Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: It's Time......

  1. #1
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default It's Time......

    It's been coming for awhile now, so I really think it's about time to refinish my old girl now......Rem 700 in 8mm Mag. As much as I wouldn't mind a synth stock, I just really have a weak spot for the walnut. This time I was thinking about just oil, but I'm not really dead set on it. So I just want to ask some of you what you think I may want to consider.

    Thanks Much.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  2. #2
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Well with the walnut weak spot itís hard to beat Birchwood Caseyís stain/Tru-Oil kits for looks and ease of use.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  3. #3
    Member The Kid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    1,089

    Default

    Remington's poly finish can be a mother to get stripped off if it's not already lifting and flaking. My suggestion, hit up eBay or on of the online stores and buy another walnut BDL stock. Stick the old one in the closet, that way you can drag it out and relive all the old nicks and scuffs from your hunting and guiding trips of days gone by. Watch the gunshows this winter as well, I've seen some nice old Remington stocks for sale for less than a hundred bucks at the last few gunshows, and you don't have to pay shipping. Just make sure they have the magnum barrel channel before you buy.

  4. #4
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    If your rifle is clean and works give it a facelift the same time you get yours.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default

    I'll have to post a picture of my 1963ish vintage (20K SN range) Rem 700 in 7mm Rem Mag. All the finish is off the stainless steel barrel and the stock has a coat of something over the orginal crappy pressed checkering. It has real character - a real Alaskan rifle. I won't touch anything on it for anything except I've got to get a vintage scope & mounts back on it.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  6. #6
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Kid View Post
    Remington's poly finish can be a mother to get stripped off if it's not already lifting and flaking.
    I stripped it years ago the same time I glass bedded it. It's been so long ago that I can't even remember what I used on it....I think some light poly. The poly, or whatever it was, has now worn off in a number of places so it's pretty much like bare wood now. I may look at finding a new stock, but if I did that I may just go with a synth as much as I really don't want to. I do have to do something though as when I refinished it before I also floated the barrel. The last time I checked the dollar bill didn't slide down very far. So something has changed in there. Still just undecided that's why I was looking for some input....

    Thanks again....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  7. #7
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    Well with the walnut weak spot itís hard to beat Birchwood Caseyís stain/Tru-Oil kits for looks and ease of use.
    Good thing about that readily avail tru-oil, is you can do exact matching touch-ups at the end of the season. The stain is too dark though, you have to dillute it a bit. For a working rifle, it's an acceptable finish.

  8. #8
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    Good thing about that readily avail tru-oil, is you can do exact matching touch-ups at the end of the season. The stain is too dark though, you have to dillute it a bit. For a working rifle, it's an acceptable finish.
    Yea the stain is a concentrate, says on the bottle to cut it 50/50 with water and if it still goes on too dark to wipe with wet rag to lighten it. I like that itís so dark because it will take a blond wood like birch dark enough, most stains make blond woods look like poorly finished blond woods but this dark stuff will acutely make them a walnut color so you got to look at the grain to see itís not walnut.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  9. #9

    Default

    I'll toss this in. I was shop boy for a "name" gunsmith back in the late 60's. Spent a lot of time with a broom in my hands for sure, but also spent a lot of time stretching on BLO and TruOil finishes. Bottom line, I know how to do it and have done very pro finish jobs on many dozens of guns with it over the years.

    But in the last 5 years or so, I've found something I like even better. It's Formby's Tung Oil Low Gloss Finish. Been using it on maple and walnut in traditional muzzleloaders and not only is it tougher than any linseed variations I've tried, it also looks better. There's a gloss version too, but I prefer the low gloss.

    You can stretch it on just like TruOil, with the only difference being you want it REALLY dry between coats. It fills grain just as well and touches up just as well as TruOil, too. But it's a miles tougher finish. Try it on something small first to convince yourself, but I'm betting your test will have you using it on rifle stocks, too.

  10. #10
    Member marshall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Near Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    1,814

    Default

    Brown Bear,

    I'm a rookie with finishes but I work hard until I get done with good coverage. I used three coats of hand rub satin poly applied with a worn out piece of T-Shirt on this bow. The following day I used a foam brush to lay a heavier coat.

    My neighbor Jack uses the same process but wet sands between coats with a gloss finish. His bow has the pool view. Jack refinished the ugly light tan laminated stock on my daughters target 204 Ruger with a dark stain and several coats of gloss poly. It looks awesome but it's very soft and easily scratched.

    How does the Formby's Tung Oil compare to poly?

    first poly coat.jpg Leopard bow 5.jpg

  11. #11
    Member marshall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Near Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    1,814

    Default

    The pic on the left is another light tan laminated stock that represents the color my daughter wasn't found of. The pic on the right is the stripped, dark stained and poly finished Ruger 204 I mentioned in the previous post.

    Before.jpg Kaylee's 204 Ruger.jpg

  12. #12
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I'll toss this in. I was shop boy for a "name" gunsmith back in the late 60's. Spent a lot of time with a broom in my hands for sure, but also spent a lot of time stretching on BLO and TruOil finishes. Bottom line, I know how to do it and have done very pro finish jobs on many dozens of guns with it over the years.

    But in the last 5 years or so, I've found something I like even better. It's Formby's Tung Oil Low Gloss Finish. Been using it on maple and walnut in traditional muzzleloaders and not only is it tougher than any linseed variations I've tried, it also looks better. There's a gloss version too, but I prefer the low gloss.

    You can stretch it on just like TruOil, with the only difference being you want it REALLY dry between coats. It fills grain just as well and touches up just as well as TruOil, too. But it's a miles tougher finish. Try it on something small first to convince yourself, but I'm betting your test will have you using it on rifle stocks, too.
    Thanks for the info BB....!!!

    btw.....you're an old fart like me...!!!......lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  13. #13
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Try it on something small first to convince yourself, but I'm betting your test will have you using it on rifle stocks, too.
    I forgot to ask.....Do you have any pics of anything you put the Formby's on?

    Thanks.......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  14. #14
    Member preed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Posts
    490

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    As much as I wouldn't mind a synth stock, I just really have a weak spot for the walnut.
    i can make a synthetic stock look like walnut, just a thought
    lots of wood grains... http://www.themasterangler.com/galle...2_itemId=10944

  15. #15
    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    PANC
    Posts
    1,117

    Default

    I've used spray-on Spar-Urethane for a tough finish. Looks as good as any factory gun, and is very weather resistant.

  16. #16
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    My problem with putting on oil finishes is the way it fills up spaces in checkering. I just refinished a Weatherby stock using Watco Rejuvenating Oil and I had this problem. I will probably have to go back and "chase" the checkering lines to get some of it out after the oil completely dries... if I feel ambitious.

  17. #17
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,402

    Default

    The first rifle I ever owned had no checkering so I used linseed oil, hand rubbed, probably 6-8 coats (1968). It was a 98 Mauser made in Ergford Germany, 1918 in .257 Roberts, Walnut stock, bent the bolt down, open sights with a 4X Weaver. It had a nice finish, not ultra shiny but nice. Jack O'Connor would have been proud of me. I have also used tung oil on wood and for someone wanting a nice finish that can be easily repaired without having to refinish the entire rifle it might be the easy way to go. I am not into mirror like finishes on working rifles.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  18. #18
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    How does the Formby's Tung Oil compare to poly?
    It is varnish (probably poly), just with some Tung oil thrown in to be able to call it Tung Oil. In reality, it's really good stuff, but not tung oil. All polys are not created equal and it's as big of an argument among wood workers as the caliber arguments are between gun nuts.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •