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Thread: Garden 2013

  1. #1

    Default Garden 2013

    I would like some input on the MUST HAVE's in your garden space? Did you start seeds prior to planting out? What system did you use to get things going?

    Example: I pre-sprout tomato and peppers on wet paper towel wrapped in cellophane, placed on mild heat source (top of refrigerator) 8-12 weeks before last frost date (formerly Michigan-May 15). Tomato sprouts in 4-6 days and peppers follow within the next week. Then carefully placed in peat pots with cool fluorescent tubes an inch above and water from bottom only.

  2. #2
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nuskovich View Post
    I would like some input on the MUST HAVE's in your garden space? Did you start seeds prior to planting out? What system did you use to get things going?

    Example: I pre-sprout tomato and peppers on wet paper towel wrapped in cellophane, placed on mild heat source (top of refrigerator) 8-12 weeks before last frost date (formerly Michigan-May 15). Tomato sprouts in 4-6 days and peppers follow within the next week. Then carefully placed in peat pots with cool fluorescent tubes an inch above and water from bottom only.
    Nuskovich
    Any brassicas you plan to have in your garden will have to be pre-started. Or you can buy the Starts at any nursery, green house, Wallys, etc. I start my tomatoes early to mid March. Romaine lettuce about the end of March 1st of April. 1st week of April I start my Cucumbers. Wx permitting, I have planted my Onion and garlic starts the end of april, 1st of may and covered them with visqueen and they did exceptionally well. Root magets are a constant problem with onions, but I've found using nematodes reduces that problem nicely.

  3. #3
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    Default Starts

    I am starting tomatoes in February, peppers, etc., but I like really small starts for cauliflower and broccoli to be set in the garden, with those, the big starts never do as well, ever.

    As far as tomatoes; I am starting the old reliables but I am adding around 20 heirlooms to the mix for experimenting.
    I have been busting my tail-end to tailor my greenhouse environment to suit their needs. I am thinking an Alaska Tomatofest-ish type of gathering may have to take place, where everyone brings their best mater to the judges(randomly picked from a draw) for a blind taste test. 10 bucks to enter, or so, proceeds go to cancer clinics or something of like.

    Something has to be done to help people remember what a tomato really tastes like, and they are not in the stores.

  4. #4

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    Mark
    20 Heirlooms? What kind of space you have?? If there is cross pollination between varieties you get the heirloom fruit but all the seed are hybridized, right? I am not sure...squashes can mess up real bad

  5. #5
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    Default heirlooms

    An Heirloom is an open pollinated strain that existed since 1940, family Heirlooms have been passed down for generations, a created heirloom is the cross between these types of maters. You can also de-hybridize a hybrid by crossing to an heirloom which then takes years to do from there, or inbreeding a hybrid 5 or so generations, leaning towards your selected trait, via dehybridized Big Beef strain.

    This is stuff I am working on too.

    I have alot of room.

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