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Thread: How many?

  1. #1

    Default How many?

    200 rounds though a barrel of a ruger .357, in barrel condition/accuracy is that alot or just well broken in.

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    That's a good start before breakfast
    Not sure exactly what your question is, but unless the loads are horribly abusive the gun is good for literally hundred of thousands of rounds.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
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  3. #3

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    theres always the ? when buying or selling a firearm-how many rounds through it. i guess its kind of like mileage on a truck-100k highway miles not to bad-100k with most of it being off roading and getting stuck another story. sort of the same with a firearm i guess 300 standard factory rounds or properly loaded rounds with regulary cleanings after properly breaking it in then shouldnt be in to bad ah shape. well sending really hot loads, not cleaning and not caring for it could be a problem. i know for super high velocity rifles the barrels can be worn out faster. although for some thing like a .357 or ought 6 whats a # when you start to turn your nose, when does the value start to drop off?

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    Quote Originally Posted by verlaskan View Post
    200 rounds though a barrel of a ruger .357, in barrel condition/accuracy is that alot or just well broken in.
    That is a normal shooting session for any small caliber handgun. Ruger barrels aren't the smoothest thing in the world, it will take more than a couple hundred to break it in. You will need to clean it thoroughly to get good accuracy. After 200 rounds you will need to scrub the barrel.

    Are you having a problem with it?
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    Quote Originally Posted by verlaskan View Post
    theres always the ? when buying or selling a firearm-how many rounds through it. i guess its kind of like mileage on a truck-100k highway miles not to bad-100k with most of it being off roading and getting stuck another story. sort of the same with a firearm i guess 300 standard factory rounds or properly loaded rounds with regulary cleanings after properly breaking it in then shouldnt be in to bad ah shape. well sending really hot loads, not cleaning and not caring for it could be a problem. i know for super high velocity rifles the barrels can be worn out faster. although for some thing like a .357 or ought 6 whats a # when you start to turn your nose, when does the value start to drop off?
    Ok, are you buying? The number is not significant, the care is. My guns are shot. I don't mean shot out but I do shoot. I fired a 120 rounds of 357, and 50 rounds of 40 S&W today. Often I will shoot two hundred rounds in each of three guns in the span of a couple of hours. I have a CZ 40 that has now had 400 rounds through it and I've had it three weeks. I shot a one inch group standing, last night, at 25 yds. It is almost broken in. That barrel started out very smooth.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    "How many rounds down the tube with that?", probably the most useless gun buying question out there.
    If the gun shows even signs of wear (like the bolt, locking lugs ect.) and little abuse, then usually it doesnt matter how many rounds are down the tube with it.
    Some of the hotter rounds maybe, like the 220 swift warrant that kind of question.
    Also if you are buying a modified gun, like a 1911 that has a 460 rowland barrel on it.
    I think the first question to ask is if the previous owner handloads, then you need to determine if he is a screwball and maybe loaded too hot a rounds for it.

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    I'm a LEO and SWAT Team leader with nearly 30 years on the street. Suffice to say I have some experience with handguns, thus I share Matthew Quigley's view toward them.

    I've yet to see a revolver barrel truly "shot out", other than rarely on a competion gun owned by a rabid shooter. Back in the 80's I was involved in PPC, and we would put more rounds through our revolvers in the week leading up to a weekend match than most guys do in several years. We're talking casual practice minumum 500 a week and as much as 500 A DAY the week of a match, and I never shot out my match gun's barrel.

    Far more common is mechanical failure due to wear, often referred to as "shooting loose". This happens even with 38 Special match loads if you put enough through the gun, let alone full house 357, 44, or bigger stuff. The most common manifestation is poor cylinder timing and lockup, You'll know this is happening when the guy next to you on the range cusses you out as he picks lead shavings out of the side of his face.

    The most common causing of any handgun failure or a barrel going bad is poor maintanance, no question...

    Ruger revolvers, particularly their double actions, are the closest thing to a bullet proof revolver as you'll find. They aren't as pretty, smooth, or well finished as a S&W (or even a Taurus) but if you take care of one, it will hold up to anything you throw at it and last longer than you will...

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Like others have said, it's awfully difficult to wear out a barrel on a handgun. In general, handguns operate at fairly low chamber pressures (compared to rifles), and bullet velocities are usually less than 2000 fps. There are exceptions, of course, but typical handgun performance just doesn't cause a lot of barrel wear.

    The rifle calibers that have a reputation for quickly wearing out barrels, are usually the ones that burn lots of powder for their bore size, operate at very high chamber pressures, and as a result, have very high bullet velocites. The 7mm & 300 RUM, .220 Swift & .22-250 immediately come to mind.

    I have a couple of 1911's. One has close to 10,000 rounds though it, and the other has well over 5,000 rounds through it. The bores still look great and produce the same accuracy as when they were new.

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    I have a couple of 1911's. One has close to 10,000 rounds though it, and the other has well over 5,000 rounds through it. The bores still look great and produce the same accuracy as when they were new.

    A man after my own heart. The one handgun I truly love is the 1911 in 45ACP. The love affair started back in 1979 when I shot on the 1st MP Co Pistol Team (we won the 1st Infantry Div. Championship that year, I might add smugly...) and has been going strong since.

    My current carry gun/love is a Kimber Raptor II...

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    Gosh! Can we really shoot out a handgun barrel? I think with the auto-loaders the barrel wears out from the outside rather than the bore. I once bought an old S&W revolver 357 from a guy at a gunshow that had been shot so much the top strap was almost cut through at the cylinder gap. It shot like a dream, every round in the same hole at 25 yards.

    I have several handguns, revolvers and auto-loaders that have exceeded 10,000 rounds through each of them. They still outshoot me and I do pretty good.

    I think they will get loose in the lockup for both auto and revolver and this can affect accuracy. This seems to come more from magnum loads than standard loads, or just heavier loads. Often we can just replace parts bring back the accuracy. I want my revolvers to be tight not rattlin' loose. Some revolvers come new this loose. Also cylinder throat size variation and cylinder bore misalignment are big reasons why a revolver won't shoot well. If it's a Ruger just call them and they will send you a box and a shipping label and will restore to as new standards. I've done that about a dozen times.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  11. #11
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Default Ruger Handguns

    I agree with Murphy,

    When I was looking to buy a handgun I went to an indoor range that rents them. They had several there, but the GP-100 looked great. After shooting it, and well I might add, I asked how many rounds this gun saw.....25k rounds and still shot well. So I bought one. The only handgun I own. My uncle had a LLama once. It didn't make it past 5k before it had a frame stretch issue.

    Ron

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