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Thread: Heating/Gyp crete source

  1. #1
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    Default Heating/Gyp crete source

    I just ran in to another little problem. I called Janes Brothers to have them come out and pour Gyp-Crete for my radiant heating and was told that my project is too small.

    Now I am looking for suggestions. I would like the radiant floor heat - for now I plan on living in it year-round. Can I just staple tubes under the floor (3/4" OSB) or do I need defuser plates if I go that route?

    Does anyone know of anyone else that pours gypcrete or a similar underlayment?

    I was also looking at the electric radiant floor heat. I did a heat load calculation and according to all published material it would be about the same cost to heat with electric then oil (boiler). Does anyone have any experience with electric?

    The cabin is smallish. Sealed good and insulated real good. I might through a wood stove or a toyo in - but I don't like large heating appliance taking up valuable space. Another reason why this electric stuff looks appealing.

    Any thoughts? I have double sole plates, but I guess I could fix the door height problem by cutting them both and tacking one at the top of the door.

    The cabin is in the Wasilla area. At Pt Mac Road and KGB.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    If you have electric you could go with a small Toyo stove that take up little space. The door problem would be easy fix.

  3. #3
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    When I lived in Kotzebue I think I had a monitor brand that actually attached to the wall. Very small unit that produced a lot of heat. The more I think about it the more I think I might just go that route. At least initially.

  4. #4
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    javaboy a lot of folks do the floor tubing a cheaper way and not use the deflectors by putting the tubing under the floor then use a layer of reflective insulation like r tec or the silver bubble wrap and it works fairly well. You can also use sleepers and staple the tubing on top of the floor...kind of creating a double floor but that depends on door heights and such

  5. #5
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    Call them back and see if they will sell you the gypcrete bags and mix your own. I know a couple folks up here have just used peagravel mix concrete in sacks and used that. Where are you going to put your boiler or water heater to heat the infloor? They will take up every bit the room a toyo or monitor heater will take up.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  6. #6

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    Doug, I thought that the monitor had gone by the wayside. ??

  7. #7

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    Like others have said, installing the radient tubing between the joists under the floor is a fairly common method. It isn't the best possible option, but still works well. Make sure to insulate under it well so you aren't losing the heat to the air below. They make special brackets to attach with to hold the tubing under the floor.

    Another option is that they do make laminant flooring with channels pre-cut underneath for the tubing, essentially a pre-fab radiant floor. You lose some height, but it sounds like you were already going to lose that with the gypcrete, so probably not an issue.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Bend View Post
    Doug, I thought that the monitor had gone by the wayside. ??
    My bad. It did. I still have three and forgot.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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