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Thread: Freight sled, need input

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Default Freight sled, need input

    Ok, I'm building a freight sled to be pulled mainly behind a snowmachine. I picked up a very heavy older sled that used aircraft skis and is in desperate need of a rebuild. I've torn it apart and plan on refurbishing the skis a bit and would like some input on building the frame. The idea is for a 4x8 deck. I plan on making it about 50" wide to accommodate all that 49" stuff we end up hauling.

    Any recommendations on hitch style or frame design?

    Here is what I am starting with -


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    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    The axle attaching the skis is solid 1 1/2" bar stock and is really heavy. I'm thinking already some weight savings can be found by changing that out.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

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    Member akriverunner's Avatar
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    akmud, what do you plan on hauling? is your trailer tongue going to be attached solid to the deck you have in the pic? if so you will have alot of tongue weight if you are hauling heavy materials. i built pretty much the same sled a 4x8' frame with expanded metal so could tie stuff down anywhere and it had a solid tongue. needless to say i used it maybe half a dozen times, wasnt happy with it. i built a four ski sled and love it.
    21' RMX Cargo Jet

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    I also built one of my own sleds after having a few different models. I built one of the 4 ski models and they have uhmw skis and I will never go back. I could put dozens of eggs on the thing and never have a single one break. I have also had around 6000 lbs on it and as long as you can get it going it will haul the weight. If you have any interest in building one let me know and I still have the jig for making the a-frames for the skis. I don't know very much about welding and I made it in my garage in a couple of evenings. With all of the material I probably have around a grand into building 2 of them.

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Marbs, I'd love to check out what you built. Any pics by chance? Also, what did you come up with for a hitch?
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

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    Can I jump into your thead? Hope so ... at any rate, I am a Powder Mountain rider and we just bought a remote cabin this past Spring and now we will be hauling supplies and equipment out to the cabin and wanted to ask advice to cabin folks about the best freight sled to haul ... building supplies such as plywood and beams and misc equipment. Any pics or design ideas would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

    I already have an aluminum freighter built by Husky Manufacturing for normal weekend supplies and fuel drums but I cant see hauling sheets of plywood and long beams in this low running type of sled.

    Highlife

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Rob, i would seriously consider using a UHM type tongue.. or design to help keep the track debris off the load..
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    I hadn't planned to do a 4 ski design... I may change that after hearing from others, but at this point I need a tongue design that will handle some tongue weight. I only have the two aircraft skis for now. Not sure how a sled would handle with the two big skis in back and two smaller snowmachine skis up front, but it may be where I end up. If I did that then the tongue options really open up.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

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    The best freight hauler sleds will have 4 skis that support all the weight on the sled. The front skis should be attached to the hitch yoke so the front skis turn to follow the pulling machine while the deck and back skis follow behind. The popular Yentna sleds work like that. I have a Swedish Sled that uses the same principal but is lower to the snow and doesn't have a deck attached as part of the sled. My sled is adjustable for length and width. I attach a platform to it for many loads but for lumber and plywood it doesn't need a platform. Regardless of the final design I'd advise you to avoid tongue weight at all costs. For small loads I have what I call go-fast sleds. One is a Bush Sled by Mike's welding. I have two ATECs that are similar. The Bush Sled's ski pedestals are mounted aft on the cargo box. That makes tongue weight. The ATEC design centers the ski pedestal under the box. Both have similar tongue articulation for load leveling through the bumps. The ATECs ride better and pull better but most of all the're way easier on the machine and rider since the tongue weight isn't loading the machine's suspension. One ATEC has suspension and one doesn't. The older, non-suspension sled rides better than the suspended ATEC or the Bush Sled. GREAT design.

    Type of load, type of terrian, and type of machine you'll hook it to all play important roles in sled design. Deep snow and no bumps favor Siglins. If there's a base under the snow and there are any bumps on the trail the 4 ski designs are better to pull and offer much better freight platforms.

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    Working on some pics now should have them up soon.

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    Here are some pics not very good but all I have. These are pics without the deck on it which is how I use it while hauling lumber. Otherwise I have a deck made out of 2x12's


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    Is the front truck steerable? It looks like you have UHMW covered support arms? Very cool. Good idea. It looks like the front yoke is connencted to the front skis? How do you transition to the hitch?

    Nice work!

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    Here's mine. Many similarities. A few differences. Works great. I add a platform made of 2x6s when needed.
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    The front is steerable although it does not turn a great deal. It is hard to see but in the first picture you can see a bit of a drop down slot that hold the front and another one in the rear that hold up the ski attachments. This tends to keep the skis from digging in. I don't have a pic right now of the hitch but the braces come foward and tie together and on the top I have a piece of pipe that has a piece of all thread with springs on either side and a large d ring for connecting to the j hook on the back of the sled.

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    Both of your sled designs are exactly what I was looking for. Thanks for posting. Did you make them yourselves or have it made? If so, who was the manufacture? Thanks again.

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    My sled is home built.

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    Default Freight sled, need input

    Ron out at desks landing used to build some nice river freight sleds. Might be worth chatting with him or looking looked similar to Marbs

  18. #18

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    Ron still makes one of the best sleds around. They hold up better than anyone else's that i have seen. A bit pricy, but you get what you pay for.

    Kevin
    2002 Wooldridge Sport 2000, 21', 350 Kodiak Jet, "CindyLou"
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    I built my own. I used some of the ideas from the ones that Ron builds and made some mods to make it better (I think). After building my own I understand why Ron charges as much as he does. I had about a grand in materials and that is no labor.

  20. #20

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    Nice job, both of you on the design and the build!

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