Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: 308 Norma Magnum

  1. #1
    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    tustumena & kasilof
    Posts
    899

    Default 308 Norma Magnum

    An old friend of the family passed away about 15 years ago and his widow eventually got to be in her eighties and ended up selling out and heading back to her family in the lower 48.

    To make a long story short we ended buying this old rifle that was her husbands from her though we really had no use for it and I finally got around to taking it out of the case and looking it over. I didn't find a manufacturers name on it and I wondered if someone could identify who made the rifle ? They lived in Alaska for about fifty years so he probably picked it up quite a while back.

    011.jpg

  2. #2
    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    tustumena & kasilof
    Posts
    899

    Default

    I flipped it over.

    014.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    tustumena & kasilof
    Posts
    899

    Default

    Okay I did a little digging on the internet and I will assume it came from a manufacturer in Denmark.

    "The .308 Norma Magnum (7.62x65mmBR) cartridge was created by Nils Kvale at Norma, Sweden. Like the larger .358 Norma Magnum it is based on the .300 H&H Magnum.[1] The length of the case is the longest that would fit in a standard Mauser action. While it appeared to have a bright future initially, it was soon superseded in popularity by the .300 Winchester Magnum. The first, and one of the few, manufacturers to offer rifles in .308 Norma Magnum was Schultz & Larsen of Denmark and they still are."

  4. #4
    Member mekaniks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Seward
    Posts
    206

    Default

    Sure looks to me like a Springfield action with a custom stock from the pics. If its stamped 308 Norma mag it may have be a 30-06 that was rechambered. That was all the rage back in the 60's

  5. #5
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,482

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mekaniks View Post
    Sure looks to me like a Springfield action with a custom stock from the pics. If its stamped 308 Norma mag it may have be a 30-06 that was rechambered. That was all the rage back in the 60's
    That's exactly what I see. It could be rechambered or it may be rebarreled, but its a Springfield '03 action (U.S. military issue) converted to sporter use.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  6. #6
    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    tustumena & kasilof
    Posts
    899

    Default

    Thanks ! I ended up pulling the scope off and took a look underneath and it says its a model 03-A3. Then I started looking for ammunition online and got the bad news. Its hard to find, but I did get half a box with the rifle. But we didn't get this to shoot its more of a momento from people that were in our past. And yes its stamped 308 Norma Mag.

  7. #7
    Member mekaniks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Seward
    Posts
    206

    Default

    Yep, it likely started out as a military 30-06 and had the bolt machined out to fit the magnum case and either had the chamber "reamed" and barrel shortened, or more likely had a "sporter" barrel installed also along with the custom stock. It's a beautiful cool old gun that someone put a lot of work in to make a sweet hunting rifle in its day. I believe the 308 Norma was the predasessor to the 300 win mag and not a lot of ballistic difference. If your inclined to and if you are a reloader you can make brass by necking down and trimming .338 win mag brass.

  8. #8

    Default

    Cases for the cartridge can be purchased from Norma or made in three ways: Necking up a 7mm Remington Magnum case, necking down a .338 Winchester Magnum case, or running .300 Winchester Magnum cases through a full-length sizing die. Since the first two options leave the brass a bit short, the third is generally considered to be the best option. The Norma was designed to operate at lower pressures than the .300 Win mag (the Norma being intended for use in surplus M-98s in the American market, and the Winchester for use in the M-70) and there is about a 200 fps difference between them, but as far as energy, velocity and trajectory are concerned the Winchester can do anything the Norma can and just a little more, accuracy on the other hand should be a toss given quality craftsmanship, and of course nothing shot with the Norma will ever think 'that wasn't a .300 Win Mag' before keeling over.

  9. #9
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    12

    Default

    I had a 308 Norma back in the 70s before I got my 300 Weatherby. I like this cartridge, it has a decent neck length & is a better designed case than the 300 Winchester which has a ridiculously short neck. Bullets protruding deep into powder space make no sense to me. The 308 Norma & 300 Winchester are ballistic twins. I used my 308 Norma on big Sambar Deer (600 lbs) using 180gr bullets. I have very fond memories of this great cartridge. Brass & cartridges are still available.

  10. #10
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Desert
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Looks like a very nice rifle. Straight out of the 60's.

  11. #11

    Default

    I'll venture that's a Fajen semi-inlet stock, also from that era. The pistol grip and cheek piece are dead ringers for several I put on rifles back then. Just let the last one go recently, or I'd share pics.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    O'Fallon, MO
    Posts
    195

    Default

    Looks a lot like an H&R California style stock from the '60s, but on the Springfield action no doubt a custom job.

    Fajen is probably right.

  13. #13
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tustumena_lake View Post
    An old friend of the family passed away about 15 years ago and his widow eventually got to be in her eighties and ended up selling out and heading back to her family in the lower 48.

    To make a long story short we ended buying this old rifle that was her husbands from her though we really had no use for it and I finally got around to taking it out of the case and looking it over. I didn't find a manufacturers name on it and I wondered if someone could identify who made the rifle ? They lived in Alaska for about fifty years so he probably picked it up quite a while back.

    011.jpg
    A beautiful rifle with a wonderful past.You are indeed a lucky man! Love that pistol grip, but, wow! Looks like the rifle was treated with kid gloves out in the field.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Veneta, OR
    Posts
    1,156

    Default

    The .308 Norma Magnum is "magical" .... It will outshoot a Weatherby with less recoil than a Win Mag, the brass lives on forever and ever and the bullet "actually" gains speed after leaving the barrel ! "MAGICAL" I'm tellin' ya ........

  15. #15

    Default

    This is weird. I have an identical gun. 03 re chambered in 308 Norma, with a fajen stock.



  16. #16
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Desert
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Back in the '60's there were several articles touting the 308 Norma and the exact conversions you see in this thread. The 300 Win Mag came out and pretty much crimped sales of the Norma, at least in this country.
    But there were many surplus Springfields to easily and cheaply convert from 30-06 to the more powerful Norma cartridge.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •