Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Looking for info on Chuitna River kings

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    42

    Default Looking for info on Chuitna River kings

    I'm thinking of doing a trip over the inlet to the Chuit for kings. I'm thinking of going anytime the week of 6/20 to 6/25. I want to fly over there my self. It looks like Tyonek air strip is the closest to the river. I was wondering if anyone has done it and could tell me where the good king holes are and maybe some details as far as transportation to the river and airport parking details.

    Thanks,
    KUB AIR

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    607

    Default

    Its been a few years since I've been there. We landed in Tyonek and had to have a local "guide" pre-arranged so we could use the airstrip. He put us in the back of a pick up and drove us to where the road ended at the river. He agreed to be back in about 5 hours and left us to ourselves. We caught a few Kings, (no bait was allowed at that time so check the regs) and flew back to Nikiski. I made two trips and it was the same both times. The folks at Radeske Air in Nikiski fly there often and they seem like the kind of people who would share info about the area and how things are done these days. tight lines and good luck!!

  3. #3

    Default

    gusdogg44 is right, Tyonek is not a public airport, so just don't tool in there and land. Or you are going to be answering to the Tribal police. You need an invitation and sponsor.

    King fishing is king fishing. You got to be there when they are running. No way to be sure other than fishing alot around the suspected run. Otherwise you are just chancing that the fish are there. Runs can be short and furious with lots of fish, or more strung out with lower numbers. Like all Cook Inlet runs, you just got to put the time in, or get good intel on when the runs are coming in good.

  4. #4

    Default

    There used to be various locals who can shuttle you from nearby (Beluga airstrip) to where you can walk in on the public accesses (fish and game website has a page on this). Call Spernak (Merrill Field) for logistics.

  5. #5

    Default Chuit Guide

    I guide over there and absolutely love the Chuit. What you'll have to do is first off get to Tyonek and I would simply ask someone for a ride down to the lower road drop off, then just fish up or down depending on the tide. The Chuit is very shallow and quite narrow with deeper channels, it's an AWESOME place to catch kings, different than most places. There are some big fish over there. I had clients catch 50lbs out of there, in fact at one point I had three folks with 40 plus pounders on at the same time out of the same hole. You can also ask to be dropped off at the bridge and either work your way up or down the river. If you get off at the bridge there's an awesome hole right there, right off the bridge, then another dynamite hole several hundred yards down, if you get off the bridge and find the trailhead, it's the very next stop you'll come to off the trail, it's really hard to miss. You will have to take lots of bug dope, lots of bugs. There are cut trails that run down both sides of the river, do a little exploring and you should find your way just fine. It's good to have a contact over there.


    My avatar picture is actually myself and Karl Malone on the Chuit, always a good time over there. One of the most underrated fishing rivers on the west side.
    Marc Theiler

  6. #6

    Default Chuit River

    The Chuit does not have good access, unless you are able to get in a vehicle with a guide. The uplands on both sides are owned by Tyonek Native Corporation (TNC), except for several Native allotments and land in Section 30, T.12 N., R.10 W. on the north side of the river mouth, which is owned by either the Kenai Peninsula Borough or private parties. Last year I booked three days with the Tyonek lodge for about $500 a day. I flew over to Tyonek via Spernak Air, and was met at the airport by a local who took me several miles upriver to the lodge. We had good fishing before it rained and muddied the river. A guy who flew over in his cub was kicked off the river for tresspassing. There are a couple of guide operations that have been given access to the river by the Tyonek Corporation. Also there are helicopters dropping off anglers on gravel banks to fish, and then shuttling them away to other parts of the river. The only down side is the river does get muddy with excess run off or rain.

    Looks like the Chuit River lodge may be back in business? Contact Dennis Torrey www.chuitriverlodge.com
    Dennis is a local on the upper river, and had some problems getting access to the river for his clients. He charges $275 a day.

  7. #7

    Default Chuit River

    The Chuit does not have good access, unless you are able to get in a vehicle with a guide. The uplands on both sides are owned by Tyonek Native Corporation (TNC), except for several Native allotments and land in Section 30, T.12 N., R.10 W. on the north side of the river mouth, which is owned by either the Kenai Peninsula Borough or private parties. Last year I booked three days with the Tyonek lodge for about $500 a day. I flew over to Tyonek via Spernak Air, and was met at the airport by a local who took me several miles upriver to the lodge. We had good fishing before it rained and muddied the river. A guy who flew over in his cub was kicked off the river for tresspassing. There are a couple of guide operations that have been given access to the river by the Tyonek Corporation. Also there are helicopters dropping off anglers on gravel banks to fish, and then shuttling them away to other parts of the river. The only down side is the river does get muddy with excess run off or rain.

    Looks like the Chuit River lodge may be back in business? Contact Dennis Torrey www.chuitriverlodge.com
    Dennis is a local on the upper river, and had some problems getting access to the river for his clients. He charges $275 a day.

  8. #8

    Default

    Tyonek Corp doesn't own the river and doesn't have the authority to kick anybody out of anywhere from within the river banks. They do own bordering land. There are public accesses to the river and you can wade or walk within the riverbanks once you are there. You do not have to pay for this. See the ADFG website for info on this.

  9. #9

    Default

    FYI - there has been a dispute about this - see:

    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/akf...hing/63685.htm

    and

    http://www.sf.adfg.state.ak.us/SARR/...chuit_home.cfm

    I'm not sure what BLM's decision was - but I'm betting that the State of Alaska's opinion is no different than it was when a similar issue came up on the Arolik a few years back (i.e., the land under the entire riverbed belonged to the State and wasn't the BLM's to convey to anyone).

  10. #10

    Default Chuit River

    I am just reporting what I saw last year. There are a couple of easments to the river. Getting access to the easements is the hard part. I was able to get unlimited access by booking through the Tyonek Lodge.

  11. #11
    Member homerdave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    homer, alaska
    Posts
    3,922

    Exclamation it may not matter who controls access eventually....

    better hurry and find a way to fish it now, because if the chuitna coal project goes through they are proposing to dump up to 7 MILLION gallons of wastewater into the chuit DAILY!
    seems like the tyonek corp would be well served to invite as many folks to fish as possible, so as to broaden the number of folks in affected user groups...
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  12. #12

    Default I hope not

    I certainly hope not. There's nothing sacred anymore, let's just sell our souls for a few extra jobs and extra revenue that we'll never see.

    I would be sincerely sad if that project goes forth.
    Marc Theiler

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    42

    Default So, What we concluded....

    Let me see if I got this right. I can't fly into Tyonek b/c it native corp owned (without paying an arm and a leg for their services, like Carl Malone did). However, but I can fly into Bluega(?), right? Once I land I can pay Joe Schmow, $20 round trip to give me a ride to the river which is a bit of a hike. Once I get to the river I can fish unlimited access as long as it is below the mean high water mark and there is an insane amount of bugs over there. The entire time, the native group will possibly, and quite likely be, trying to scare me off. And this might be one of the last summers that the river if productive. Seems like I have to know the guy behind the guy to get my line wet over there. But I also understand it's worth it!

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KUB_AIR View Post
    Let me see if I got this right. I can't fly into Tyonek b/c it native corp owned (without paying an arm and a leg for their services, like Carl Malone did). However, but I can fly into Bluega(?), right? Once I land I can pay Joe Schmow, $20 round trip to give me a ride to the river which is a bit of a hike. Once I get to the river I can fish unlimited access as long as it is below the mean high water mark and there is an insane amount of bugs over there. The entire time, the native group will possibly, and quite likely be, trying to scare me off. And this might be one of the last summers that the river if productive. Seems like I have to know the guy behind the guy to get my line wet over there. But I also understand it's worth it!

    You pretty much nailed it. I worked there for three years(Beluga). Same story every year. First day of king season, natives had the public access locked up. We go back and call ADF&G , next day, the gate was open, but the natives were peeking around the trees at you the whole time. Great fishing though.

  15. #15

    Default The Chuit

    The Chuit is a gift. I am sorry, but in a way I am glad that it's sorta hard for a lot of folks to get into. There are many days when I won't see a single person or group, that's so refreshing I can't put it into words.
    Marc Theiler

  16. #16

    Default

    you could also fish kings on the Lewis and Theodore (single hook, no bait, no retention) without any hassle at all.

    Its Beluga (as in the whale).

    I think I remember seeing planes parked in an area near it. That's all I can add.

  17. #17
    Mark
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by theilercabin View Post
    The Chuit is a gift. I am sorry, but in a way I am glad that it's sorta hard for a lot of folks to get into.
    Yeah. I know.

    That's what subsistence and controlled use areas are all about:

    "It's mine!..........."

  18. #18

    Default

    The original question of landing and parking your own plane still doesn't seem to be answered. You could ask the airstrip owners (Tyonek strip owned by natives; Beluga strip by Arco Alaska), spernak (who flies a schedule out there), or some locals in that area.

    Didn't want to imply a strip was public, whether the owners care or not; I just don't know.

  19. #19
    Member klickman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    196

    Default fishing the chuit

    Here is the low down. Both airstrips are private. If you don't know anybody over there or you dont own a helicopter it will be very hard to access the Chuit. Even if you find some wheels over there, there are only a couple of access pts. The hikes into the river can be a little tough.
    Klickman

  20. #20
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Mean streets of Fairview
    Posts
    1,140

    Default Airstrips

    Having fished the Beluga area for 25 years, I have learned some things. Some were harder that others.
    The Tyonek strip is private. Early in my learning I found out that they will chain a barrel to your plane and request a $2500 landing fee, a $2500 taxi/parking fee and $2500 takeoff fee. I knew enough names to drop that we didn't pay, but my buddy does not land there any more.
    The strip in Beluga is private, currently controlled by Conoco Phillips. They require a 5 million dollar insurance policy to utilize the strip. There is more to this, but it is not public knowledge.
    Spernak will drop you there for $140 round trip. You will need a ride to any fishing areas. The closest to the strip is about 5 miles away.
    The Chuit River lodge is a fair deal. He can feed and house you and drop you near the river access points. I could probably get a better rate if you are interested. There is also Beluga Lou, Joe Caraway and a couple of others around that guide.
    The Chuit is very good when the fish are in. The Theodore is a fun river to fish. It is a small clear river that has lots of holes in it. When I started fishing there we would tent camp and hike up and down the river. You cannot keep those fish anymore. But dam it is fun fishing. I fish the Beluga River, but a boat is needed for that. The Lewis is good at times, but it is a ways out there. Little Three Mile Creek gets a few Reds and Silvers. It crosses the road, but it isn't wilderness fishing. Three Mile Lake has pike and rainbows.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Live life and love it
    Love life and live it

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •