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Thread: Dollies as Table fare?

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    Member nrc's Avatar
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    Default Dollies as Table fare?

    Can anyone compare or contrast Dolly Varden recipes to other trout or salmon species?

    I found this on the AK dfg site:

    "Like its close relative, the Eastern brook trout, the Dolly Varden is excellent for eating. Catch one which has been has been at sea for awhile, and you have a fish unsurpassed in quality."

    What about those which are landlocked (Eklunta lake)?

    Thanks in advance -

    Nate

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    In my experience, Dollies that are landlocked are tasty, but without as much flavor as their sea-run counterparts and with softer flesh. Add some garlic and a touch of cajun seasoning salt, and they're great.

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    Member AKducks's Avatar
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    I love them dollies they taste great I just cook them with cornmeal in a slightly oiled skillet and oh man its heaven

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    OOOOH! Dolly Varden, cook em in a iron skillet with about a pound of butter, sweet. Better yet, setup a campfire, put them in some tin foil with a pound of butter and a lemon, wrap it up, throw said package in the fire. When done open and enjoy. Only one thing better, Cutts the same way.

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    I like this epw guy. He knows about butter. That's how I used to cook my rainbows around Ketchikan. Some of the best tasting fish I've ever eaten.
    "Wine can of their wits the wise beguile, Make the sage frolic, and the serious smile." - Homer, Odyssey

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    Default deep fried

    We like to dip them in a little flour and then deep fry them until crispy. I might just have to have some for dinner tonight!

    FM

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    Thanks ripface. Dad taught me about butter when we used to go up to some alpine lakes in Colorado. He used to carry a tent, two sleeping bags, iodine, and a crap-ton butter for us and that was all. I remember asking what we were going to eat and he would respond "Heaven. Thats what the butters for, boy." I learned about butter and rainbow trout then.

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    Default Dolly do-right...

    Here's a tip. After you bleed this fish store your fillets in salted water before you render or preserve them. The salt firms the flesh.

    The dolly is sometimes poohed by the local due to preference in catching and eating salmon. Don't believe it. It is outstanding table fare and a luscious smoker...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

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    Member nrc's Avatar
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    Default Giddy up...

    "Deep Fried....
    or
    Cajun Seasoning and Garlic...
    or
    Cast Iron Skillet w/ 1lb of Butter."

    We're all gonna get along just fine.

    Thanks fellas'

    Nate

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Dolly's are great coated in a thin beer batter (best beer for the batter is a stout homebrew) and fried quick in a smokin hot pan!

    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Thumbs up My way. . . .



    The best dollies are small, under 14" at most, but smaller if you can get them. Head & gut, wash thoroughly, removing kidney, salt & pepper inside & out, roll in flour, shake off excess, and fry in hot bacon grease until crispy.

    Catch-and-release in bacon grease. . .


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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post


    The best dollies are small, under 14" at most, but smaller if you can get them. Head & gut, wash thoroughly, removing kidney, salt & pepper inside & out, roll in flour, shake off excess, and fry in hot bacon grease until crispy.

    Catch-and-release in bacon grease. . .

    Your right Marcus, the best ones are small. For a firmer flesh, got to get them cooking quick, fresh from the river. Ain't got no bacon grease here. How about frying in rendered bear fat or some rendered beaver oil?
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    maybe a post for the smoking recipe sticky, but I'd love to see some trout/char/dollie smoking recipies - I tried it for the first time last weekend on a few char and rainbows I had, but I need more direction and/or practice!

    Here's what I did -

    brine = gallon of water, cup of salt, half cup dark brown sugar. Dried under a fan after the brine until pelicle formed. Smoked with a pan of apple and a pan and a half of alder for probably five hours.

    How'd it turn out?

    I don't think I brined it long enough (two hours?) the thin peices had great flavor (if not a little too salty) but the thicker pieces around the spine were lacking.

    Also, I don't think my little chief smoker got hot enough - it was 50 or so outside and windy...after 5 hours it was still much more moist than I like it - so I finished it off in the oven. Think I got it too hot too fast (probably should have used 175 instead of 250!), but in the end it still tasted very good. Ate it all by the next night and my kids devoured it right along with me!

    I'm hooked on smoked trout but I need to refine my methods a bit. Help me out!

  14. #14

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    Nothin beat a little campfire next to the bank after catching a few fresh dollies. Seriously, my mouth started watering when I started reading this post...I wonder if the lake is broken up yet....

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    Default Poached

    - Take your fresh dollie, or most any trout or even a humpy and clean it well.
    - Get some heavy duty foil and make a two-layer "boat" a little bigger than the fish.
    - Fire up your barbeque.
    - Stuff the gut cavity with onion, chunks of butter or margerine, and spices and herbs (I like Italian seasoning, garlic salt, cayene peper, and coarse ground black pepper).
    - Place the fish in the boat and surround it with a mixture of water, lemon juice and beer or white wine (optional).
    - Place onion and lemon rounds on top of the fish and place it on the grill.
    - Throw some wood chunks on the flame for flavor.
    - Baste the fish occasionally, but don't overcook (flesh should flake when forked - how about that for alliteration!).

    This works very well for winter king too, but go easy on the liquid, as a blackmouth makes its own juice.

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akjw7 View Post
    Also, I don't think my little chief smoker got hot enough - it was 50 or so outside and windy...after 5 hours it was still much more moist than I like it - so I finished it off in the oven. Think I got it too hot too fast (probably should have used 175 instead of 250!), but in the end it still tasted very good. Ate it all by the next night and my kids devoured it right along with me!
    My wife wraps her smokers with a wool blanket to help keep the temperatures up. They aren't the same color they used to be. I wouldn't suggest draping the entire smoker, leave some space at the bottom and don't put the smoker next to the house just in case. She hasn't had any issues using the blankets but it never hurts to error on the side of caution. A smoked house wouldn't be very useful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by akjw7 View Post
    Here's what I did -

    brine = gallon of water, cup of salt, half cup dark brown sugar. Dried under a fan after the brine until pelicle formed. Smoked with a pan of apple and a pan and a half of alder for probably five hours.

    How'd it turn out?

    I don't think I brined it long enough (two hours?) the thin peices had great flavor (if not a little too salty) but the thicker pieces around the spine were lacking.

    Also, I don't think my little chief smoker got hot enough - it was 50 or so outside and windy...after 5 hours it was still much more moist than I like it - so I finished it off in the oven. Think I got it too hot too fast (probably should have used 175 instead of 250!), but in the end it still tasted very good. Ate it all by the next night and my kids devoured it right along with me!

    I'm hooked on smoked trout but I need to refine my methods a bit. Help me out!
    I think you have it about figured out. Two hours should have been plenty long enough to brine the fish granted the brine was strong enough. It's as you say. . . too cold in the smoker, too hot in the oven.

    Check this site for an inexpensive, insulated smoker—about $250:
    http://www.sausagemaker.com/index.as...ATS&Category=4

    I've used the #41000 model for close to 15 years now and love it.

    Last edited by Marcus; 07-31-2007 at 08:54.

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    disregard double post
    Last edited by akjw7; 05-03-2007 at 09:41. Reason: double post

  19. #19
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    Thanks Marcus - even as botched as this attempt was it still came out very tasty - can't wait to get it dialed in. We typically only keep a couple of rainbows or char when I take the kids out - if we're smoking them we may start keeping some more of those 12" stockers.

    That 41000 looks ideal...I may have to make a sales pitch to the ministry of finance that contrasts the one time smoker investment with expensive commercially smoked fish!
    Last edited by akjw7; 05-03-2007 at 09:41.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    - Take your fresh dollie......
    That's the way I see it.

    I find dollies outstanding when fresh, like halibut, grayling, lake trout, and pike. But after being frozen, it loses most of it's excellent flavor/texture.

    The fish that seem to freeze best are salmon (especially reds), cod, burbot, and rockfish.

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