the log post.


    DIAGONAL bracing between posts is the best answer for holding them in place. My recommendation would be to use steel rods with turnbuckles. These may be drilled through the posts where necessary.

    If you believe that drilling into the logs and using inserts (rebar rods, bolts, pipes, etc.), select steel pipe columns. These should be no smaller than 3" in diameter, and 4" would be much better. You will be overcoming what is termed an "unsupported height" columns (or posts) and nothing smaller will be satisfactory in that method. Rebar is really "temperature steel" and is not really designed for shear resistance. They bend easily, as they are "soft" steel and are much too small at any rate. They are designed only to stabilize the conccrete in which they are buried.

    Preformed culvert materials, whether steel or plastic, would serve as large "Sonotubes" and would be quite satisfactory. These are simply filled with concrete, within which a number of rebars (reinforcing bars) are embedded. The bottom of these embedded bars should be bent 90-degrees and should be cut to length (they should NOT protrude above the pad or pier top) and bent at the supplier's yard before you take them to the site. Anything larger than a #4 bar will be difficult to impossible to bend on site, and you may want tu use something as large as #6 barrs. These bars are numbered in 1/8" units, so a #4 bar is 4/8" or one-half inch in diameter. Use "deformed" bars, not smooth bars. It follows that a #8 bar is one inch in diameter, and a #6 bar is 3/4" in diameter.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

  11. #11
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Anchorage, Trapper Creek, Seward
    Posts
    1,799

    Default

    Just had another great idea that popped up. will this work

    If I set the culvert, filled with rebard and concret, then had someone design me a circular or octogon style brace that had legs extended into the concrete say 24inches, this woudl secure it in place. Make it so it is flush and level and about 2ft high with holes predrilled to secure to the log with lag bolts at different levels. All I would have to do is maybe increase the hight of this..but the log would slide down inside this device or baseplate if you will.

    Would i have to be concerned about the end of the log touching the concrete or would i need to put a baseplate at the bottom and design a way for water and snow not to get between the two? I would think filling up the cracks with some form of silicone or tar might alleviate any penetration with water, snow or prevent ice from setting in.

    Braistorming here..
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •