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Thread: Artichoke, Rose help

  1. #1
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Default Artichoke, Rose help

    I am growing a couple of artichokes. They had a tough summer with aphids and spider mites. Never did grow chokes. One that I had set outside in isolation appeared to either die or go dormant. He went into the garage, cool and dark. The other stayed in the greenhouse.

    The one in the garage has started growing. It's a foot tall and very pale. The one in the GH is still going strong, putting out new growth.
    I also have roses in the GH still blooming, but want to put them to bed. Last year the roses in the garage started growing (again, very pale) and died when I put them in the GH. I am doing something wrong. Maybe opening the garage door is letting in enough light to spark the growth.

    Does anyone know how I can force them into dormancy? And keep them there.
    I want them to renew their efforts next spring, but don't need to babysit them all winter. I plan on freezing the GH out this winter when the tomatoes quit giving me fruit.
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    Last year I cut back my artichokes, dug them up, potted them, and put them under the house for the winter. They grew pale stalks in the dark; didn't have any light, but I did water them about once a month. In the spring I planted them back in the garden, cut off most of the pale stalks, and they grew quite well. I harvested some nice artichokes from them. Hope you have success with yours!

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    All right then. I will move them into the garage and plan on cutting the new growth next spring.
    You are growing them in the yard? Never wudda think...

    Thanks!
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    Default Chokes and Roses

    As far as roses, my wife has grown them in pots from the rooted little things we buy from a given store, and they always do good. However, this past summer she told me she was going to plant them in her flower garden, and I kinda chuckled thinking the cooler soil would hinder their growth. I was amazed, the plants were huge, and probably set over a hundred blooms for the total season, 2 full cycles worth until they froze, amazing. With that said, I think just buying a small potted rose every year, plant it in good soil, in the ground, is the best value to hassle, and quality of investment one could do with a warm weather rose in AK.
    I also have a Hansea, a perenial, if you don't know about them, by the house, that is 7ft and produces a couple hunderd blooms and man does it smell wonderful. If you don't want the hassle of storing a rose, or don't want to buy new starts every year, they are pretty nice. Here's a pic of ours, past prime bloom season, but you get an idea how big they get, and can see the color of the double pettle blooms.

    Do the Artichokes produce their first year, and if so, when do you start the seed?
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    Mark, Imperial Star is a variety which will produce the first year from seed. I started mine in February, potted them up as they grew, and then planted them out in the garden. They're a pretty big plant once they get going, and like fairly deep soil. Some plants won't develop into good producers, so I plan on roguing out the weak ones, and plant extra seeds for that reason.

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    I planted my chokes around March. They never got any heads all summer. The aphids and mites slowed them down.
    At the time I had no idea that some varieties are perennial. So when nothing developed I figured I have to keep them going until next year.

    I really have no idea what I am doing. I planted them on a lark. In pots.

    I cut that one back and packed it out to the garage, with the pale one,for the winter. We'll see what happens next spring.
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    Bullbuster, you may have success next spring with the ones you're overwintering. But next February or March, try seeding some Imperial Star chokes indoors and potting them up until you can plant them out. They do need at least 10 days of temps in the 40's in the spring, which will trick the plants into thinking they've been through a winter. Then they'll produce chokes for you the same season, if you keep them fed. Good luck!

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    Default Chokes

    Do they do better in a GH or are they fine in a garden, if so is ground covering necessary? On a good plant how many artichokes are you getting, and are they decent size ones?

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    They do just fine outside. They like it cool and moist. I have raised beds, and planted 4 plants in a bed with good soil. I had worked some compost into the bed, and fertilized with fish fertilizer several times during the season. Each plant will produce one nice-sized artichoke on the terminal bud, and several small ones on laterals.

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    One of my gardening books says that to overwinter artichokes, cut off the stalk about 6 inches above the crown. Remove all the soil from the roots, and store them in a mesh bag in a cool, moist place. Then plant out again in the spring. I haven't tried that, as I don't have a cool, moist place to keep the roots overwinter. But in a root cellar, it might be worth a try.

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Sounds like it's worth a try. Thanks.

    I already cut one down to about 3", but that is close enough. I'll lose the dirt and find a place.
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    Bullbuster, let us know next spring if that overwintering technique worked for you, please.

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    Default Large Artichokes in Alaska

    Imperial Star that was started in March and set outside, as a young plant, for 200 or more hours under 50 degrees in the spring. Works like a charm, this plant could have had better care too, still worked. Start seed in March, set out every day you can when temp is above freezing, they can really take the cold, can even withstand a snow covering as long as its around freezing. Fun and nice plants too.
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