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Thread: looking at land

  1. #1
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    Default looking at land

    Hey all

    I am looking at a piece of property that is for sale in my area. It is just under 7 acres, on the ocean. I have the means to get to it, we just looked it over the other day. My question is this, what does everybody think of building a large "deck" to put a wall tent up on for the summers until i can get the money to build a small cabin. I was thinking about a deck just large enough to put the tent on to, plus a little extra to use as a deck is intended. My thought is to set up the tent and leave it set up until fall hunts are over. Then go out, take it down, and bring it back to town for the winter. Other than ferrying the supplies needed to build the deck, what are some concerns i should think about before i start seriously attempting to purchase. Would i be better off saving money and using a dome tent style, or will a wall tent standup to the Kodiak weather, even in the summer. Or should i even consider leaving it up for any extended ammunt of time, without being there. Ive already firgured i would get a bear fence to put around the area, to keep unwanted guests from tearing it apart. Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member dieNqvrs's Avatar
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    Default looking at land

    Another idea:

    Weather ports are more sturdy and can be kept up for long periods of time.

    Fish and game uses them and have plywood decks/platforms they use year after year throughout the island.

    Many guides on Kodiak and peninsula uses the same setup as well.

  3. #3
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    Default Perhaps

    If i might suggest taking 1 or 2 empty 50 gallon barrels with sealable lids? When your not camping you can stow the tent and other camping gear. Imagine the fence that you would need to build to keep the bears from getting to your tent.

  4. #4
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    If you can get the weight in there a cheap used slide in camper or two set on a deck are great. The older pop-ups move easier and once there just take out the canvass wall and replace with wood.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  5. #5
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kodiak486 View Post
    Hey all

    I am looking at a piece of property that is for sale in my area. It is just under 7 acres, on the ocean. I have the means to get to it, we just looked it over the other day. My question is this, what does everybody think of building a large "deck" to put a wall tent up on for the summers until i can get the money to build a small cabin. I was thinking about a deck just large enough to put the tent on to, plus a little extra to use as a deck is intended. My thought is to set up the tent and leave it set up until fall hunts are over. Then go out, take it down, and bring it back to town for the winter. Other than ferrying the supplies needed to build the deck, what are some concerns i should think about before i start seriously attempting to purchase. Would i be better off saving money and using a dome tent style, or will a wall tent standup to the Kodiak weather, even in the summer. Or should i even consider leaving it up for any extended ammunt of time, without being there. Ive already firgured i would get a bear fence to put around the area, to keep unwanted guests from tearing it apart. Any advise would be greatly appreciated.
    I like the deck idea. It's proven, durable, and cost effective. dieNqvrs' weather port idea is a good one too. They cost a bit more than a wall tent, but are more durable and waterproof. The weather port won't rot or grow mold on you, and the framing can be stored on site during the winter. They're easily transported and assembled by one or two people. Add the bear fence and you're in business. That's the route I would choose.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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  6. #6
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    Default

    I spent alot of time in field camps in PWS over the years. For our more permanent camps we built wood decks like you are describing. They are a great way to go.

    A wall tent with an oil stove gets my vote. Weatherports get pretty humid whereas wall tents breathe. A weatherport frame with waxed cotton could be good if you could have one made. Good luck with it.

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