Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: 416 remington "scope bite"--help

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    butler,pa
    Posts
    62

    Angry 416 remington "scope bite"--help

    i have a 416 rem mag that has only one problem--actually not the rifles fault,i have the problem---every so often--15-20 rounds --i'll get smacked in the glasses--would moving the scope to a "scout" position work or do i just put up with the occasional discomfort?---thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Grass Lake Michigan
    Posts
    1,978

    Default Brother had the same problem

    EZ,

    My brother had the same problem with his 300 Wby Winchester model 70. His scope cut his nose several times. In fact the line officer at the local state range said he was the only person to bleed on his course! Well, he switched from a middle of the road simmons to a Leupold with a 4.5 inch eye relief. Thats all it took. I have a VX-3 2-7 x 33 on my 375 H&H and it doesn't come close. Just my 2 cents. I hope it helps.

    Ron

  3. #3
    Member Alaskacajun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    318

    Default

    I have a .300 Wtby Mag. I've noticed that when sighting in my rifle at the local gun range, if I don't position the rifle high enough it get's really close to kissing my forehead. I've actually had it slightly touch my eyebrow before. If I move the rifle up higher it puts me in a better shooting position and then it doesn't even come close. Maybe you're doing the same thing....

    - Clint

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    First, make sure your scope has a long eye relief. This is one thing the higher priced Leupolds have going for them such as the VX and Vari X III's. Next purchase a set of extension rings that allow the scope to be mounted more forward. Problem solved and no need to go to the scout set up unless you really want to.
    Tennessee

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
    Posts
    1,494

    Default

    I have a Leupold on my .416 and been shooting it for years and yet to be nailed.

  6. #6
    New member Fubar's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Southeast Tennessee
    Posts
    7

    Default

    I use the scout setup on my 45/70 and I wouldn't use anything else. It's about as quick with both eyes open as you can get. Now if you had all kinds of time and liked those fancy variable optics....Then I would move it a little farther down the receiver and try it. No point in getting stitches if you don't have to!

  7. #7
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ezmarsh View Post
    i have a 416 rem mag that has only one problem--actually not the rifles fault,i have the problem---every so often--15-20 rounds --i'll get smacked in the glasses--would moving the scope to a "scout" position work or do i just put up with the occasional discomfort?---thanks in advance
    The stock dimensions, the scope position and your build all come into this. You only get hit every 15-20 shots. That make me think maybe the scope is a little high and you have to stretch to it and sometimes forget to pull the rifle in to the shoulder with the left hand. This will allow the rifle to sit too low on the shoulder and allow that extra little bit of travel when it recoils. Does the rifle have sights also? Maybe there is too much drop for you.

    Certainly long eye relief scopes are the way to go on big hitter rifles and the Leupold is king there. Also shooting technique is more critical than with the lighter recoilers. Low power scopes make eye relief less critical also.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    2,145

    Default

    Yup. I moved a 1x Burris out on the barrel/receiver. Best thing I did. It is on an A-Square Hannibal model in .500 A-Square.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    butler,pa
    Posts
    62

    Default thanks for the comments

    i have a Swarovski 1.25-4x20 on this rifle,so a cheap scope is not the problem--was told this is THE scope to put on a large caliber bear gun,lots of low light capability,good eye relief etc,etc---reviewing the other comments i think it probable the problem is me--not paying close enough attention to shooting position---thanks again for the responses!

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ezmarsh View Post
    i have a Swarovski 1.25-4x20 on this rifle,so a cheap scope is not the problem--was told this is THE scope to put on a large caliber bear gun,lots of low light capability,good eye relief etc,etc---reviewing the other comments i think it probable the problem is me--not paying close enough attention to shooting position---thanks again for the responses!
    If you're speaking of the Swaro 1.25-4x24mm, that's a quality scope no doubt. But, the reality of that Swaro is it only has about 3" of eye relief and this is compounded by the extra long eye piece. It doesn't give you much room at all. Compare this to the simple LEU 2.5X UL that has almost 5" of eye relief with the added benefit of having a very short eye piece. This gives you ample room to work with. In addition, the LEU weighs less than half the huge Swaro which is one of the reasons this LEU holds up so well to hard kickers.

    GVA

  11. #11
    Member tyrex13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Anchorage/Soldotna
    Posts
    1,176

    Default

    I read most of the replys, but why not just use iron sights?

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    402

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ezmarsh View Post
    i have a Swarovski 1.25-4x20 on this rifle,so a cheap scope is not the problem--was told this is THE scope to put on a large caliber bear gun,lots of low light capability,good eye relief etc,etc---reviewing the other comments i think it probable the problem is me--not paying close enough attention to shooting position---thanks again for the responses!
    Yes, you do have a world class scope, And a .416 is an awesome caliber.

    I predict that after a few more bites from it, pain will be the teacher.

    You will only creep up on it too close only so many times till it teaches you to remember.

    No need to change anything unless you want to, although you could add a rubber ring to the occular housing as an eye bumper.

    jedi

  13. #13

    Smile Scope bite

    Scopes like alot of our outdoor/shooting equiptment are a compromise. We all see things differently. One of the reasons I use Leupolds is because of the eye relief. I know other scopes are probably brighter at night. One way they achieve this is by keeping your eye close to the scope at the cost of eye relief. So I am willing to sacrifice a little "brightness" to gain eye relief. Leaning into a scope at the bench or taking a shot at a steep uphill angle with a poor shooting position/technique on a large caliber rifle may result in the "scope bite". I have not been bite by a scope in over 30 years. LEUPOLD!

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    402

    Default me2

    I have Leupold 1.5-5 Vari X III scopes on my big guns and have avoided the bite as well.

    I dont think its his scope.

    Like he said, its him and his shooting...all the Swarovski scopes I have tested were just as world class as my Leupolds.

    Pain will be his teacher

    jedi

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Mountains of VA
    Posts
    224

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ezmarsh View Post
    ...i think it probable the problem is me--not paying close enough attention to shooting position...
    It has been my experience...

    When I "crawl" up on a rifle far enough to get bit...

    one of two things are responsible:

    1. Cheap scope - too little eye relief (not your problem in this case)

    2. Scope improperly mounted/rifle does not fit me.


    If the stock fits you perfectly it should come to shoulder exactly the same every time. Your eye should align with the sights every time, The stock should meet your cheek the same every time.

    The scope as well, should align properly each time you mount the rifle. You should not have to crawl forward or slide back to get the proper sight picture or give yourself proper clearance.

    If the gun don't fit you it may be time for a stock change or adjustment. It that don't do it you may need to dump that rifle and go shopping.


    The one thing that has helped me most over the years is adjusting the length-of-pull. Most guns come from the factory with 14 to 14.5 inches of LOP but I am comfortable with 13.5.

    You might think a shorter LOP would invite scope bite since I am closer to the scope but that is not true. If it fits better, I can control it better. I can handle the recoil better.

    Note: Consider what you will be wearing when you shoot the rifle. A heavy winter parka requires a shorter LOP. You can add a slip-on recoil pad on it in the warmer months to lengthen it slightly.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    402

    Default just a thought

    Just another thought....

    Sometimes we set scopes up for wearing winter gear (many layers thick) then when shooting at the range on a nice day with minimal clothing like just a t-shirt, you are now getting closer to a scope set for proper eye relief for several layers of thick stuff.

    Not as big a deal from standing but it seems to get worse when benched and your movement is confined somewhat.

    jedi

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    butler,pa
    Posts
    62

    Default

    jedi---i think you get the prize---went to the range yesterday--light T shirt--got smacked---folded up a blanket to use as a pad,which also equals a wool shirt and sweater,maybe---no problem rest of the day---i am surely creeping uo too close---thanks againt to you and everyone who responded

  18. #18
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    124

    Default magnum brow

    keeping a good cheek weld on the stock is important and as mentioned above, too much scope mount height and your face is hanging in the breeze.

    Leupold is classic for long eye relief. Others have it too if you choose carefully.

    Firm fit of the butt into the shoulder is also needed.

    If shooting from the bench...shoot more upright and not hunched into the gun on the bags. At Rabbit Creek they have a standing rest and that is the best to shoot and practice with ... also try shooting sticks.... or free standing.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •