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Thread: Fort Yukon to Dalton Hwy?

  1. #1
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    Default Fort Yukon to Dalton Hwy?

    Hi. I am planning a float from upper Sheenjek to the Dalton River Bridge. Does anybody know how long the section from Fort Yukon to Dalton River Bridge is, and how long it will take?

    An additioal question; is the aufeis in the upper Sheenjek likely to be gone by late June?

    Thanks in advance!

    Martin

  2. #2
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    on Google earth it was about 135 miles as the crow flies if you want more do your home work how long will it take you if you are in the current
    it will take you a few days ??? yukon river is slow an a lots of twist an turns good luck that is about all I know you did not say if you will have a canoe or raft

  3. #3
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    Fort Yukon to the Dalton Bridge is 173.5 river miles, though the best route is not always obvious without considerable map study and an appreciation of where the current wants to take you, especially through the Flats. Unless you understand the currents and the flow around shoals, islands, and big river bends, and you plan well ahead of current flow changes, you may not always have a choice on your exact path.

    This mileage is derived from careful plotting on the map, and verified twice by actual GPS measurement (within a very small percentage error) while paddling. During the Yukon 1000 mile race this is the final leg and my team paddled it in a voyageur canoe twice (in 2009 and again in 2011). Both years it took us approximately 25 paddling hours to cover the distance, not including a 6-hour mandatory rest period. For comparison purposes, our cruising speed is fairly constant between 5.5-6.0 mph, not including current speed on top of that. Most people would enjoy taking considerably more time to do this, how much more is up to you. Bad weather can easily add a day or two.

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    right on , it looks like you have dun the trip , an spent a lot of tine on that part of the river as well as on the maps YKNPDLR , maraust should enjoy the information you presented here SID

  5. #5
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    Yknpdlr, was that a Wenonah Voyager canoe? How do you come up with the 5.5-6.0 mph speed? Is that your flatwater speed?

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    The captain of our voyageur canoe team owns a 28-foot woodstrip custom built by Grasse River Boatworks (GRB) in northern NY state, where most of the team lives. It was paddled in 2007 in the Yukon River Quest (YRQ), Whitehorse to Dawson. I joined for the YRQ in 2008. It returned to Whitehorse with us for the first running of the Yukon 1000 (Y1K) in 2009. But when we arrived we learned that a fellow tandem paddler friend had no partner due to sudden illness. Unfortunately our woodstrip could not accept another paddler and gear. We happened to know of a 34-foot long carbon fiber voyageur in storage in Whitehorse, known as the "Texan" (because it was built in Texas for the Yukon races). We were able to rent it and spent a day to reconfigure it for our crew addition. Even though it is a beast, the Texan is a surprisingly lightweight and fast boat, easily able to handle extra crew and extra mandatory gear and food required for the Y1K. Friends borrowed the GRB woodstrip in 2010 for the Y1K. Then my crew returned with it for the Y1K in 2011. We are due to do the YRQ again this coming June.

    A fresh well trained crew in a good voyageur canoe can maintain for several hours 6-6.5+ mph flatwater paddling, no current, no wind, minimal load. More heavily loaded and 18 hour days, paddling for 6 days on the water, a more realistic Y1K maintenance pace drops a bit to 5.5+ mph. Add 2-3 quick 10 minute rest stops over the 18 hours and the overall no-current average is something above 5 mph for the day. Now add that the Yukon river current can run 4-6 mph for much of the distance above Circle (except of course for Lake Laberge). We would constantly seek out the fastest current, being careful not to waste energy or distance doing so, in many cases weighing benefit of faster longer vs slower shorter distance. Sometimes a parallel course only a few yards away gained 1-2 mph in better current. We learned how to read the surface ripples and swirls and expectations due to upcoming terrain to find speed. Even the Flats below Circle flows at 3-4 mph if you know where to look for it. Some shortcuts and tricky maneuvering pays off, others are disappointingly slow.

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