Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Do you need a Mode C transponder for Merrill Field

  1. #1
    Member avidflyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    222

    Default Do you need a Mode C transponder for Merrill Field

    Thats the question in a nut shell. I have not flown into Merrill in better than 10 yrs. I am at work right now and dont have any charts to look at. Can I still fly into Merrill without a transponder?

    Thanks

  2. #2

    Default

    Merrill is cass D. You only need two-way radio (and established communication) to fly into calss D airspace. No transponder is required. If you are flying through Anchorage class C or above it then you'll need mode C transponder.
    Quote Originally Posted by avidflyer View Post
    Thats the question in a nut shell. I have not flown into Merrill in better than 10 yrs. I am at work right now and dont have any charts to look at. Can I still fly into Merrill without a transponder?

    Thanks

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ftaba1 View Post
    Merrill is cass D. You only need two-way radio (and established communication) to fly into calss D airspace. No transponder is required. If you are flying through Anchorage class C or above it then you'll need mode C transponder.
    Better get a current chart, since you may not recall which class airspace goes governs which areas . . . . .

  4. #4
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,217

    Default

    I skirt the class C while remaining in contact with approach control, (later Lake Hood or Merrill tower) and I do not have a transponder in my old Cub.

    Like Griz says make sure you have a current Anchorage terminal area chart.
    Anchorage-Fairbanks 69 - May 31 2012 70 - Nov 15 2012


    Class C Airspace Operations


    Class C Depiction The Anchorage Class C airspace is regulatory airspace requiring mandatory adherence to the following:

    PILOT RESPONSIBILITIES

    (1) Pilot Certification - No special requirements.

    (2) Equipment - Two-way radio communications capability and Mode C transponder. Operations above Class C airspace require operating Mode C transponder.

    (3) Operations - All pilots shall establish and maintain two-way radio communications with the ATC facility having jurisdiction over that area prior to entering the regulatory portion of Class C airspace.

    NOTE: Because of this mandatory communications provision, FAR 91.75 is also applicable. It requires that, except in an emergency, all pilots shall comply with ATC instructions.

    Question: Do I need "permission" to enter Class C airspace?
    Answer: No. Pilots are only required to establish and maintain communications with Anchorage Approach Control prior to entering regulatory Class C airspace.

    Question: Must my aircraft be Mode C transponder equipped?
    Answer: Yes. A Mode C transponder is required for all flight in or above Class C airspace up to 10,000' MSL.

    Question: Which ATC facility do I contact?
    Answer: Anchorage Approach Control.

    ATC SERVICES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

    (1) Sequencing Arrivals. This service is provided to Anchorage International and Elmendorf AFB (as applicable).

    (2) Separation Between IFR Aircraft - Standard IFR separation.

    (3) Separation Between IFR and VFR Aircraft - Traffic advisories, conflict resolution* and wake turbulence separation.

    *Conflict Resolution: The resolution of potential conflictions between aircraft that are radar identified and in communication with ATC by ensuring that radar targets do not touch. Pertinent traffic advisories shall be issued when this procedure is applied. Conflict Resolution procedures will be used when visual separation cannot be applied and aircraft will not be separated by appropriate vertical separation minima. (500 foot vertical separation or 1,000 foot vertical separation when operating below heavy aircraft and B757s).

    (4) Separation Between VFR Aircraft - ATC will furnish traffic information and safety advisories as needed.

    Question: How does conflict resolution work?
    Answer: ATC issues traffic advisories to IFR and VFR radar targets projected to merge.

    (a) If VFR traffic reports IFR traffic in sight, or vice versa, that aircraft will be instructed to maintain visual separation.

    (b) If neither pilot has visual contact, ATC will take control actions to ensure radar targets do not merge by issuing vectors to either aircraft, or by issuing altitude assignments to ensure vertical separation of 500 feet or 1,000 feet when below heavy jets and B757s.

    Question: Does Approach Control apply separation between VFR aircraft?
    Answer: No, ATC only issues traffic information and, if needed, safety advisories. This also applies between VFR arrivals being sequenced to Anchorage International and Elmendorf Air Force Base.

    Question: Does ATC require VFR arrivals and departures to and from Anchorage International to maintain an assigned altitude?
    Answer: ATC does not usually assign VFR aircraft an altitude. Altitudes are assigned in the application of conflict resolution. Some coded VFR arrival/departure routes contain altitude restrictions. The altitude restrictions of FAR 93 apply at all times.

    OPERATIONS within 5NM of Anchorage International Airport: Airports that are within a 5NM radius of Anchorage International Airport (Anchorage International, Sand Lake, and in some instances Campbell Lake) are procedurally handled as one airport. Additionally, pilots departing this area who are climbing to an altitude below 1,400 feet will receive continuing radar services unless the pilot wishes the service terminated. Pilots not desiring this continuing service must advise Approach Control that they want the service terminated. A small triangular portion of this area covers land west of Point Mackenzie along the north shore of Knik Arm from the surface to 4100' MSL.

    OPERATIONS between 5NM and 10 NM of Anchorage International Airport: This area encompasses the Pt. Mackenzie area from 1400' to 1900' MSL. This airspace abuts the regulatory airspace of FAR 93. Do not misconstrue the altitudes in this area to be an adjustment to FAR 93. The provisions of FAR 93.59 - 93.69 ARE STILL IN EFFECT. You are required to comply with these provisions (even if operating in Class C airspace) unless you receive authorization to do otherwise from Anchorage Approach Control.

    Question: An aircraft departing Lake Hood is flying to Beluga following the north shoreline of the Knik Arm. Is the pilot required to contact Anchorage Approach Control?
    Answer: Yes, if the pilot will be climbing to 1400' MSL or above. However, if the pilot operates at an altitude below 1400' MSL and remains north of the power lines until clear of the 5NM radius of Anchorage International Airport, the requirement to contact Approach Control does not apply.

    Note: The 5NM radius of Anchorage International Airport extends north of the Point Mackenzie Substation approximately 3/4 of a mile. The Class C Airspace in this area includes airspace from the surface to 4,100' MSL.

    Question: An aircraft departing Merrill Field is flying to Big Lake and crossing Knik Arm at 2000' MSL or above. Is the pilot required to contact Anchorage Approach Control?
    Answer: No, this aircraft will be above Class C airspace in the 1400'-1900' MSL area.

    Note: An operating Mode C transponder is required above Class C airspace.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  5. #5

    Default

    As a recent visitor to the area, I will relate my experience with flying into and out of Merrill field. As was stated earlier, Merrill is a class D airport. It is not inside the Stevens Int'l class C airspace. When I arrived I came in from the north and went around the Elmendorf airspace to the west, as Anchorage approach told me to do. Whereas I have a transponder and was using a squawk code it is not required if you stay clear of the areas that require one. Generally GA planes fly into and out of Merril airspace by crossing the Knik arm between Pt No Name and Pt Mackenzie when coming from the Northwest. It is a narrow corridor to the north of the field between it and Elmendorf. Just stay south of Ship creek and you are OK. Most GA planes fly at 1200' MSL into and out of the field (this keeps you below the 1400' floor of the Stevens class C area on the west bank of the knik arm). I seriously doubt that many of the bush planes parked at Merrill have transponders. I know that that upon departure, contact with clearance delivery such as is required at class C airports was not required (Merrill doesn't have one), and a squawk code was not issued on the several occasions that I departed Merrill.

    Get a copy of the Alaska supplement. It has detailed maps showing the preferred routes to use.

    regards,
    Bruce

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    In the absence of charts, here's a link to Anchorage area airport procedures, including Merrill. I'm a Hood strip guy and transponder equipped but rarely get a code from clearance delivery. I save that for SVFR days and usually squalk VFR in mode C for everyday ops. I've never had an assigned code going into or coming out of Merrill. I believe the previous altitude advice is incorrect. Merrill's airspace dictates under 600' or above 2200' over the water to the northwest. You can request an altitude deviation and if JBER is quiet you'll get it. Even without a transponder. Avoiding ANC airspace is pretty simple. They've expanded a little to the east and have changed the old traditional reporting points and routes. Coming from the KP I'd gues you'll use the Campbell Airstrip arrival. Cross the inlet to Potter Marsh, fly a mile east of abbott to Campbell Airstrip @ 1200', and ATC will direct you from there.

    http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/..._info/locproc/

  7. #7

    Default

    I just checked the Alaska supplement for the advised procedures for flying into Merrill. Pid is correct about flying below 600' or above 2200' when crossing Knik arm as being the advised altitudes. However, these are only "advised" and not regulated altitudes. This is to avoid traffic that may be coming into or out of Elmendorf, as the main runway there is directly aligned with the traffic making a shoreline departure out of Merrill. You can fly at any altitude that is not restricted by class C airspace or such since in that area you are hopefully being directed by someone's traffic control. The 1200' altitude is the recommended altitude for traffic on the south side of Merrill, which is what I used when flying to Seldovia.

  8. #8

    Default Do you need a Mode C transponder for Merrill Field

    http://www.jber.af.mil/shared/media/...110412-101.pdf

    If you check out pages 13 and 14 it has a pretty easy good explanation of what the airspace is around that area.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cessna308 View Post
    However, these are only "advised" and not regulated altitudes.
    I disagree. Part 93.63(a) clearly states "No person may operate an aircraft at an altitude between 600 feet msl and 2,000 feet msl in that portion of this segment lying north of the midchannel of Knik Arm."

    In order to fly at an altitude between 600 and 2000 feet msl, you would need a Part 93 deviation from the controller.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Zim View Post
    I disagree. Part 93.63(a) clearly states "No person may operate an aircraft at an altitude between 600 feet msl and 2,000 feet msl in that portion of this segment lying north of the midchannel of Knik Arm."

    In order to fly at an altitude between 600 and 2000 feet msl, you would need a Part 93 deviation from the controller.

    They never needed to convince me. I prefer to keep my distance from military jets. Those things make some nasty wake turbulence and it seems worse when you're over the inlet.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •